Avoid Bringing Bed Bugs Home with You

Travel today involves a high risk of bed bug hitchhikers

NEW JERSEY – “Not long ago the thought of staying at New York’s famed Waldorf-Astoria and returning home infested with bed bugs was unthinkable,” says Leonard Douglen, the Executive Director of the New Jersey Pest Management Association, “but today travel that includes staying overnight anywhere carries with it the high risk of bringing bed beds back home.”

“As bizarre as it might seem,” says Douglen, “today’s traveler has to become a bed bug detective whenever they check into a hotel or motel anywhere in the nation.”

He offered the following advice. “It’s useful to talk to the hotel’s management before checking in to learn if they have procedures in place to eliminate a bed bug infestation. A hotel that shares its prevention and maintenance plan is a better place to stay.”

Upon checking into your room, Douglen recommends that “you take a careful look at all the areas in the room you expect to be using.” Bring a small flashlight with you,” says Douglen and “check for bedbugs where you will be sleeping and chairs you with using. Bed bugs are attracted to body heat and even the carbon dioxide that humans exhale.”

Bed bugs are extremely small, about the size of a sesame seed. “If you spot even one, that means there are others because they breed at a very high rate,” says Douglen. “Take the time to check behind the headboard. Then check carefully along the seams, crevices, and piping around the mattress.”

“You can’t be too careful. Look under the mattress pad and under the sheets. Then check along the edges and underneath the box spring,” says Douglen. “Then check around the joints in bedside tables, including the drawers, and even pictures that might be hung on the wall behind the bed.”

Though it might sound odd—and it is—Douglen recommends avoiding setting one’s luggage on the bed or floor. Instead, “when you first enter, put your luggage in the bathtub. Conduct your inspection and then place the luggage on racks away from the wall. Keeping various clothing items in plastic, sealable bags will protect them from being infested.”

“When you get home, put the clothes, still in plastic bags, into the dryer for about forty minutes. If an item should not be heated, then put it in the freezer and leave it there for two weeks,” says Douglen.

“The problem is so widespread you can even check www.bedbugregistry.com to find out whether a place you plan to stay has been reported for bed bug infestations.”

“Even guests at your home can bring bed bugs with them,” says Douglen, who suggests asking them to leave their shoes outside. Designate a place where guests can put their coats, purses and other items rather than put them on couches and other furniture.

“This may seem extreme, but a bed bug infestation is one of the most challenging pest control problems around,” says Douglen. He cited a recent article in Forbes magazine that identified America’s most bed bug infested cities. There were three in Ohio, Cincinnati, Columbus, and Dayton.

“Cities such as New York, Chicago, Los Angeles and Washington, D.C. have high levels of tourist and business travelers are among those named by the Forbes article,” noted Douglen,” so that means extra caution is needed if you visit them.”

Founded in 1941, the New Jersey Pest Management Association maintains a website at www.njpma.com with information regarding its members and consumer information about various insect and rodent pests.

Avoid Bringing Bed Bugs Home with You

Travel today involves a high risk of bed bug hitchhikers

NEW JERSEY – “Not long ago the thought of staying at New York’s famed Waldorf-Astoria and returning home infested with bed bugs was unthinkable,” says Leonard Douglen, the Executive Director of the New Jersey Pest Management Association, “but today travel that includes staying overnight anywhere carries with it the high risk of bringing bed beds back home.”

“As bizarre as it might seem,” says Douglen, “today’s traveler has to become a bed bug detective whenever they check into a hotel or motel anywhere in the nation.”

He offered the following advice. “It’s useful to talk to the hotel’s management before checking in to learn if they have procedures in place to eliminate a bed bug infestation. A hotel that shares its prevention and maintenance plan is a better place to stay.”

Upon checking into your room, Douglen recommends that “you take a careful look at all the areas in the room you expect to be using.” Bring a small flashlight with you,” says Douglen and “check for bedbugs where you will be sleeping and chairs you with using. Bed bugs are attracted to body heat and even the carbon dioxide that humans exhale.”

