Book a Librarian in Middletown

MIDDLETOWN, NJ – Want to learn more about the internet, ebooks, and computer programs?  Are you doing research, and need help finding information?  Get in-depth help with the Middletown Township Public Library’s new “Book a Librarian” service.  Booking a librarian gives individuals a chance to meet one-on-one with a librarian and get personalized assistance and guidance.

Based on your needs, the librarian can help you find good sources of information, tips and solutions. We also offer face-to-face personal training with technology (such as iPads and eReaders).

Each appointment lasts up to 1 hour, and will be scheduled around your needs, as well as librarian expertise and availability.  Additional appointments can be requested with a maximum of one appointment per month.

Continue reading Book a Librarian in Middletown

Book a Librarian in Middletown

MIDDLETOWN, NJ – Want to learn more about the internet, ebooks, and computer programs?  Are you doing research, and need help finding information?  Get in-depth help with the Middletown Township Public Library’s new “Book a Librarian” service.  Booking a librarian gives individuals a chance to meet one-on-one with a librarian and get personalized assistance and guidance.

Based on your needs, the librarian can help you find good sources of information, tips and solutions. We also offer face-to-face personal training with technology (such as iPads and eReaders).

Each appointment lasts up to 1 hour, and will be scheduled around your needs, as well as librarian expertise and availability.  Additional appointments can be requested with a maximum of one appointment per month.

Continue reading Book a Librarian in Middletown

Film Festival Judging June 3rd at Brookdale

Community Invited 

Lincroft, NJ –Brookdale TV and Video Club members have accepted the Friday, June 1st challenge to send out teams of students with the assignment to write, shoot and edit a short film within just 48 hours. Participants will have until 1:00 p.m. Sunday, June 3rd to submit the completed copy of their film. The entries will be premiered Sunday, June 3 beginning at 6:00 p.m.

Films are to be no longer than 10 minutes to be screened and eight minutes or less to qualify for a chance to win prizes.  Genre examples include but are not limited to mystery, horror or comedy and include special parameters. All the films that meet the submission guidelines will be screened and from that group, four films will be selected for awards. Gift cards will be awarded; First place is a $300 card, $150 for Second place and Third place will receive a $50 gift card. An Honorable Mention/Club Choice will also be selected.

The community is invited to attend the Sunday screening. There is a $3 entry fee for adults and free popcorn for everyone.  There is no charge for children, film makers and crew.  Candy and beverages will be available for purchase.

The screening will take place in the Warner Student Life Center Navesink rooms on the Brookdale Community College Lincroft main campus, 765 Newman Springs Road. Parking is most convenient in lots 6 & 7.

For more information, e-mail to: [email protected]  or call Student Life & Activities at 732-224-2500.

Film Festival Judging June 3rd at Brookdale

Community Invited 

Lincroft, NJ –Brookdale TV and Video Club members have accepted the Friday, June 1st challenge to send out teams of students with the assignment to write, shoot and edit a short film within just 48 hours. Participants will have until 1:00 p.m. Sunday, June 3rd to submit the completed copy of their film. The entries will be premiered Sunday, June 3 beginning at 6:00 p.m.

Films are to be no longer than 10 minutes to be screened and eight minutes or less to qualify for a chance to win prizes.  Genre examples include but are not limited to mystery, horror or comedy and include special parameters. All the films that meet the submission guidelines will be screened and from that group, four films will be selected for awards. Gift cards will be awarded; First place is a $300 card, $150 for Second place and Third place will receive a $50 gift card. An Honorable Mention/Club Choice will also be selected.

The community is invited to attend the Sunday screening. There is a $3 entry fee for adults and free popcorn for everyone.  There is no charge for children, film makers and crew.  Candy and beverages will be available for purchase.

The screening will take place in the Warner Student Life Center Navesink rooms on the Brookdale Community College Lincroft main campus, 765 Newman Springs Road. Parking is most convenient in lots 6 & 7.

For more information, e-mail to: [email protected]  or call Student Life & Activities at 732-224-2500.

