Henry Hudson Regional School District Budget Calls for Zero Increase

HIGHLANDS, NJ – Dr. Vincent J. Capraro, Interim Superintendent, reported that the Henry Hudson Regional School District willpresent to the public a zero percent increase in the tax levy of Highlands and Atlantic Highlands.

After careful consideration and an increase in State and Federal Aid, Janet Sherlock, Business Administrator, wasable to maintain the existing programs in the district. The tentative budget for 2011-2012 of $9,689,239.00 is adecrease of $193,344 from the 2010-2011 budget. Shared services among the Tri-District (Atlantic Highlands,Highlands and Henry Hudson) will enable the district to balance this year’s school budget.

On April 27, 2011 the citizens will be voting on the Henry Hudson Regional School District budget and will beselecting three members to the Board of Education. Running unopposed from the Highlands is Cheryl McDonald.Atlantic Highlands will select two of three candidates, Sarah Kroon Chiles, Robert Thuss, Jr. and Arthur Weimer(incumbent).

Henry Hudson Regional School District Budget Calls for Zero Increase

HIGHLANDS, NJ – Dr. Vincent J. Capraro, Interim Superintendent, reported that the Henry Hudson Regional School District willpresent to the public a zero percent increase in the tax levy of Highlands and Atlantic Highlands.

After careful consideration and an increase in State and Federal Aid, Janet Sherlock, Business Administrator, wasable to maintain the existing programs in the district. The tentative budget for 2011-2012 of $9,689,239.00 is adecrease of $193,344 from the 2010-2011 budget. Shared services among the Tri-District (Atlantic Highlands,Highlands and Henry Hudson) will enable the district to balance this year’s school budget.

On April 27, 2011 the citizens will be voting on the Henry Hudson Regional School District budget and will beselecting three members to the Board of Education. Running unopposed from the Highlands is Cheryl McDonald.Atlantic Highlands will select two of three candidates, Sarah Kroon Chiles, Robert Thuss, Jr. and Arthur Weimer(incumbent).

Monmouth County Arts Council to Benefit from Two Rivers Food & Wine Tasting

RED BANK, NJ – The non-profit Monmouth County Arts Council serving the Monmouth and Ocean County communities since 1971 has been selected as the beneficiary of the Red Bank Rotary’s Eleventh Annual 

Two Rivers Food and Wine Tasting to be held on Monday, April 11 at Branches Catering in West Long Branch, from 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.

The Monmouth County Arts Council (MCAC, www.monmoutharts.org) celebrating 40 years of service is the official County Arts Agency. The MCAC works with artists, arts groups, municipalities, social service, community groups and the public to ensure that the arts are incorporated into all aspects of the community. MCAC’s programs and the groups it supports serve over 745,000 people each year and support over 2,728 arts events in Monmouth County.

“For the past 10 years the Red Bank Rotary, through the Red Bank Rotary Foundation, has sponsored the Two Rivers Food & Wine Tasting, enabling us to donate over $225,000 to local charities,” says Red Bank Rotary President Chuck Watson. “Past recipients include the Community YMCA, VNA of Central Jersey, Parker Family Health Center, Love INC, Jewish Children & Family Services, Collier Services, Holiday Express, HABcore, Lunch Break and the Affordable Housing Alliance.”

The Monmouth County Arts Council will receive the entire net proceeds from the event. “We are honored that the Red Bank Rotary has selected the Monmouth County Arts Council as the beneficiary of this year’s event,” says Mary Eileen Fouratt, MCAC’s Executive Director. “These funds will enable us to ensure that everyone in the county can participate in and enjoy low cost and free concerts, film festivals, plays, community art projects, and dance in their own backyard.  Especially in difficult economic times, the arts lift spirits, inspire creativity, contribute to the economy, and builds community. We are grateful to the Red Bank Rotary for recognizing the importance of the arts to our community, especially in our 40th anniversary year.” 

The Two Rivers Food and Wine Tasting event has grown to be a fun and prestigious networking event. Each year approximately 350 guests savor samplings from more than 25 of the area’s best restaurants, food purveyors, and beer, wine, and spirits distributors. Reservations are $65 per person. For reservations please call 732-933-9111, e-mail [email protected] or visit www.redbankrotary.org.

