Womens’ Self Defense Workshop

Fight Like a Girl hosted by Donna McCarron
ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS, NJ – Created by Defend University, the Fight Like a Girl Program teaches women basic self defense techniques that are easy to learn and easy to remember. Anyone can participate. There is no charge, however a donation is appreciated. ($20 suggested) Please make your donation check payable to: 180 Turning Lives Around
For more information please call the studio at 732-872-1442 and ask for Lisa.

What: Fight Like a Girl Self Defense Workshop
When: Saturday, November 20, 2010
Where:
IM=X Pilates
58 First Avenue
Atlantic Highlands
Time: 2pm – 4pm

Womens’ Self Defense Workshop

Fight Like a Girl hosted by Donna McCarron
ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS, NJ – Created by Defend University, the Fight Like a Girl Program teaches women basic self defense techniques that are easy to learn and easy to remember. Anyone can participate. There is no charge, however a donation is appreciated. ($20 suggested) Please make your donation check payable to: 180 Turning Lives Around
For more information please call the studio at 732-872-1442 and ask for Lisa.

What: Fight Like a Girl Self Defense Workshop
When: Saturday, November 20, 2010
Where:
IM=X Pilates
58 First Avenue
Atlantic Highlands
Time: 2pm – 4pm

Why did a Dolphin die in Sea Bright?

joe_reynoldsDespite being a beautiful late October day with bright sunshine and a cool crisp wind, the magic of autumn took a dark turn. A Short-beaked Common Dolphin was found dead in Sea Bright during the early morning. On top of the rock wall you could clearly see in the distance the sad silhouette of a deathlike dolphin on the edge of the Atlantic Ocean. The poor creature was alone.

Fortunately, a biologist from the NJ Marine Mammal Stranding Center located in Brigantine came on the scene soon to collect the dolphin. It will be taken to a wildlife center in Pennsylvania  where a necropsy, an autopsy for an animal, will be performed.

The dead Common Dolphin was discovered by some fisherman walking on the beach earlier in the morning. The marine biologist described the dolphin as a young female, between 150 to 175 pounds and about 6-feet long. Although this may sound large, keep in mind that adult females can reach lengths of approximately 8.5 feet.

Common Dolphins are not uncommon to area ocean waters, though they are rarely found beached. Off the Jersey Shore, this type of dolphin is particularly abundant on continental slope waters. They can gather in large schools up to a two thousand, however, smaller schools of around 30 are more typical. They eat on a variety of fishes and squids during the nighttime.

common_dolphin
Common Dolphin

I have no idea why this creature is called common, its body was stunning to see up close. The colors resembled the undertones of the ocean. The dolphin’s dorsal surface was dark gray to black, the belly was white, and in-between were hues of golden-yellow, and light-gray that swept over the body like a wave.

While every marine mammal stranding is unique, the all important question of what exterminated the life of this young female dolphin remains unanswered.  The juvenile dolphin appeared healthy. There were no cuts or slashes on the body. There was not even the sight of small amount of blood anywhere. Yes, there were a few scratches situated in the middle of the body, but the wildlife biologist was confident that they were  haphazardly caused by other Common Dolphins while chasing tightly for schools of fish.

common_dolphin_2

Although the marine mammal biologist could not be sure on the cause of death, he did say that it might have been due to what she ate. It was possible that perhaps a particular fish that the dolphin caught in the ocean was infected with parasites. The parasites then worked its way to the dolphin’s brain or destroyed important parts of the body, such as the lungs, stomach, or intestines. In some cases, the parasites may have became a problem only after another illness weakens the dolphin’s natural physical defenses, such as a disease caused by bacteria or a virus. Wildlife studies have shown that sick or dying whales or dolphins often strand themselves on a beach before dying. If this is the case, there is no telling if the death was natural or indirectly caused by people from the many types of chemical pollution we dump into the water.

Globally, Short-beaked Common Dolphins are often accidently killed from industrial fishing equipment, such as from trawls, gillnets, long-lines, drift nets and from purse seine nets while fishermen are trying to catch schools of Yellow-fin tuna. This type of habitat degradation from human activities has caused the unnatural death of many Common Dolphins that become entangled and drown. A lot of the fishing nets that international commercial fishermen use to catch their targeted species of fish are so large and so uncontrollable that they often become death traps for dolphins, whales, sharks, sea birds, and sea turtles.

common_dolphin_3

I believe every death has meaning. Although it seems certain that this juvenile Common Dolphin found dead in Sea Bright didn’t die directly from an accidental injury, her family still swims in an ocean of risk. Indeed, another Common Dolphin was found dead in Long Branch a few days prior and an additional Common Dolphin was found dead last year around the end of October near Sea Bright as well. Why so many dead Common Dolphins found off the northern Jersey Shore?