Eagle Scout Builds Canine Agility Course for Sheriff’s Office

FREEHOLD, NJ – Thanks to the hard work and commitment from a local Boy Scout troop, canines from the Monmouth County Sheriff’s Office are jumping hurdles, climbing stairs and squeezing through low lying areas on their brand new agility course.  Devon Rodgers from Boy Scout Troop 258, Howell Township, came up with the idea to build the project. Rodgers hopes this accomplishment will raise his status to Scouting’s highest rank and honor, Eagle Scout.  “I’m a dog lover, and I knew I wanted to do something for animals, but I also wanted to give back to those in law enforcement who do so much for us,” said 17 year old Rodgers. “That’s why an agility course for canines and their handlers was the perfect project.”

mcso_scout_devon_rodgers
Choong Yim- Troop Leader, Sgt.  Patrick Hamor, Steve Weldon-Troop Leader, Devon Rodgers-Boy Scout, Neil Huy-Troop Leader, Sheriff Shaun Golden, Sheriff’s Officer Joseph Aretino & canine Ari

The project took 335 hours to complete with the help of members and leaders of Troop 258, volunteers, and family and friends.  The Monmouth County Division of Buildings and Grounds donated the materials to build the project. A total of 16 structures were built which include a cat walk, hurdles, low crawl, A frame, broad jump and boxes. “I commend Devon and his entire troop for their dedication and commitment to such an important project,” said Sheriff Shaun Golden. “Agility training is essential for patrol dogs since it builds confidence and self esteem, and, it also maintains the strong bond between a canine and its handler.” 

Continue reading Eagle Scout Builds Canine Agility Course for Sheriff’s Office

Eagle Scout Builds Canine Agility Course for Sheriff’s Office

FREEHOLD, NJ – Thanks to the hard work and commitment from a local Boy Scout troop, canines from the Monmouth County Sheriff’s Office are jumping hurdles, climbing stairs and squeezing through low lying areas on their brand new agility course.  Devon Rodgers from Boy Scout Troop 258, Howell Township, came up with the idea to build the project. Rodgers hopes this accomplishment will raise his status to Scouting’s highest rank and honor, Eagle Scout.  “I’m a dog lover, and I knew I wanted to do something for animals, but I also wanted to give back to those in law enforcement who do so much for us,” said 17 year old Rodgers. “That’s why an agility course for canines and their handlers was the perfect project.”

mcso_scout_devon_rodgers
Choong Yim- Troop Leader, Sgt.  Patrick Hamor, Steve Weldon-Troop Leader, Devon Rodgers-Boy Scout, Neil Huy-Troop Leader, Sheriff Shaun Golden, Sheriff’s Officer Joseph Aretino & canine Ari

The project took 335 hours to complete with the help of members and leaders of Troop 258, volunteers, and family and friends.  The Monmouth County Division of Buildings and Grounds donated the materials to build the project. A total of 16 structures were built which include a cat walk, hurdles, low crawl, A frame, broad jump and boxes. “I commend Devon and his entire troop for their dedication and commitment to such an important project,” said Sheriff Shaun Golden. “Agility training is essential for patrol dogs since it builds confidence and self esteem, and, it also maintains the strong bond between a canine and its handler.” 

Continue reading Eagle Scout Builds Canine Agility Course for Sheriff’s Office

Students Witness Mock Crash, and Meet Real Victims of Drunk Driving in Project Prom Program

Little Silver, NJ –  For the eighth year, Red Bank Regional (RBR) conducted Project Prom to promote their students’ safety during prom weekend.  That is the time when national statistics soar for vehicular accidents involving young people and alcohol. The program, organized by RBR’s resource officer Pete Gibson, began with a graphic mock crash and rescue on the high school campus. Seniors were led to their school’s front parking lot to watch a reenactment of a drunk-driving accident.