Monmouth County Arts Council to Benefit from Two Rivers Food & Wine Tasting

RED BANK, NJ – The non-profit Monmouth County Arts Council serving the Monmouth and Ocean County communities since 1971 has been selected as the beneficiary of the Red Bank Rotary’s Eleventh Annual 

Two Rivers Food and Wine Tasting to be held on Monday, April 11 at Branches Catering in West Long Branch, from 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.

The Monmouth County Arts Council (MCAC, www.monmoutharts.org) celebrating 40 years of service is the official County Arts Agency. The MCAC works with artists, arts groups, municipalities, social service, community groups and the public to ensure that the arts are incorporated into all aspects of the community. MCAC’s programs and the groups it supports serve over 745,000 people each year and support over 2,728 arts events in Monmouth County.

“For the past 10 years the Red Bank Rotary, through the Red Bank Rotary Foundation, has sponsored the Two Rivers Food & Wine Tasting, enabling us to donate over $225,000 to local charities,” says Red Bank Rotary President Chuck Watson. “Past recipients include the Community YMCA, VNA of Central Jersey, Parker Family Health Center, Love INC, Jewish Children & Family Services, Collier Services, Holiday Express, HABcore, Lunch Break and the Affordable Housing Alliance.”

The Monmouth County Arts Council will receive the entire net proceeds from the event. “We are honored that the Red Bank Rotary has selected the Monmouth County Arts Council as the beneficiary of this year’s event,” says Mary Eileen Fouratt, MCAC’s Executive Director. “These funds will enable us to ensure that everyone in the county can participate in and enjoy low cost and free concerts, film festivals, plays, community art projects, and dance in their own backyard.  Especially in difficult economic times, the arts lift spirits, inspire creativity, contribute to the economy, and builds community. We are grateful to the Red Bank Rotary for recognizing the importance of the arts to our community, especially in our 40th anniversary year.” 

The Two Rivers Food and Wine Tasting event has grown to be a fun and prestigious networking event. Each year approximately 350 guests savor samplings from more than 25 of the area’s best restaurants, food purveyors, and beer, wine, and spirits distributors. Reservations are $65 per person. For reservations please call 732-933-9111, e-mail [email protected] or visit www.redbankrotary.org.

No Mandate to Preserve Ft. Hancock

Due to the Sandy Hook Foundation’s latest statements wherein its members falsely proclaimed that the preservation of the Ft. Hancock buildings is the primary mission of the National Park Service at Sandy Hook, I must once again correct the Sandy Hook Foundation,

Contrary to what the Sandy Hook Foundation would have the public believe, there is no mandate for the National Park Service to preserve the Ft. Hancock buildings.  This sobering fact was verified for Congressman Frank Pallone, and my wife and me, by the Congressman’s chief staffer from his Washington, D.C. office, over 6 years ago.

When the Congressman heard his staffer confirm what we had told him that no directive or mandate existed for the preservation of the Ft. Hancock buildings, Congressman Pallone was shocked.  So much so, that he asked his staffer to repeat her findings.  She did, and her response remained the same:  There was no mandate for the National Park Service to preserve the Ft. Hancock buildings.

Congressman Pallone was amazed and appalled..  He said he had been misled by local preservationists.

If the Sandy Hook Foundation’s position that Ft. Hancock building preservation was indeed its primary mission at Sandy Hook, the National Park Service would be guilty of malfeasance and dereliction of duty for the last 36 years. As evidenced by the demolition by neglect suffered by the Ft. Hancock buildings while under its questionable stewardship, the National Park Service, instead, has shown itself responsible of being dreadfully ineffective.

The Sandy Hook Foundation’s attempt to use court decisions to support (prop up) their desire to “preserve the Ft. Hancock buildings at any cost”, was inappropriate and misleading.  The decisions in question dealt with preserving national park land, flora and fauna from the ravages of detrimental recreational activities, such as “all terrain vehicle” (ATV) and snow mobile use.  But the Sandy Hook Foundation failed (purposely so as to mislead the public?) to recognize this very important difference of what the courts were seeking to protect and preserve, the land, not buildings,

The reputation and believability of the Sandy Hook Foundation appears to be suffering based upon its latest action relating to the Ft. Hancock buildings. 