No doubt, if we want to preserve the wonderful diversity of life that exists in the ocean than we must work to be part of the solution, not part of the problem. If we want a clean, healthy ocean that can sustain dolphins, whales, and a rich web of biological diversity, we need to get involved to be part of the solution.

If you would like more information on the NJ Marine Mammal Stranding Center and to help this important non-profit organization, please check out their website at: http://www.marinemammalstrandingcenter.org/

For ways to help clean up and preserve a healthy ocean, please check out Clean Ocean Action’s website at: http://www.cleanoceanaction.org/

common_dolphin_4

Lastly, it all comes down to the power of the purse. For ways to make sure that the fish on your dinner plate is not contributing to poor fishing practices and to help  ensure that ocean habitats are not destroyed while fishing, please check out this website from Seafood Watch: http://www.montereybayaquarium.org/cr/seafoodwatch.aspx

Why did a Dolphin die in Sea Bright?

joe_reynoldsDespite being a beautiful late October day with bright sunshine and a cool crisp wind, the magic of autumn took a dark turn. A Short-beaked Common Dolphin was found dead in Sea Bright during the early morning. On top of the rock wall you could clearly see in the distance the sad silhouette of a deathlike dolphin on the edge of the Atlantic Ocean. The poor creature was alone.

Fortunately, a biologist from the NJ Marine Mammal Stranding Center located in Brigantine came on the scene soon to collect the dolphin. It will be taken to a wildlife center in Pennsylvania  where a necropsy, an autopsy for an animal, will be performed.

The dead Common Dolphin was discovered by some fisherman walking on the beach earlier in the morning. The marine biologist described the dolphin as a young female, between 150 to 175 pounds and about 6-feet long. Although this may sound large, keep in mind that adult females can reach lengths of approximately 8.5 feet.

Common Dolphins are not uncommon to area ocean waters, though they are rarely found beached. Off the Jersey Shore, this type of dolphin is particularly abundant on continental slope waters. They can gather in large schools up to a two thousand, however, smaller schools of around 30 are more typical. They eat on a variety of fishes and squids during the nighttime.

common_dolphin
Common Dolphin

I have no idea why this creature is called common, its body was stunning to see up close. The colors resembled the undertones of the ocean. The dolphin’s dorsal surface was dark gray to black, the belly was white, and in-between were hues of golden-yellow, and light-gray that swept over the body like a wave.

While every marine mammal stranding is unique, the all important question of what exterminated the life of this young female dolphin remains unanswered.  The juvenile dolphin appeared healthy. There were no cuts or slashes on the body. There was not even the sight of small amount of blood anywhere. Yes, there were a few scratches situated in the middle of the body, but the wildlife biologist was confident that they were  haphazardly caused by other Common Dolphins while chasing tightly for schools of fish.

common_dolphin_2

Although the marine mammal biologist could not be sure on the cause of death, he did say that it might have been due to what she ate. It was possible that perhaps a particular fish that the dolphin caught in the ocean was infected with parasites. The parasites then worked its way to the dolphin’s brain or destroyed important parts of the body, such as the lungs, stomach, or intestines. In some cases, the parasites may have became a problem only after another illness weakens the dolphin’s natural physical defenses, such as a disease caused by bacteria or a virus. Wildlife studies have shown that sick or dying whales or dolphins often strand themselves on a beach before dying. If this is the case, there is no telling if the death was natural or indirectly caused by people from the many types of chemical pollution we dump into the water.

Globally, Short-beaked Common Dolphins are often accidently killed from industrial fishing equipment, such as from trawls, gillnets, long-lines, drift nets and from purse seine nets while fishermen are trying to catch schools of Yellow-fin tuna. This type of habitat degradation from human activities has caused the unnatural death of many Common Dolphins that become entangled and drown. A lot of the fishing nets that international commercial fishermen use to catch their targeted species of fish are so large and so uncontrollable that they often become death traps for dolphins, whales, sharks, sea birds, and sea turtles.

common_dolphin_3

I believe every death has meaning. Although it seems certain that this juvenile Common Dolphin found dead in Sea Bright didn’t die directly from an accidental injury, her family still swims in an ocean of risk. Indeed, another Common Dolphin was found dead in Long Branch a few days prior and an additional Common Dolphin was found dead last year around the end of October near Sea Bright as well. Why so many dead Common Dolphins found off the northern Jersey Shore?