Bed bugs are extremely small, about the size of a sesame seed. “If you spot even one, that means there are others because they breed at a very high rate,” says Douglen. “Take the time to check behind the headboard. Then check carefully along the seams, crevices, and piping around the mattress.”

“You can’t be too careful. Look under the mattress pad and under the sheets. Then check along the edges and underneath the box spring,” says Douglen. “Then check around the joints in bedside tables, including the drawers, and even pictures that might be hung on the wall behind the bed.”

Though it might sound odd—and it is—Douglen recommends avoiding setting one’s luggage on the bed or floor. Instead, “when you first enter, put your luggage in the bathtub. Conduct your inspection and then place the luggage on racks away from the wall. Keeping various clothing items in plastic, sealable bags will protect them from being infested.”

“When you get home, put the clothes, still in plastic bags, into the dryer for about forty minutes. If an item should not be heated, then put it in the freezer and leave it there for two weeks,” says Douglen.

“The problem is so widespread you can even check www.bedbugregistry.com to find out whether a place you plan to stay has been reported for bed bug infestations.”

“Even guests at your home can bring bed bugs with them,” says Douglen, who suggests asking them to leave their shoes outside. Designate a place where guests can put their coats, purses and other items rather than put them on couches and other furniture.

“This may seem extreme, but a bed bug infestation is one of the most challenging pest control problems around,” says Douglen. He cited a recent article in Forbes magazine that identified America’s most bed bug infested cities. There were three in Ohio, Cincinnati, Columbus, and Dayton.

“Cities such as New York, Chicago, Los Angeles and Washington, D.C. have high levels of tourist and business travelers are among those named by the Forbes article,” noted Douglen,” so that means extra caution is needed if you visit them.”

Founded in 1941, the New Jersey Pest Management Association maintains a website at www.njpma.com with information regarding its members and consumer information about various insect and rodent pests.

Students Win Scholarship Money Through New Video Game Website

Little Silver, NJ –  The cost of college has become astronomical, upwards of $30,000 per year for New Jersey public colleges and in the stratosphere of $40,000 to $50,000 and higher for many private colleges. This past January, four Red Bank Regional (RBR) students– Andrew Kamp, Shrewsbury, Little Silver residents Pat Moore, Cliff O’Malley, Will Ferguson and Will’s younger brother Joseph, a Markham Place student– made a small dent in their future college costs by doing something all teenagers love to do, playing video games. The four students recently returned from an all-expense paid vacation in Disney World’s BoardWalk Resort as finalists in the inaugural ScholarGamers.com final competition. 7,500 students participated in the nation-wide competition.  Nearly $30,000 in scholarship money was awarded to the top 15 participants. First place garnered $10,000; 2nd place $7,500, 3rd place $5,000 and $500 for all other finalists. Of the 15 finalists, five were from New Jersey, and four of those from RBR. Joseph won a supplemental competition for the top three students who invited the most students to the website.

rbr_gamers_fergusons

Pat Moore, Cliff O’Malley, Will Ferguson, Joseph Ferguson, of Little Silver and Andrew Kamp, Shrewsbury, are pictured above (left to right) at the inaugural ScholarGamers.com final competition held in Disney World in January. The RBR students were four of 15 finalists who competed in the national competition and won $500 in scholarship money plus an all expense paid weekend at the BoardWalk Resort with one parent. The program is an ongoing scholarship gaming competition accessed at ScholarGamers.com for students 13 and up.

The ScholarGamers.com website was launched in November of 2010 by Holmdel, NJ-based Internet Sport Games Associates, the idea of marketing executive and ScholarGamers CEO Angelo Tartaro. As a parent of two daughters who have achieved six higher education degrees between them, he was well-aware of the escalating cost of college. His marketing group identified a market niche which married students’ propensity to play video games with the reward of scholarship money. The winners’ money is deposited into a State of New Jersey 529 account opened in the students’ names. Parents would administer these accounts going forward.

Mr. Tartaro comments on the website’s concept, “The key is to empower ourselves to find solutions to the ever increasing cost of education. Fifty-seven percent of students drop out of college today because of financial pressures. There are scholarships for students who are the best basketball player or cheerleader, but not much for the other kids. And most kids love to play video games.”

