Review – A Dangerous Method

david_prown_120To top off a great Christmas day, I needed to see a movie. So I took two naps and had 3 cups of caffeinated tea to ensure I won’t fall asleep. Alas, I snoozed again.

Anyway, for the 1st hour this intriguing movie really held my interest.

I didn’t know really what this film was about except that there was some sort of struggle/relationship between two of the greatest psycho-analyists ever… Freud and Jung over one of their patients (Keira Knightley).

She has come a long way since “Bend it Like Beckham” and her acting in this film was top shelf. Neat also that she looked far from beautiful in this film so it didn’t detract.

The professional language/conversations in this film, though at a very intellectual level, was somehow not that hard to follow. This 1st hour of the film really had me locked in and the next thing I knew I was snoozing. Only 99 minutes long, my bad.

Was a really good film and at the end was intrigued to learn that all the characters were real and to learn of their history.

The title is the story and I don’t want to give away.

Go see!

Review – A Dangerous Method

david_prown_120To top off a great Christmas day, I needed to see a movie. So I took two naps and had 3 cups of caffeinated tea to ensure I won’t fall asleep. Alas, I snoozed again.

Anyway, for the 1st hour this intriguing movie really held my interest.

I didn’t know really what this film was about except that there was some sort of struggle/relationship between two of the greatest psycho-analyists ever… Freud and Jung over one of their patients (Keira Knightley).

She has come a long way since “Bend it Like Beckham” and her acting in this film was top shelf. Neat also that she looked far from beautiful in this film so it didn’t detract.

The professional language/conversations in this film, though at a very intellectual level, was somehow not that hard to follow. This 1st hour of the film really had me locked in and the next thing I knew I was snoozing. Only 99 minutes long, my bad.

Was a really good film and at the end was intrigued to learn that all the characters were real and to learn of their history.

The title is the story and I don’t want to give away.

Go see!

Poet Chelsea Yarrow Gould “Live on the Deck” in Atlantic Highlands

ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS, NJ – On Tuesday, January 10, poet and performance artist  Chelsea Yarrow Gould hosts and is featured at the popular Atlantic Highlands Arts Council open mic, “Live on the Deck.” Gould will share her original poetry, paintings, and songs,  accompanied by percussionist Steve Honoshosky. She’ll also introduce other performers and artists. 

Gould, born in Buffalo NY,  is a poet, painter, dancer, and artist who plans to start a women’s performance artists’ collective in Monmouth County. She has performed at the Annex Open Mic, the AHAC Open Mic in Atlantic Highlands, and FilmOneFest.   

ahac_chelsea_yarrow_gould

Chelsea Yarrow Gould

Musicians, artists, poets, filmmakers, all creative souls and all who love good original live performance are invited to share the fun at this friendly, free open mic.  Artists and performers sign up beginning at 7:00 pm, the show starts at 7:30 pm. at On the Deck Restaurant, 10 Simon Lake Drive, in the Atlantic Highlands Municipal Harbor overlooking the Raritan River, Sand Hook Bay,

and the Manhattan Skyline. Refreshments are available to purchase, and tax-deductible donations to the Atlantic Highlands Arts Council are welcome. 

Poet Chelsea Yarrow Gould “Live on the Deck” in Atlantic Highlands

ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS, NJ – On Tuesday, January 10, poet and performance artist  Chelsea Yarrow Gould hosts and is featured at the popular Atlantic Highlands Arts Council open mic, “Live on the Deck.” Gould will share her original poetry, paintings, and songs,  accompanied by percussionist Steve Honoshosky. She’ll also introduce other performers and artists. 

Gould, born in Buffalo NY,  is a poet, painter, dancer, and artist who plans to start a women’s performance artists’ collective in Monmouth County. She has performed at the Annex Open Mic, the AHAC Open Mic in Atlantic Highlands, and FilmOneFest.   

ahac_chelsea_yarrow_gould

Chelsea Yarrow Gould

Musicians, artists, poets, filmmakers, all creative souls and all who love good original live performance are invited to share the fun at this friendly, free open mic.  Artists and performers sign up beginning at 7:00 pm, the show starts at 7:30 pm. at On the Deck Restaurant, 10 Simon Lake Drive, in the Atlantic Highlands Municipal Harbor overlooking the Raritan River, Sand Hook Bay,

and the Manhattan Skyline. Refreshments are available to purchase, and tax-deductible donations to the Atlantic Highlands Arts Council are welcome. 

Knitting Session Offered at Atlantic Highlands Library

ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS, NJ – Knitters, brighten your winter!  Learn about oceanic patterns and discover how to knit beautiful sideways edgings with lifelong knitter, Mary Ann McCormick, on Tuesday, January 10 at 7 PM at the Atlantic Highlands Library, 48 Avenue C, Atlantic Highlands.