No doubt, if we want to preserve the wonderful diversity of life that exists in the ocean than we must work to be part of the solution, not part of the problem. If we want a clean, healthy ocean that can sustain dolphins, whales, and a rich web of biological diversity, we need to get involved to be part of the solution.

If you would like more information on the NJ Marine Mammal Stranding Center and to help this important non-profit organization, please check out their website at: http://www.marinemammalstrandingcenter.org/

For ways to help clean up and preserve a healthy ocean, please check out Clean Ocean Action’s website at: http://www.cleanoceanaction.org/

common_dolphin_4

Lastly, it all comes down to the power of the purse. For ways to make sure that the fish on your dinner plate is not contributing to poor fishing practices and to help  ensure that ocean habitats are not destroyed while fishing, please check out this website from Seafood Watch: http://www.montereybayaquarium.org/cr/seafoodwatch.aspx

Why did a Dolphin die in Sea Bright?

joe_reynoldsDespite being a beautiful late October day with bright sunshine and a cool crisp wind, the magic of autumn took a dark turn. A Short-beaked Common Dolphin was found dead in Sea Bright during the early morning. On top of the rock wall you could clearly see in the distance the sad silhouette of a deathlike dolphin on the edge of the Atlantic Ocean. The poor creature was alone.

Fortunately, a biologist from the NJ Marine Mammal Stranding Center located in Brigantine came on the scene soon to collect the dolphin. It will be taken to a wildlife center in Pennsylvania  where a necropsy, an autopsy for an animal, will be performed.

The dead Common Dolphin was discovered by some fisherman walking on the beach earlier in the morning. The marine biologist described the dolphin as a young female, between 150 to 175 pounds and about 6-feet long. Although this may sound large, keep in mind that adult females can reach lengths of approximately 8.5 feet.

Common Dolphins are not uncommon to area ocean waters, though they are rarely found beached. Off the Jersey Shore, this type of dolphin is particularly abundant on continental slope waters. They can gather in large schools up to a two thousand, however, smaller schools of around 30 are more typical. They eat on a variety of fishes and squids during the nighttime.

common_dolphin
Common Dolphin

I have no idea why this creature is called common, its body was stunning to see up close. The colors resembled the undertones of the ocean. The dolphin’s dorsal surface was dark gray to black, the belly was white, and in-between were hues of golden-yellow, and light-gray that swept over the body like a wave.

While every marine mammal stranding is unique, the all important question of what exterminated the life of this young female dolphin remains unanswered.  The juvenile dolphin appeared healthy. There were no cuts or slashes on the body. There was not even the sight of small amount of blood anywhere. Yes, there were a few scratches situated in the middle of the body, but the wildlife biologist was confident that they were  haphazardly caused by other Common Dolphins while chasing tightly for schools of fish.

common_dolphin_2

Although the marine mammal biologist could not be sure on the cause of death, he did say that it might have been due to what she ate. It was possible that perhaps a particular fish that the dolphin caught in the ocean was infected with parasites. The parasites then worked its way to the dolphin’s brain or destroyed important parts of the body, such as the lungs, stomach, or intestines. In some cases, the parasites may have became a problem only after another illness weakens the dolphin’s natural physical defenses, such as a disease caused by bacteria or a virus. Wildlife studies have shown that sick or dying whales or dolphins often strand themselves on a beach before dying. If this is the case, there is no telling if the death was natural or indirectly caused by people from the many types of chemical pollution we dump into the water.

Globally, Short-beaked Common Dolphins are often accidently killed from industrial fishing equipment, such as from trawls, gillnets, long-lines, drift nets and from purse seine nets while fishermen are trying to catch schools of Yellow-fin tuna. This type of habitat degradation from human activities has caused the unnatural death of many Common Dolphins that become entangled and drown. A lot of the fishing nets that international commercial fishermen use to catch their targeted species of fish are so large and so uncontrollable that they often become death traps for dolphins, whales, sharks, sea birds, and sea turtles.

common_dolphin_3

I believe every death has meaning. Although it seems certain that this juvenile Common Dolphin found dead in Sea Bright didn’t die directly from an accidental injury, her family still swims in an ocean of risk. Indeed, another Common Dolphin was found dead in Long Branch a few days prior and an additional Common Dolphin was found dead last year around the end of October near Sea Bright as well. Why so many dead Common Dolphins found off the northern Jersey Shore?