The site has licensed many popular, family-friendly flash games which students can access to play for free. Competitions for scholarships are grouped into a series of 75-day rounds where players compete against the entire ScholarGamers.com community to generate the highest cumulative score for a 45 day period. A time limit of 20 minutes is imposed on each competition.  Many desirable prizes were awarded in the preliminary rounds to retain the students’ interest.

The prizes and scholarship monies are initially funded by ScholarGamers, which hopes to grow with advertising and sponsorship funding as the site expands.

Three of the students learned about the competition from their RBR, AP Calculus teacher, Karen Laffey. Her husband, Michael, is the founding company’s counsel.

She comments, “When I first told the students about this opportunity they responded, ‘Really! I can play video games and win scholarships too!’” She adds, “Interest spread to other students especially when some of their peers began winning great prizes including an I Pad, a Kindle and $100 in Visa cards.”

Andrew Kamp remarks, “It was a great way to earn scholarship money without having to write an essay.”

Will Ferguson was just having fun playing the competition when he won a $100 Visa card and thought, “why not continue.” He ended up the highest cumulative scorer out of the 7,500 students who participated. Will was accompanied by both his parents to the Florida competition as younger brother Joe, (who just qualified to compete at the minimum age of 13) was one of the three winners who invited the most students onto the site. ScholarGamers allowed one parent for each of the winners to accompany their students to Florida with airplane fare and hotel accommodations covered by the company.

Joanne Ferguson comments on the adventure, “It was a great experience; what I found so gratifying was the camaraderie that developed among the students from different backgrounds and locations in the United States. They were so happy to meet each other after only knowing one another from the screen names on the website listing their game scores.”

Angelo Tartaro adds, “Every one of the kids was impressive. They were bright, articulate and understood the value of what they were getting. It was very rewarding to us.”

The site is being expanded in 2011 to include college students. For more information on the ongoing competitions, visit the website ScholarGamers.com.

Students Win Scholarship Money Through New Video Game Website

Little Silver, NJ –  The cost of college has become astronomical, upwards of $30,000 per year for New Jersey public colleges and in the stratosphere of $40,000 to $50,000 and higher for many private colleges. This past January, four Red Bank Regional (RBR) students– Andrew Kamp, Shrewsbury, Little Silver residents Pat Moore, Cliff O’Malley, Will Ferguson and Will’s younger brother Joseph, a Markham Place student– made a small dent in their future college costs by doing something all teenagers love to do, playing video games. The four students recently returned from an all-expense paid vacation in Disney World’s BoardWalk Resort as finalists in the inaugural ScholarGamers.com final competition. 7,500 students participated in the nation-wide competition.  Nearly $30,000 in scholarship money was awarded to the top 15 participants. First place garnered $10,000; 2nd place $7,500, 3rd place $5,000 and $500 for all other finalists. Of the 15 finalists, five were from New Jersey, and four of those from RBR. Joseph won a supplemental competition for the top three students who invited the most students to the website.

rbr_gamers_fergusons

Pat Moore, Cliff O’Malley, Will Ferguson, Joseph Ferguson, of Little Silver and Andrew Kamp, Shrewsbury, are pictured above (left to right) at the inaugural ScholarGamers.com final competition held in Disney World in January. The RBR students were four of 15 finalists who competed in the national competition and won $500 in scholarship money plus an all expense paid weekend at the BoardWalk Resort with one parent. The program is an ongoing scholarship gaming competition accessed at ScholarGamers.com for students 13 and up.

The ScholarGamers.com website was launched in November of 2010 by Holmdel, NJ-based Internet Sport Games Associates, the idea of marketing executive and ScholarGamers CEO Angelo Tartaro. As a parent of two daughters who have achieved six higher education degrees between them, he was well-aware of the escalating cost of college. His marketing group identified a market niche which married students’ propensity to play video games with the reward of scholarship money. The winners’ money is deposited into a State of New Jersey 529 account opened in the students’ names. Parents would administer these accounts going forward.