            This year, for the first time, students played roles in the mock crash. Jake Cullinane of Tinton Falls portrayed the drunk driver who was led away in handcuffs by the police from a devastating three-car crash. Two other students, Terrence Scanlon, Lincroft, and Anthony Vogel, Middletown, were cut out of the crashed cars with the Jaws of Life operated by Little Silver and Shrewsbury first responders.  Michael’s mother, RBR Administrative Assistance Donna Carotenuto, was spirited into an ambulance after being stabilized in a neck brace. RBR teacher Scott Ferris, portraying a DOA victim, was draped in white sheet camouflage, and solemnly escorted to the hearse, courtesy of the John Day Funeral Home.

rbr_projectprom

            But that hour of activity represented just one point in time, the horrific result of a bad decision, which one prolific speaker would soon describe as occurring “in the blink of an eye.”  The assembly that followed told the story of what preceded that awful moment and the aftermath of lives inexorably changed.

            Joye Jones of Williamstown was described by RBR Student Assistance counselor Lori Todd, as the sweetest lady you would ever meet. The grandmother of seven and mother of three brought along her power point presentation and proceeded to speak with pride of her typical American family, their hopes and their dreams. She touched on her two sons’ families, professions and success. She spent the majority of time, however, talking about her second son, Steven. His dreams would never be realized since his life was taken decades ago at the age of 19. In vivid, exacting detail, aided by slides of a mangled car and accident scene, she described the harrowing last minutes of her son and another teenager’s lives.

The students could visualize the sports car flying along a curved road at over 100 mph, striking a guard rail and careening into a spillway, landing upside down in the water.  

            “He wasn’t killed by a monster,” she explained, “but by his best friend.”

Her narrative took them from an ominous three am policeman’s appearance at their home to the hospital room where she identified her son’s body. She was sincerely convinced, until that moment, that they had the wrong Steven Jones, because, as she told the students, “Stuff like this doesn’t happen to people like us.”

            She added, “But I am here to tell you, it does.”

Many students dappled their tearing eyes as her pain was palatable to all, a pain that all these years later, they realized, never, ever goes away.

            What followed was just as poignant. A young man, only a few years older than the students’ he addressed, came to speak at the school assembly accompanied by another heartbroken mother, his own.

            Eric Pereira of Jackson told the students that he had sat in their seats just four years ago. He was a Stars Scholar and was attending Rutgers University. But instead of graduating college, in a few short weeks, he would begin a seven year prison sentence for second degree vehicular manslaughter. While driving drunk in 2011, Eric killed the father of five and injured three other people.

            It was Eric Pereira’s choice to speak to the students according to his defense attorney, Mitch Ansell, who also addressed the seniors on the legal consequences of underage drinking and driving.

            Eric told the students, “It isn’t anything we think about or plan on happening. It just happens. It’s a horrible nightmare. There is no waking up. It is reality.” He added, “There is now a wife without a husband, five kids without a father. So many things this man worked hard for; things he wanted to do with the remainder of his long life, he can’t do because of me. I took it all away from him, just because I made a decision to drive drunk.”

            The message continued all week at RBR with other emergency personnel from the three sending towns of Red Bank, Little Silver and Shrewsbury visiting the student’s health classes to reinforce the messages given that day. Toward the end of the week, and on the day of the prom, Officer Gibson conducted a drunken driving exercise where students don fatal vision goggles” which simulates intoxication as they try to navigate an obstacle course on a golf cart. They learned they could not.

            All speakers, including Officer Gibson, explained that they wanted the students to have a wonderful prom, and to enjoy this fun, carefree time of their lives. However, the speakers heeded, and even begged that whatever they did, they should separate drinking from driving. 

Students Witness Mock Crash, and Meet Real Victims of Drunk Driving in Project Prom Program

Little Silver, NJ –  For the eighth year, Red Bank Regional (RBR) conducted Project Prom to promote their students’ safety during prom weekend.  That is the time when national statistics soar for vehicular accidents involving young people and alcohol. The program, organized by RBR’s resource officer Pete Gibson, began with a graphic mock crash and rescue on the high school campus. Seniors were led to their school’s front parking lot to watch a reenactment of a drunk-driving accident.