No doubt, if we want to preserve the wonderful diversity of life that exists in the ocean than we must work to be part of the solution, not part of the problem. If we want a clean, healthy ocean that can sustain dolphins, whales, and a rich web of biological diversity, we need to get involved to be part of the solution.

If you would like more information on the NJ Marine Mammal Stranding Center and to help this important non-profit organization, please check out their website at: http://www.marinemammalstrandingcenter.org/

For ways to help clean up and preserve a healthy ocean, please check out Clean Ocean Action’s website at: http://www.cleanoceanaction.org/

common_dolphin_4

Lastly, it all comes down to the power of the purse. For ways to make sure that the fish on your dinner plate is not contributing to poor fishing practices and to help  ensure that ocean habitats are not destroyed while fishing, please check out this website from Seafood Watch: http://www.montereybayaquarium.org/cr/seafoodwatch.aspx

Voices of September 11th Seeks Survivors, Families and Workers

MIDDLETOWN, NJ – Voices of September 11th (VOICES) invites you to attend our upcoming 9/11 Living Memorial appointments in Middletown, NJ.   On Monday, November 8th and Thursday, December 16th VOICES staff will host individual Living Memorial appointments.  Meetings will be held at the Middletown Township Public Library located at 55 New Monmouth Road in Middletown, NJ.  9/11 families, survivors, rescue and recovery workers and those who responded are encouraged to attend.

mt_library

The 9/11 Living Memorial Project, a digital archive currently online at www.911livingmemorial.org chronicles the lives of the nearly 3,000 lives lost at the Pentagon; Shanksville, Pennsylvania; and the World Trade Center in New York City; and documents the inspirational stories of survivors, rescue and recovery workers.   VOICES staff has met with over 800 families who have created a meaningful tribute to their loved ones through an extensive collection of over 40,000 photographs, written materials and personal keepsakes.

9/11 Living Memorial Workshop Appointments

VOICES staff will meet one-on-one with participants to organize and scan photographs and personal keepsakes to include in the 9/11 Living Memorial Project. Participants are invited to bring in photographs, written tributes, eulogies, biographies, newspaper articles and other personal keepsakes that will create a meaningful legacy to honor those who died and to document your personal story for future generations.  Unless otherwise arranged, all materials will be returned at the workshop.

VOICES encourages, 9/11 families, rescue and recovery workers and survivors to attend. Individual appointments last approximately 90 minutes. Due to the limited space, reservations are required. Please contact Michelle Doherty at [email protected] or (203) 966-3911 to schedule an appointment or for information on how to participate by mail or email.

Voices of September 11th Seeks Survivors, Families and Workers

MIDDLETOWN, NJ – Voices of September 11th (VOICES) invites you to attend our upcoming 9/11 Living Memorial appointments in Middletown, NJ.   On Monday, November 8th and Thursday, December 16th VOICES staff will host individual Living Memorial appointments.  Meetings will be held at the Middletown Township Public Library located at 55 New Monmouth Road in Middletown, NJ.  9/11 families, survivors, rescue and recovery workers and those who responded are encouraged to attend.

mt_library

The 9/11 Living Memorial Project, a digital archive currently online at www.911livingmemorial.org chronicles the lives of the nearly 3,000 lives lost at the Pentagon; Shanksville, Pennsylvania; and the World Trade Center in New York City; and documents the inspirational stories of survivors, rescue and recovery workers.   VOICES staff has met with over 800 families who have created a meaningful tribute to their loved ones through an extensive collection of over 40,000 photographs, written materials and personal keepsakes.

9/11 Living Memorial Workshop Appointments

VOICES staff will meet one-on-one with participants to organize and scan photographs and personal keepsakes to include in the 9/11 Living Memorial Project. Participants are invited to bring in photographs, written tributes, eulogies, biographies, newspaper articles and other personal keepsakes that will create a meaningful legacy to honor those who died and to document your personal story for future generations.  Unless otherwise arranged, all materials will be returned at the workshop.

VOICES encourages, 9/11 families, rescue and recovery workers and survivors to attend. Individual appointments last approximately 90 minutes. Due to the limited space, reservations are required. Please contact Michelle Doherty at [email protected] or (203) 966-3911 to schedule an appointment or for information on how to participate by mail or email.