Mr. Tartaro comments on the website’s concept, “The key is to empower ourselves to find solutions to the ever increasing cost of education. Fifty-seven percent of students drop out of college today because of financial pressures. There are scholarships for students who are the best basketball player or cheerleader, but not much for the other kids. And most kids love to play video games.”

The site has licensed many popular, family-friendly flash games which students can access to play for free. Competitions for scholarships are grouped into a series of 75-day rounds where players compete against the entire ScholarGamers.com community to generate the highest cumulative score for a 45 day period. A time limit of 20 minutes is imposed on each competition.  Many desirable prizes were awarded in the preliminary rounds to retain the students’ interest.

The prizes and scholarship monies are initially funded by ScholarGamers, which hopes to grow with advertising and sponsorship funding as the site expands.

Three of the students learned about the competition from their RBR, AP Calculus teacher, Karen Laffey. Her husband, Michael, is the founding company’s counsel.

She comments, “When I first told the students about this opportunity they responded, ‘Really! I can play video games and win scholarships too!’” She adds, “Interest spread to other students especially when some of their peers began winning great prizes including an I Pad, a Kindle and $100 in Visa cards.”

Andrew Kamp remarks, “It was a great way to earn scholarship money without having to write an essay.”

Will Ferguson was just having fun playing the competition when he won a $100 Visa card and thought, “why not continue.” He ended up the highest cumulative scorer out of the 7,500 students who participated. Will was accompanied by both his parents to the Florida competition as younger brother Joe, (who just qualified to compete at the minimum age of 13) was one of the three winners who invited the most students onto the site. ScholarGamers allowed one parent for each of the winners to accompany their students to Florida with airplane fare and hotel accommodations covered by the company.

Joanne Ferguson comments on the adventure, “It was a great experience; what I found so gratifying was the camaraderie that developed among the students from different backgrounds and locations in the United States. They were so happy to meet each other after only knowing one another from the screen names on the website listing their game scores.”

Angelo Tartaro adds, “Every one of the kids was impressive. They were bright, articulate and understood the value of what they were getting. It was very rewarding to us.”

The site is being expanded in 2011 to include college students. For more information on the ongoing competitions, visit the website ScholarGamers.com.

Carl versus Goliath

dennis_mikolay_09While the media has long been criticized as biased, their political affiliation and ideological polarization has become even more dreadfully obvious in recent years. During election season, pundits, newspapers, and TV networks often choose which candidates they will support long before any official endorsement is made; for several months, that candidate’s propaganda is broadcast under the guise of journalism.

Former Glen Ridge Mayor Carl Bergmanson knows of the media’s bias better than most people. He has spent his entire political career rocking the political boat, often disrupting the inherently corrupt status quo in the face of opposition from the mainstream media.

Bergmanson’s first clash with the political elite occurred in 1990. His hometown had long operated under single-party rule; the Civic Conference Committee controlled the town’s politics, and only their candidates were considered viable. The organization, however, was extremely exclusive and rarely effectively served the public’s needs.

“When I first took on the Civic Conference Committee, they met in secret,” said Bergmanson. “I said to myself: ‘no wonder the city council is not representative, it isn’t a representative system of government!”

Despite an uphill battle, Bergmanson was elected to the borough council as an independent; his victory was unprecedented. In 2003, he made history when he was elected mayor, marking the first time since 1913 a Civic Conference Committee candidate had lost a mayoral election.

Bergmanson, however, soon set his sights beyond the borders of Glen Ridge. By 2008, Governor Jon Corzine had become wildly unpopular: the state was on the brink of a financial crisis, property taxes were rising exponentially, and it seemed that serving the special interests had become Trenton’s top priority.

Bergmanson became the chairman of The Committee to Recall Jon Corzine and was soon among one of the most vocal critics of Governor Corzine.

“It was more than just him doing a bad job as governor,” said Bergmanson. “He broke a bond of trust. He talked about making Constitutional changes we needed to have made. We had a special session of legislature, and he promised if it didn’t work he would hold a constitutional convention…This was a very important issue to me, because we wont solve property tax problems until we solve these constitutional issues. He promised this to me personally when I met with him and he broke that promise.”