A passion for knitting was shared with Mary Ann, who has been teaching throughout Monmouth County for the past four years, by her mother and other family friends.  Another love, that of the ocean, led Ms. McCormick to seek out sea and marine life patterns to be able to share with her students.  This class combines her two loves through her instruction on patterns from the sea. 

Bring medium needles and yarn.  This free class is designed for knitters who can comfortably knit and purl.  For further information, please call the library at 732-291-1956.  The snow date for the event will be: Tuesday, January 17 at 7 PM.  

Knitting Session Offered at Atlantic Highlands Library

ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS, NJ – Knitters, brighten your winter!  Learn about oceanic patterns and discover how to knit beautiful sideways edgings with lifelong knitter, Mary Ann McCormick, on Tuesday, January 10 at 7 PM at the Atlantic Highlands Library, 48 Avenue C, Atlantic Highlands.

A passion for knitting was shared with Mary Ann, who has been teaching throughout Monmouth County for the past four years, by her mother and other family friends.  Another love, that of the ocean, led Ms. McCormick to seek out sea and marine life patterns to be able to share with her students.  This class combines her two loves through her instruction on patterns from the sea. 

Bring medium needles and yarn.  This free class is designed for knitters who can comfortably knit and purl.  For further information, please call the library at 732-291-1956.  The snow date for the event will be: Tuesday, January 17 at 7 PM.  

In Between Times

george_hancockstefanThe week between Christmas and the New Year is usually a vacation week for pastors and church related offices.  Starting with the first Sunday in Advent (which this year started with November 27th) until Christmas Day (another Sunday this year), the church calendar was filled with enjoyable activities. By Christmas Sunday evening I was so exhausted that I did not write my usual church-wide email of Vespers of Praise and Thanksgiving.

On Monday morning I had a brief meeting with a church leader who reminded me that this was my vacation week. This was my week to relax, to be with my family, to visit friends and to stay away from the church office. I did fairly well, with the exception of a funeral happening before the New Year.

Enjoying my relaxed time and good conversations, I was reminded that the whole church’s existence is in between times. When I checked some of my references I found that I remembered an exact quote from George Ladd who writes, “The church lives ‘between the times:’ the old age goes on, but the powers of the new age have irrupted into the old age.” Jesus Christ ushered his Kingdom in when he began his ministry, saying, “Repent for the Kingdom of God is near.” Other translations read: for the kingdom of God has arrived. The presence of Jesus Christ meant that the kingdom of Satan has been attacked. Other scholars have phrased the expression “in, but not yet” to declare that the certainty of the Kingdom is undeniable, but its full force is not here yet.

In between times! The celebration of the birth of Christ creates one pole of the history of the church. The birth of Jesus Christ and his life among us is undeniable.  The human history is just too full of His presence for even the most ardent opponent of Christianity to deny that Christ lived and that the Christian Church has come into existence as a result of his work. The Christian Church varies in presence and strength, but it continues to exist not because it exists unto itself but because it declares that something else is coming.

The One who is coming has come already. Jesus Christ has come the first time and after His resurrection He told His disciples that He is coming again.  The Christian Church is a part of His Kingdom. The presence of the Christian Church is the messenger of the in between times.

Paul writes that God sent his son in the fullness of time.  Jesus came into the world not a day late or a week early. He came in the precise time of God.  We do not know when Jesus Christ is coming again, but He will come in the fullness of time. We live in between times, waiting for the new time that Jesus will usher in at His second coming.

In Between Times

george_hancockstefanThe week between Christmas and the New Year is usually a vacation week for pastors and church related offices.  Starting with the first Sunday in Advent (which this year started with November 27th) until Christmas Day (another Sunday this year), the church calendar was filled with enjoyable activities. By Christmas Sunday evening I was so exhausted that I did not write my usual church-wide email of Vespers of Praise and Thanksgiving.

On Monday morning I had a brief meeting with a church leader who reminded me that this was my vacation week. This was my week to relax, to be with my family, to visit friends and to stay away from the church office. I did fairly well, with the exception of a funeral happening before the New Year.

Enjoying my relaxed time and good conversations, I was reminded that the whole church’s existence is in between times. When I checked some of my references I found that I remembered an exact quote from George Ladd who writes, “The church lives ‘between the times:’ the old age goes on, but the powers of the new age have irrupted into the old age.” Jesus Christ ushered his Kingdom in when he began his ministry, saying, “Repent for the Kingdom of God is near.” Other translations read: for the kingdom of God has arrived. The presence of Jesus Christ meant that the kingdom of Satan has been attacked. Other scholars have phrased the expression “in, but not yet” to declare that the certainty of the Kingdom is undeniable, but its full force is not here yet.

In between times! The celebration of the birth of Christ creates one pole of the history of the church. The birth of Jesus Christ and his life among us is undeniable.  The human history is just too full of His presence for even the most ardent opponent of Christianity to deny that Christ lived and that the Christian Church has come into existence as a result of his work. The Christian Church varies in presence and strength, but it continues to exist not because it exists unto itself but because it declares that something else is coming.