On Freedom and Responsibility: Oscar Romero

bruce_woodTwo weeks ago marked the end to Hispanic Heritage Month here in the United States. Recently, I had the opportunity to study with the other writer of this column, Rev. Hancock-Stefan about the martyrs of the church and about their stories. So, in honor of these two events I wanted to frame my column this week around the life of Father Oscar Romero, a Hispanic Roman Catholic priest who gave his life serving God and defending the poor.

Romero lived his life in El Salvador as a true man of God. He entered the priesthood and was ordained in 1942. For the rest of his days as a Catholic Priest and Archbishop he struggled within himself and outwardly with the government of his day. The government grew more steadily totalitarian, taking control of every facet of a person’s life – including what he or she could or couldn’t say about the government. At first, Romero worked within the context of government cooperation, but his life was radically changed by an assassin’s bullet. In 1977, Father Rutillo Grande, a close friend of Romero’s and a critic of the government, was gunned down on his way to perform mass.

Romero’s life changed in an instant. He began to become suspicious and even harsh toward government officials. He spoke out about the brutal treatment of the poor and the people of faith. Priests were being slaughtered for speaking out, churches were being ransacked and the ocean of poor grew steadily more oppressed by a government seeking to control everything. Romero finally could not take the horror that surrounded him any longer and began to directly preach from the pulpit that Christian soldiers in the Salvadorian army should no longer follow the brutal directives of the government officials, but follow the Christian command for peace, love, freedom, and to help the poor.

Another assassin’s bullet would end Romero’s life for this preaching. On March 24th, 1980 Romero was performing mass when his life was cut short by the gunshots of the government death squads. He was in the middle of performing the Eucharist (the Catholic portion of Mass when the bread and wine are consecrated) when he was killed. In a moment that could only symbolize the plight of the people the bullet that killed him did so as Romero had lifted up the cup (a sign of Jesus’ shed blood) and was holding it high to be blessed.

Why does this man’s life mean anything to us today? Because his bravery and his faith are an example to us all. He was not a perfect man by any means. In the beginning of his life he turned a blind eye to the suffering of people and did not speak out when he saw crimes occurring around him. But when it mattered, when it really counted, his heart shone through and his voiced boomed loud, and the whole world heard him when he spoke out again the injustices in this world. He spoke out against people oppressing people, of limiting their freedom to speak, love, work and worship. He spoke out against an order that demanded uniformity or death, obedience to man over obedience to God.

Oscar Romero is in each of us. That potential to look at our world through the eyes of compassion, love, strength, unity (without loss of diversity of opinion or personhood), and faith is within us all if we reach down to find that courage within ourselves. We are blessed that we live in a nation that allows us the freedom to have our voice heard, to worship without fear of death, and to celebrate diversity. But we need to remain vigilant that these rights are not invalidated or eroded away. We need to be conscious of the world around us and speak up to defend our faith and to defend those who cannot defend themselves.

As we stop for a moment this year to celebrate the lives of American Hispanics who have affected our lives, let us also stop to remember those who have died to set an example, who affect our lives by reminding us of our greatest freedoms, and as a people, our greatest responsibilities.

Let’s turn our hearts today.

On Freedom and Responsibility: Oscar Romero

bruce_woodTwo weeks ago marked the end to Hispanic Heritage Month here in the United States. Recently, I had the opportunity to study with the other writer of this column, Rev. Hancock-Stefan about the martyrs of the church and about their stories. So, in honor of these two events I wanted to frame my column this week around the life of Father Oscar Romero, a Hispanic Roman Catholic priest who gave his life serving God and defending the poor.

Romero lived his life in El Salvador as a true man of God. He entered the priesthood and was ordained in 1942. For the rest of his days as a Catholic Priest and Archbishop he struggled within himself and outwardly with the government of his day. The government grew more steadily totalitarian, taking control of every facet of a person’s life – including what he or she could or couldn’t say about the government. At first, Romero worked within the context of government cooperation, but his life was radically changed by an assassin’s bullet. In 1977, Father Rutillo Grande, a close friend of Romero’s and a critic of the government, was gunned down on his way to perform mass.

Romero’s life changed in an instant. He began to become suspicious and even harsh toward government officials. He spoke out about the brutal treatment of the poor and the people of faith. Priests were being slaughtered for speaking out, churches were being ransacked and the ocean of poor grew steadily more oppressed by a government seeking to control everything. Romero finally could not take the horror that surrounded him any longer and began to directly preach from the pulpit that Christian soldiers in the Salvadorian army should no longer follow the brutal directives of the government officials, but follow the Christian command for peace, love, freedom, and to help the poor.