The media shunned Bergmanson’s effort to recall Corzine and completely ignored the entire endeavor. Without any coverage, the already difficult task of collecting the required signatures became impossible.

“We would have had to have 400,000 notarized signatures,” said Bergmanson. “It is set up to be impossible.”

By 2009, Governor Corzine was gearing up to seek re-election. Bergmanson, not content to sit idly by and watch Corzine sail to victory, began to consider running for office yet again. During an appearance on NJ101.5FM’s Jim Gearhart Show, Bergmanson announced he would challenge Governor Corzine in the Democratic Primaries because “it needed to be done.”

The media and the Democratic Party made it clear almost instantaneously they would not support this act of insubordination. Bergmanson would have to challenge Corzine’s vast financial resources and political connections. The Democratic elite were so aghast that anyone would challenge their flagship candidate that they tried to squash Bergmanson’s campaign. Bergmanson was not invited to Democratic Party events or conventions, and while Republican candidates Steve Lonegan and Chris Christie squared off in a series of public debates, Corzine never appeared alongside Bergmanson.

“We got so little coverage,” said Bergmanson. “The editor at the Star Ledger actually said point blank that he wouldn’t cover my campaign.”

Amidst a media blackout, and with the entire Democratic machine running against him, Bergmanson still managed to receive nine percent of the vote in the primary.

“I was very happy with that,” said Bergmanson. “We got virtually no coverage, and still we got nine percent. I was very gratified, because I had met with a lot of folks who saw I was talking about making changes that actually would make a positive changes in their lives.”

While Bergmanson has re-entered private life, he still keeps a close eye on politics. He doesn’t rule out running for office again someday, but he knows that as a (very rare) conservative Democrat, the party machine and mainstream media will always operate against him. He does, however, have a warning for the Democratic Party:

“Unless the Democrats put forth a fiscally responsible candidate, we’re going to lose again,” he said. “I don’t think the Democratic machine’s candidate is going to beat Christie. But a good fiscally conservative democrat has a chance!”

Carl versus Goliath

dennis_mikolay_09While the media has long been criticized as biased, their political affiliation and ideological polarization has become even more dreadfully obvious in recent years. During election season, pundits, newspapers, and TV networks often choose which candidates they will support long before any official endorsement is made; for several months, that candidate’s propaganda is broadcast under the guise of journalism.

Former Glen Ridge Mayor Carl Bergmanson knows of the media’s bias better than most people. He has spent his entire political career rocking the political boat, often disrupting the inherently corrupt status quo in the face of opposition from the mainstream media.

Bergmanson’s first clash with the political elite occurred in 1990. His hometown had long operated under single-party rule; the Civic Conference Committee controlled the town’s politics, and only their candidates were considered viable. The organization, however, was extremely exclusive and rarely effectively served the public’s needs.

“When I first took on the Civic Conference Committee, they met in secret,” said Bergmanson. “I said to myself: ‘no wonder the city council is not representative, it isn’t a representative system of government!”

Despite an uphill battle, Bergmanson was elected to the borough council as an independent; his victory was unprecedented. In 2003, he made history when he was elected mayor, marking the first time since 1913 a Civic Conference Committee candidate had lost a mayoral election.

Bergmanson, however, soon set his sights beyond the borders of Glen Ridge. By 2008, Governor Jon Corzine had become wildly unpopular: the state was on the brink of a financial crisis, property taxes were rising exponentially, and it seemed that serving the special interests had become Trenton’s top priority.

Bergmanson became the chairman of The Committee to Recall Jon Corzine and was soon among one of the most vocal critics of Governor Corzine.

“It was more than just him doing a bad job as governor,” said Bergmanson. “He broke a bond of trust. He talked about making Constitutional changes we needed to have made. We had a special session of legislature, and he promised if it didn’t work he would hold a constitutional convention…This was a very important issue to me, because we wont solve property tax problems until we solve these constitutional issues. He promised this to me personally when I met with him and he broke that promise.”