The One who is coming has come already. Jesus Christ has come the first time and after His resurrection He told His disciples that He is coming again.  The Christian Church is a part of His Kingdom. The presence of the Christian Church is the messenger of the in between times.

Paul writes that God sent his son in the fullness of time.  Jesus came into the world not a day late or a week early. He came in the precise time of God.  We do not know when Jesus Christ is coming again, but He will come in the fullness of time. We live in between times, waiting for the new time that Jesus will usher in at His second coming.

Searching for Understanding: Part 2

danvance_120Last column, I introduced you to “Joshua,” a deaf man in his 40s currently serving a lengthy prison sentence, in part for trying to illegally buy marijuana. His sister “Cindy,” who I interviewed, believed much of her brother’s legal problems in great measure have been due to his inability to understand and communicate well in English. In other words, he hasn’t been able to fully understand the law. Today, sitting in a prison cell, he now fully understands the specific laws he broke, but that understanding hasn’t helped him navigate prison life. There is still so much he doesn’t understand.

For starters, Cindy said this about Joshua’s initial intake at local jail: “Imagine you’ve been arrested and are going to jail. They’re taking off your clothes, cutting your hair, and giving you medical exams in which they touch and probe all the orifices. Now imagine having to do that with people who can’t talk your language. They didn’t have an interpreter there saying what they would be doing to him and why.”

Later, in state prison, Joshua’s fears increased. First, he couldn’t hear the prison rules explained and no video of the rules was played. When prisoners were outside, the guards rang a bell to prod the prisoners into lining up before herding them in. Being deaf, Joshua couldn’t hear the bell and was disciplined several times for not lining up. Also, the prison has only sound alarms to alert prisoners to fire. At home, he feared fire and had a visual alarm.

“And during one medical check-up,” added Cindy, “the doctor wanted to take blood and there was no (sign language) interpreter to explain why. (Joshua) didn’t know if the needle was clean and he wanted to see it come out of the package himself because he thought it could have AIDS. He couldn’t get the doctor to understand him. When refusing to have his blood drawn, he got disciplined again. Anyone should have the right to question those things.”

Cindy asked the warden for an interpreter, but to no avail. A few months ago, Joshua became so frustrated in being unable to understand prison life he got into a fistfight, which led to his sentence being extended. Cindy said prisoners speaking non-English languages (including sign language) should have interpreters available to help prisoners comply with rules and to make prisons a safer place.

Contact: danieljvance.com [Blue Valley Sod and Palmer Bus Service make this column possible.]

Daniel J. Vance is a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) and Nationally Certified Counselor (NCC).

Searching for Understanding: Part 2

danvance_120Last column, I introduced you to “Joshua,” a deaf man in his 40s currently serving a lengthy prison sentence, in part for trying to illegally buy marijuana. His sister “Cindy,” who I interviewed, believed much of her brother’s legal problems in great measure have been due to his inability to understand and communicate well in English. In other words, he hasn’t been able to fully understand the law. Today, sitting in a prison cell, he now fully understands the specific laws he broke, but that understanding hasn’t helped him navigate prison life. There is still so much he doesn’t understand.

For starters, Cindy said this about Joshua’s initial intake at local jail: “Imagine you’ve been arrested and are going to jail. They’re taking off your clothes, cutting your hair, and giving you medical exams in which they touch and probe all the orifices. Now imagine having to do that with people who can’t talk your language. They didn’t have an interpreter there saying what they would be doing to him and why.”

Later, in state prison, Joshua’s fears increased. First, he couldn’t hear the prison rules explained and no video of the rules was played. When prisoners were outside, the guards rang a bell to prod the prisoners into lining up before herding them in. Being deaf, Joshua couldn’t hear the bell and was disciplined several times for not lining up. Also, the prison has only sound alarms to alert prisoners to fire. At home, he feared fire and had a visual alarm.

“And during one medical check-up,” added Cindy, “the doctor wanted to take blood and there was no (sign language) interpreter to explain why. (Joshua) didn’t know if the needle was clean and he wanted to see it come out of the package himself because he thought it could have AIDS. He couldn’t get the doctor to understand him. When refusing to have his blood drawn, he got disciplined again. Anyone should have the right to question those things.”

Cindy asked the warden for an interpreter, but to no avail. A few months ago, Joshua became so frustrated in being unable to understand prison life he got into a fistfight, which led to his sentence being extended. Cindy said prisoners speaking non-English languages (including sign language) should have interpreters available to help prisoners comply with rules and to make prisons a safer place.

Contact: danieljvance.com [Blue Valley Sod and Palmer Bus Service make this column possible.]

Daniel J. Vance is a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) and Nationally Certified Counselor (NCC).