            This year, for the first time, students played roles in the mock crash. Jake Cullinane of Tinton Falls portrayed the drunk driver who was led away in handcuffs by the police from a devastating three-car crash. Two other students, Terrence Scanlon, Lincroft, and Anthony Vogel, Middletown, were cut out of the crashed cars with the Jaws of Life operated by Little Silver and Shrewsbury first responders.  Michael’s mother, RBR Administrative Assistance Donna Carotenuto, was spirited into an ambulance after being stabilized in a neck brace. RBR teacher Scott Ferris, portraying a DOA victim, was draped in white sheet camouflage, and solemnly escorted to the hearse, courtesy of the John Day Funeral Home.

rbr_projectprom

            But that hour of activity represented just one point in time, the horrific result of a bad decision, which one prolific speaker would soon describe as occurring “in the blink of an eye.”  The assembly that followed told the story of what preceded that awful moment and the aftermath of lives inexorably changed.

            Joye Jones of Williamstown was described by RBR Student Assistance counselor Lori Todd, as the sweetest lady you would ever meet. The grandmother of seven and mother of three brought along her power point presentation and proceeded to speak with pride of her typical American family, their hopes and their dreams. She touched on her two sons’ families, professions and success. She spent the majority of time, however, talking about her second son, Steven. His dreams would never be realized since his life was taken decades ago at the age of 19. In vivid, exacting detail, aided by slides of a mangled car and accident scene, she described the harrowing last minutes of her son and another teenager’s lives.

The students could visualize the sports car flying along a curved road at over 100 mph, striking a guard rail and careening into a spillway, landing upside down in the water.  

            “He wasn’t killed by a monster,” she explained, “but by his best friend.”

Her narrative took them from an ominous three am policeman’s appearance at their home to the hospital room where she identified her son’s body. She was sincerely convinced, until that moment, that they had the wrong Steven Jones, because, as she told the students, “Stuff like this doesn’t happen to people like us.”

            She added, “But I am here to tell you, it does.”

Many students dappled their tearing eyes as her pain was palatable to all, a pain that all these years later, they realized, never, ever goes away.

            What followed was just as poignant. A young man, only a few years older than the students’ he addressed, came to speak at the school assembly accompanied by another heartbroken mother, his own.

            Eric Pereira of Jackson told the students that he had sat in their seats just four years ago. He was a Stars Scholar and was attending Rutgers University. But instead of graduating college, in a few short weeks, he would begin a seven year prison sentence for second degree vehicular manslaughter. While driving drunk in 2011, Eric killed the father of five and injured three other people.

            It was Eric Pereira’s choice to speak to the students according to his defense attorney, Mitch Ansell, who also addressed the seniors on the legal consequences of underage drinking and driving.

            Eric told the students, “It isn’t anything we think about or plan on happening. It just happens. It’s a horrible nightmare. There is no waking up. It is reality.” He added, “There is now a wife without a husband, five kids without a father. So many things this man worked hard for; things he wanted to do with the remainder of his long life, he can’t do because of me. I took it all away from him, just because I made a decision to drive drunk.”

            The message continued all week at RBR with other emergency personnel from the three sending towns of Red Bank, Little Silver and Shrewsbury visiting the student’s health classes to reinforce the messages given that day. Toward the end of the week, and on the day of the prom, Officer Gibson conducted a drunken driving exercise where students don fatal vision goggles” which simulates intoxication as they try to navigate an obstacle course on a golf cart. They learned they could not.

            All speakers, including Officer Gibson, explained that they wanted the students to have a wonderful prom, and to enjoy this fun, carefree time of their lives. However, the speakers heeded, and even begged that whatever they did, they should separate drinking from driving. 

June Heats Up with Summer Activities for All

FREEHOLD, NJ – It’s not just the beautiful beaches that make Monmouth County a summer hot spot, it’s the abundance of activities and entertainment. From world-class shopping and dining to concerts, festivals, theater, car shows, history and art shows, Monmouth County offers something for everyone.

Festivals and outdoor events fill the June calendar from beginning to end. The best way to keep up with all of the tourism activities is by “liking” Monmouth County Tourism on Facebook and receiving daily Twitter updates.

Or, you can visit the county tourism’s Calendar of Events for the most comprehensive list of summer entertainment. Find it by clicking on the Tourism icon at www.visitmonmouth.com. The calendar is updated nearly every day, so it’s the best source for current information. You may call 800-523-2587 and ask to have a packet of information mailed to you, or stop by 1 E. Main St., Freehold, to browse the extensive literature between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. weekdays.