Peter P. O’Such, Jr.

Fair Haven, NJ

No Mandate to Preserve Ft. Hancock

Due to the Sandy Hook Foundation’s latest statements wherein its members falsely proclaimed that the preservation of the Ft. Hancock buildings is the primary mission of the National Park Service at Sandy Hook, I must once again correct the Sandy Hook Foundation,

Contrary to what the Sandy Hook Foundation would have the public believe, there is no mandate for the National Park Service to preserve the Ft. Hancock buildings.  This sobering fact was verified for Congressman Frank Pallone, and my wife and me, by the Congressman’s chief staffer from his Washington, D.C. office, over 6 years ago.

When the Congressman heard his staffer confirm what we had told him that no directive or mandate existed for the preservation of the Ft. Hancock buildings, Congressman Pallone was shocked.  So much so, that he asked his staffer to repeat her findings.  She did, and her response remained the same:  There was no mandate for the National Park Service to preserve the Ft. Hancock buildings.

Congressman Pallone was amazed and appalled..  He said he had been misled by local preservationists.

If the Sandy Hook Foundation’s position that Ft. Hancock building preservation was indeed its primary mission at Sandy Hook, the National Park Service would be guilty of malfeasance and dereliction of duty for the last 36 years. As evidenced by the demolition by neglect suffered by the Ft. Hancock buildings while under its questionable stewardship, the National Park Service, instead, has shown itself responsible of being dreadfully ineffective.

The Sandy Hook Foundation’s attempt to use court decisions to support (prop up) their desire to “preserve the Ft. Hancock buildings at any cost”, was inappropriate and misleading.  The decisions in question dealt with preserving national park land, flora and fauna from the ravages of detrimental recreational activities, such as “all terrain vehicle” (ATV) and snow mobile use.  But the Sandy Hook Foundation failed (purposely so as to mislead the public?) to recognize this very important difference of what the courts were seeking to protect and preserve, the land, not buildings,

The reputation and believability of the Sandy Hook Foundation appears to be suffering based upon its latest action relating to the Ft. Hancock buildings. 

Peter P. O’Such, Jr.

Fair Haven, NJ

AH Police Report – March 30, 2011

ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS, NJ – Atlantic Highlands Police Chief Jerry Vasto reports the following activity:

On March 22, 2011 at 9:45 P.M., a business owner reported one of his vehicles had been egged while parked on Avenue A near South Avenue. Police responded and questioned several adults who had been observed in the South Avenue Park, after hours. The subjects questioned denied any involvement in the egging. As a result of the questioning, Daniel Fredrick, age 20, Freehold, was arrested on a contempt of court warrant issued by the Highlands Municipal Court. Dylan Herbert, age 19, Highlands; and Fiona Gallagher, age 19, Highlands, were issued summonses for being in the park after dark. Patrolman Steven Doherty was the arresting Officer, assisted by Captain David Rossbach and Patrolman Adam Gurian.

On March, 25, 2011 at 7:37 A.M., Patrolman Stephen Vogt stopped a local roofer’s truck in an effort to apprehend, Keith Walling, age 28, Leonardo, who was wanted in connection with the theft of $ 1000.00 worth of copper down spouts taken off of an East Highland Avenue residence. Police received a tip that Walling was employed by the roofer. When stopped, Walling used his deceased brother’s name and date of birth. Investigation revealed he was using a false name. Walling was arrested without incident by Vogt with the assistance of Sergeant Alfred Conover and Patrolman Christopher Inglis. While in custody, Walling admitted committing an additional theft of aluminum from an Ocean Boulevard residence. Walling was processed and released on $ 17,500.00 bail. Police are still looking for Walling’s accomplice in the copper theft, Richard C. Johnson Jr, age 39, of Atlantic Highlands. Johnson is known to work as a mason for local contractors. Police are asking for information regarding Johnson’s whereabouts. Please phone 732-291-1212 with tips regarding Johnson’s whereabouts. All tips will remain confidential.

On March 25, 2011 at 6:14 P.M., Captain David Rossbach stopped Ian E. Heflin, age 19, Fair Haven, for a traffic violation on Highway # 36. Heflin was found to be in possession of the hallucinogen, LSD, and was placed under arrest. He was processed and released on his own recognizance.