The media shunned Bergmanson’s effort to recall Corzine and completely ignored the entire endeavor. Without any coverage, the already difficult task of collecting the required signatures became impossible.

“We would have had to have 400,000 notarized signatures,” said Bergmanson. “It is set up to be impossible.”

By 2009, Governor Corzine was gearing up to seek re-election. Bergmanson, not content to sit idly by and watch Corzine sail to victory, began to consider running for office yet again. During an appearance on NJ101.5FM’s Jim Gearhart Show, Bergmanson announced he would challenge Governor Corzine in the Democratic Primaries because “it needed to be done.”

The media and the Democratic Party made it clear almost instantaneously they would not support this act of insubordination. Bergmanson would have to challenge Corzine’s vast financial resources and political connections. The Democratic elite were so aghast that anyone would challenge their flagship candidate that they tried to squash Bergmanson’s campaign. Bergmanson was not invited to Democratic Party events or conventions, and while Republican candidates Steve Lonegan and Chris Christie squared off in a series of public debates, Corzine never appeared alongside Bergmanson.

“We got so little coverage,” said Bergmanson. “The editor at the Star Ledger actually said point blank that he wouldn’t cover my campaign.”

Amidst a media blackout, and with the entire Democratic machine running against him, Bergmanson still managed to receive nine percent of the vote in the primary.

“I was very happy with that,” said Bergmanson. “We got virtually no coverage, and still we got nine percent. I was very gratified, because I had met with a lot of folks who saw I was talking about making changes that actually would make a positive changes in their lives.”

While Bergmanson has re-entered private life, he still keeps a close eye on politics. He doesn’t rule out running for office again someday, but he knows that as a (very rare) conservative Democrat, the party machine and mainstream media will always operate against him. He does, however, have a warning for the Democratic Party:

“Unless the Democrats put forth a fiscally responsible candidate, we’re going to lose again,” he said. “I don’t think the Democratic machine’s candidate is going to beat Christie. But a good fiscally conservative democrat has a chance!”

Musicians on a Mission to Benefit Homeless

RED BANK, NJ – “Chicks With Picks:  Women with a Passion for Music” are appearing February 12th at NovelTeas on Bridge Ave. in Red Bank, sponsored by a newly formed non-profit, Musicians on a Mission, at a benefit for Family Promise of Monmouth County, the county’s only homeless shelter for families.

This is the fourth benefit held by Musicians on a Mission, which donates its musical services to worthy local causes.

“We’re looking to support small charities in the Monmouth County area,” said Jenny Woods, who started the group in early November with the help of a large community of local musicians.  Within a short time, the group’s Facebook page garnered more than 300 members.

Three popular local musicians are featured on the bill: Aster Pheonyx, Jo Wymer, and Laura Crisci.

MOAM has raised money and food donations for The Food Bank of Monmouth and Ocean County, for Epiphany House and for the Homelesss Veterans of Monmouth County. In addition to hosting its own fundraisers, the group also matches its volunteer musicians to fundraisers needing entertainment.

“We’re excited to work with this wonderful new group,” said Shanna Goldstein, executive director. “They are providing a needed service for the non-profit community. Finding musicians for our events has never been an easy task, and we are grateful that these talented musicians are using their gifts for the greater good.”

 

About Family Promise of Monmouth County

Family Promise is the only shelter for homeless families in Monmouth County. It is committed to helping low-income families attain lasting independence. Since 2001 it has served 147 families–totaling 435 individuals, with 186 adults and 249 children. It boasts a success rate of permanency (the number of graduates of the shelter program who move into permanent housing) of 80 percent.  This is achieved by providing safe shelter, meals, and support services for homeless families and through programs designed to address the underlying causes of homelessness. For more information, visit our website, http://www.familypromisemc.org

Musicians on a Mission to Benefit Homeless

RED BANK, NJ – “Chicks With Picks:  Women with a Passion for Music” are appearing February 12th at NovelTeas on Bridge Ave. in Red Bank, sponsored by a newly formed non-profit, Musicians on a Mission, at a benefit for Family Promise of Monmouth County, the county’s only homeless shelter for families.