Another assassin’s bullet would end Romero’s life for this preaching. On March 24th, 1980 Romero was performing mass when his life was cut short by the gunshots of the government death squads. He was in the middle of performing the Eucharist (the Catholic portion of Mass when the bread and wine are consecrated) when he was killed. In a moment that could only symbolize the plight of the people the bullet that killed him did so as Romero had lifted up the cup (a sign of Jesus’ shed blood) and was holding it high to be blessed.

Why does this man’s life mean anything to us today? Because his bravery and his faith are an example to us all. He was not a perfect man by any means. In the beginning of his life he turned a blind eye to the suffering of people and did not speak out when he saw crimes occurring around him. But when it mattered, when it really counted, his heart shone through and his voiced boomed loud, and the whole world heard him when he spoke out again the injustices in this world. He spoke out against people oppressing people, of limiting their freedom to speak, love, work and worship. He spoke out against an order that demanded uniformity or death, obedience to man over obedience to God.

Oscar Romero is in each of us. That potential to look at our world through the eyes of compassion, love, strength, unity (without loss of diversity of opinion or personhood), and faith is within us all if we reach down to find that courage within ourselves. We are blessed that we live in a nation that allows us the freedom to have our voice heard, to worship without fear of death, and to celebrate diversity. But we need to remain vigilant that these rights are not invalidated or eroded away. We need to be conscious of the world around us and speak up to defend our faith and to defend those who cannot defend themselves.

As we stop for a moment this year to celebrate the lives of American Hispanics who have affected our lives, let us also stop to remember those who have died to set an example, who affect our lives by reminding us of our greatest freedoms, and as a people, our greatest responsibilities.

Let’s turn our hearts today.

Middlesex County Joins e-Filing Shared Service

Monmouth County’s web portal now has 13 member counties

FREEHOLD, NJ – Monmouth County Clerk M. Claire French welcomed Middlesex County to the statewide electronic-filing web portal. Middlesex becomes the 13th county to join a shared service designed by Monmouth County that enables mortgages and deeds to be filed electronically.

French also presented the Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders with a check for $66,000, representing the hosting fees for two years collected from 11 other counties that belong to the portal. The money goes into the county’s general fund. The cost for each county is $3,000 per year.

“Monmouth County unveiled the e-filing web portal five years ago and today we have 13 member counties,” French said. “Providing a mechanism whereby attorneys and title companies can file land records electronically helps reduce staff and save taxpayer dollars, and this is a great convenience to the public.”

“Filing electronically is the next initiative in my mission to improve and modernize the services of the Middlesex County Clerk’s Office,” Middlesex County Clerk Elaine M. Flynn said. “I am proud to introduce e-filing to Middlesex County because it offers more efficient communication for larger businesses. We will continue to accept requests through the mail for our more traditional businesses.

The e-filing system, which is hosted by Monmouth County, was created by the Monmouth County Clerk’s Office and designed for all 21 counties to share. The state Division of Archives and Records Management (DARM) has honored the program for its use of technology in delivering government services. Grants from DARM have allowed Monmouth County to upgrade and add features to the highly successful program.

The program allows attorneys and financial institutions to electronically file and record deeds, mortgages and other land title-related filings with the offices of participating county clerks and registers in New Jersey. Instead of mailing real estate documents to county clerks and registers, they can now be filed electronically using the Internet.

This e-filing system is among the first of many shared services arrangements the county has with Middlesex County. The two counties share medical examiners and youth detention services, which together saves each county more than $2 million per year.

“We are extremely pleased that Middlesex County has joined the e-filing system,” Monmouth County Freeholder Director Lillian G. Burry said. “The e-filing system is just one of many examples of government sharing services to lower costs and improve services.”

“As a county government, we are consistently seeking out shared services arrangements that make good business sense and work to benefit our residents,” said Middlesex County Freeholder Director Christopher D. Rafano. “Like our previous partnerships with Monmouth County, this arrangement meets both criteria and helps us help our residents.”

In addition to Monmouth and Middlesex, 11 other counties are members to the online e-filing portal: Atlantic, Ocean, Cape May, Passaic, Burlington, Cumberland, Camden, Essex, Sussex, Mercer and Morris.