On March 27, 2011 at 1:43 A.M., Patrolman Adam Gurian stopped a vehicle for speeding on First Avenue. Subsequent to the stop, a passenger, Eric Johnson, age 23, Leonardo, was arrested on a warrant issued by the Atlantic Highlands Municipal Court. Johnson posted the required bail and was released.

On March 29, 2011 at 9:44 A.M., Patrolman Brian Phair stopped Jasmine Pham, age 31, Somerset, for speeding on Memorial Parkway. Subsequent to the stop, Pham was arrested on a warrant issued by the Plainsboro Township Municipal Court. Pham posted the required bail and was released.

AH Police Report – March 30, 2011

ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS, NJ – Atlantic Highlands Police Chief Jerry Vasto reports the following activity:

On March 22, 2011 at 9:45 P.M., a business owner reported one of his vehicles had been egged while parked on Avenue A near South Avenue. Police responded and questioned several adults who had been observed in the South Avenue Park, after hours. The subjects questioned denied any involvement in the egging. As a result of the questioning, Daniel Fredrick, age 20, Freehold, was arrested on a contempt of court warrant issued by the Highlands Municipal Court. Dylan Herbert, age 19, Highlands; and Fiona Gallagher, age 19, Highlands, were issued summonses for being in the park after dark. Patrolman Steven Doherty was the arresting Officer, assisted by Captain David Rossbach and Patrolman Adam Gurian.

On March, 25, 2011 at 7:37 A.M., Patrolman Stephen Vogt stopped a local roofer’s truck in an effort to apprehend, Keith Walling, age 28, Leonardo, who was wanted in connection with the theft of $ 1000.00 worth of copper down spouts taken off of an East Highland Avenue residence. Police received a tip that Walling was employed by the roofer. When stopped, Walling used his deceased brother’s name and date of birth. Investigation revealed he was using a false name. Walling was arrested without incident by Vogt with the assistance of Sergeant Alfred Conover and Patrolman Christopher Inglis. While in custody, Walling admitted committing an additional theft of aluminum from an Ocean Boulevard residence. Walling was processed and released on $ 17,500.00 bail. Police are still looking for Walling’s accomplice in the copper theft, Richard C. Johnson Jr, age 39, of Atlantic Highlands. Johnson is known to work as a mason for local contractors. Police are asking for information regarding Johnson’s whereabouts. Please phone 732-291-1212 with tips regarding Johnson’s whereabouts. All tips will remain confidential.

On March 25, 2011 at 6:14 P.M., Captain David Rossbach stopped Ian E. Heflin, age 19, Fair Haven, for a traffic violation on Highway # 36. Heflin was found to be in possession of the hallucinogen, LSD, and was placed under arrest. He was processed and released on his own recognizance.

On March 27, 2011 at 1:43 A.M., Patrolman Adam Gurian stopped a vehicle for speeding on First Avenue. Subsequent to the stop, a passenger, Eric Johnson, age 23, Leonardo, was arrested on a warrant issued by the Atlantic Highlands Municipal Court. Johnson posted the required bail and was released.

On March 29, 2011 at 9:44 A.M., Patrolman Brian Phair stopped Jasmine Pham, age 31, Somerset, for speeding on Memorial Parkway. Subsequent to the stop, Pham was arrested on a warrant issued by the Plainsboro Township Municipal Court. Pham posted the required bail and was released.

Mardi Gras Celebrated in RFHRHS World Language Classes

French National Honor Society Presented Mardi Gras Experiences

RUMSON, NJ – Who knew that there was so much culture and vocabulary inherent in the celebration of Mardi Gras? Each year on the Tuesday before Ash Wednesday, often called “Fat Tuesday,” Mardi Gras is celebrated as a renewal of spring and a last chance to overindulge before the beginning of Lent on the following day. “Fat Tuesday” was named for the custom of saving fats in order to make greasy deep fried foods which, along with other sweet things, were to be given up on the following day for Lent.  RFH French Honor Society members researched Mardi Gras customs and presented lessons and a mini-Mardi Gras experience to underclassmen in the French and Spanish II and III classes. 