This is the fourth benefit held by Musicians on a Mission, which donates its musical services to worthy local causes.

“We’re looking to support small charities in the Monmouth County area,” said Jenny Woods, who started the group in early November with the help of a large community of local musicians.  Within a short time, the group’s Facebook page garnered more than 300 members.

Three popular local musicians are featured on the bill: Aster Pheonyx, Jo Wymer, and Laura Crisci.

MOAM has raised money and food donations for The Food Bank of Monmouth and Ocean County, for Epiphany House and for the Homelesss Veterans of Monmouth County. In addition to hosting its own fundraisers, the group also matches its volunteer musicians to fundraisers needing entertainment.

“We’re excited to work with this wonderful new group,” said Shanna Goldstein, executive director. “They are providing a needed service for the non-profit community. Finding musicians for our events has never been an easy task, and we are grateful that these talented musicians are using their gifts for the greater good.”

 

About Family Promise of Monmouth County

Family Promise is the only shelter for homeless families in Monmouth County. It is committed to helping low-income families attain lasting independence. Since 2001 it has served 147 families–totaling 435 individuals, with 186 adults and 249 children. It boasts a success rate of permanency (the number of graduates of the shelter program who move into permanent housing) of 80 percent.  This is achieved by providing safe shelter, meals, and support services for homeless families and through programs designed to address the underlying causes of homelessness. For more information, visit our website, http://www.familypromisemc.org

Macfie to Preach at Atlantic Highlands Presbyterian Feb 6

ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS, NJ – The Rev. Barbara A. MacFie will be the guest speaker Sunday, Feb. 6, at the First Presbyterian Church. She will also administer Communion during the 10 a.m. service.

Her sermon is entitled “Blind Faith,” a message ab out Presbyterians’ obligation to carry the ministry out into the world and to be compassionate and loving to all others.

The church will continue its special first-Sunday-of-the-month children’s program, which is held when Sunday School is in recess. Regular Sunday School classes will resume on Sunday, Feb. 13.

MacFie has been an ordained Presbyterian minister for 12 years and is a counselor who concentrates her efforts on her private practice at Phoenix Counseling Center, Metuchen, where she lives. She has also filled in at various New Jersey churches.

She is a graduate of Monmouth University’s Psychological Counseling Program and holds a degree from Princeton Theological Seminary. Prior to seminary, she served as a U.S. Army chaplain’s assistant in Germany and Saudi Arabia and at Fort Monmouth.

The Rev. Michael Riley, minister, author and Asbury Park Press columnist, will be the guest preacher on Feb 13, 20 and 27. MacFie will return to the pulpit on March 6.

All area residents, including children, are welcome at the 121-year-old, handicapped accessible church at Third and E. Highland Aves. Child care is provided during all Sunday worship services.

Macfie to Preach at Atlantic Highlands Presbyterian Feb 6

ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS, NJ – The Rev. Barbara A. MacFie will be the guest speaker Sunday, Feb. 6, at the First Presbyterian Church. She will also administer Communion during the 10 a.m. service.

Her sermon is entitled “Blind Faith,” a message ab out Presbyterians’ obligation to carry the ministry out into the world and to be compassionate and loving to all others.

The church will continue its special first-Sunday-of-the-month children’s program, which is held when Sunday School is in recess. Regular Sunday School classes will resume on Sunday, Feb. 13.

MacFie has been an ordained Presbyterian minister for 12 years and is a counselor who concentrates her efforts on her private practice at Phoenix Counseling Center, Metuchen, where she lives. She has also filled in at various New Jersey churches.

She is a graduate of Monmouth University’s Psychological Counseling Program and holds a degree from Princeton Theological Seminary. Prior to seminary, she served as a U.S. Army chaplain’s assistant in Germany and Saudi Arabia and at Fort Monmouth.

The Rev. Michael Riley, minister, author and Asbury Park Press columnist, will be the guest preacher on Feb 13, 20 and 27. MacFie will return to the pulpit on March 6.

All area residents, including children, are welcome at the 121-year-old, handicapped accessible church at Third and E. Highland Aves. Child care is provided during all Sunday worship services.