rfh_mardi_gras_1

Katie Burpee found the babiole in her serving of King cake and was named Queen in Mme. Fortier’s Spanish II class of freshman students. Seated L to R:  Margaret Heintzelman and Katie Burpee  Standing L to R: Haley Rosset, Tori Keller, Chris Veasey, Mme. Assassi and Sophia Minassian

Adorned with beads and bright feather boas, the advanced students presented an informative slide show and introduced vocabulary words that described various aspects of Mardi Gras. From Les Cohleurs de Mardi Gras (Le violet, le vert) to un feau de joie (bonfire) to un babiole (the word that describes the beads and trinkets that adorn revelers) the vocabulary words were written down to be used in a game of “Mardi Gras Lotto” (Bingo) that followed the lessons. Students decorated pre-made masks while a traditional Mardi Gras King cake was cut into serving pieces. According to custom, un babiole was baked into each cake, and the student who found it was crowned King or Queen of the celebration, a custom that exemplified the role reversal typical in Mardi Gras celebrations. An interesting extra lesson happened when the French students introduced their vocabulary words to a Spanish class. It turned out that many of the words were similar and, in some cases, nearly identical. Even the teachers were surprised by the similarity.

rfh_mardi_gras_2

Mardi Gras was celebrated in Mr. Seth Herman’s Spanish II class of freshmen. L to R: Mr. Herman, Mme. Rebecca Assassi, French National Honor Society Advisor, Jackie Guzman, Chris Veasey and Alexandra Miele enjoyed traditional King’s cake.

Mardi Gras is a happy time that celebrates spring and over-the top-indulgence, and studying it gave students of French and Spanish the opportunity to learn vocabulary and customs from the homelands of their languages.

Mardi Gras Celebrated in RFHRHS World Language Classes

French National Honor Society Presented Mardi Gras Experiences

RUMSON, NJ – Who knew that there was so much culture and vocabulary inherent in the celebration of Mardi Gras? Each year on the Tuesday before Ash Wednesday, often called “Fat Tuesday,” Mardi Gras is celebrated as a renewal of spring and a last chance to overindulge before the beginning of Lent on the following day. “Fat Tuesday” was named for the custom of saving fats in order to make greasy deep fried foods which, along with other sweet things, were to be given up on the following day for Lent.  RFH French Honor Society members researched Mardi Gras customs and presented lessons and a mini-Mardi Gras experience to underclassmen in the French and Spanish II and III classes. 

rfh_mardi_gras_1

Katie Burpee found the babiole in her serving of King cake and was named Queen in Mme. Fortier’s Spanish II class of freshman students. Seated L to R:  Margaret Heintzelman and Katie Burpee  Standing L to R: Haley Rosset, Tori Keller, Chris Veasey, Mme. Assassi and Sophia Minassian

Adorned with beads and bright feather boas, the advanced students presented an informative slide show and introduced vocabulary words that described various aspects of Mardi Gras. From Les Cohleurs de Mardi Gras (Le violet, le vert) to un feau de joie (bonfire) to un babiole (the word that describes the beads and trinkets that adorn revelers) the vocabulary words were written down to be used in a game of “Mardi Gras Lotto” (Bingo) that followed the lessons. Students decorated pre-made masks while a traditional Mardi Gras King cake was cut into serving pieces. According to custom, un babiole was baked into each cake, and the student who found it was crowned King or Queen of the celebration, a custom that exemplified the role reversal typical in Mardi Gras celebrations. An interesting extra lesson happened when the French students introduced their vocabulary words to a Spanish class. It turned out that many of the words were similar and, in some cases, nearly identical. Even the teachers were surprised by the similarity.

rfh_mardi_gras_2

Mardi Gras was celebrated in Mr. Seth Herman’s Spanish II class of freshmen. L to R: Mr. Herman, Mme. Rebecca Assassi, French National Honor Society Advisor, Jackie Guzman, Chris Veasey and Alexandra Miele enjoyed traditional King’s cake.

Mardi Gras is a happy time that celebrates spring and over-the top-indulgence, and studying it gave students of French and Spanish the opportunity to learn vocabulary and customs from the homelands of their languages.