There’s no need to travel far for summer fun with the June schedule. It all starts Friday, June 1, with Red Bank’s Riverfest in Marine Park, featuring great food and live music all weekend.  Closer to the beach, the Ocean Grove Giant Flea market is June 2 on Ocean Pathway. The historic town’s famous Great Auditorium will also feature the B-Street Band on June 23 and ShaNaNa on June 30. 

The Jersey Shore Partnership is celebrating its start of the summer party on June 4 at Fort Hancock, Sandy Hook.  An exceptional evening is planned with specialty food, great music and a gorgeous view.

The following weekend, get your appetite ready for Belmar’s 26th Annual Seafood Festival June 8, 9 and 10.  Come out to Silver Lake Park to enjoy samplings of some of the finest seafood the state has to offer. Be sure to stop by the Monmouth County table and pick up county information and sign up to receive the county’s newsletter by email.

The Irish Festival, at Monmouth Park Racetrack in Oceanport on June 10, is always a fun event with live music, food and heritage. Maybe the luck of the Irish will even help you win a race! 

First Saturday Night in Asbury Park is June 2, where you can enjoy sidewalk sales and great dining.  The Red Bank Food & Wine Walk is in restaurants throughout town on June 10 and 24.

There is no shortage of events for car lovers.  June 9 is the Ocean Grove Vintage Car Show on Main Avenue and the Atlantic Highlands Classic Car Show on First Avenue.

On June 17, Long Branch presents its 18th annual Cruise to the Jersey Shore, where customs, hotrods, classics and collectibles all gather on the Oceanfront Promenade. If cars do not excite you, the Cruise is still a fun event to attend with live music, food and vendors.

Also in Long Branch is Thursdays by the Sea on June 14, 21 and 28 in Festival Plaza, as well as Blues on the Beach on June 10 in West End Park, where local acts get a chance to shine.

There is Art in the Park at Divine Park in Spring Lake on June 16; the Pro Am Skim Bash on the Sea Bright oceanfront on June 23 and 24; flea larkets in Allaire Village and Dorbrook Recreation Area on June 23 and concerts in the park in Belmar and Bradley beach every weekend throughout the summer.

The Wall Township Fair is at the Wall Municipal Complex, running from June 28 through July 1.  Enjoy traditional fair favorites such as food, rides, crafts and games, as well as some not-so-traditional ones such as a skydiving show, softball and Wiffle Ball tournaments and a helicopter landing.  The Asbury Park Jazz Festival comes to Bradley Park on June 30, attracting jazz enthusiasts near and far.

Looking to take a break from the summer heat? No problem. The list of indoor theater and concerts is extensive.  For example, visit the Center Playhouse in Freehold to see the heartwarming play, “Tuesdays With Morrie,” running from June 1 to 17.  The Two River Theatre in Red Bank has “My Wonderful Day” on June 2 and 3, and the Axelrod Performing Arts Center in Deal will present “42nd Street” on June 27 and 28. The famous Count Basie Theatre in Red Bank has a musical act for all ages and genres, including smash hit artists such as Steve Miller Band, Hot Tuna and Crosby Stills & Nash.

For a taste of history, stop by the Spring Lake Historic House tour on June 7, celebrate King George III’s Birthday on June 2 at Marlpit Hall or relive Maria Allaire’s wedding followed by a garden party on June 10 at Historic Allaire Village in Wall. 

This is just a sample of what summer 2012 in Monmouth County has to offer. To find out what else is happening this summer, simply click on the Calendar of Events at www.visitmonmouth.com.

June Heats Up with Summer Activities for All

FREEHOLD, NJ – It’s not just the beautiful beaches that make Monmouth County a summer hot spot, it’s the abundance of activities and entertainment. From world-class shopping and dining to concerts, festivals, theater, car shows, history and art shows, Monmouth County offers something for everyone.

Festivals and outdoor events fill the June calendar from beginning to end. The best way to keep up with all of the tourism activities is by “liking” Monmouth County Tourism on Facebook and receiving daily Twitter updates.

Or, you can visit the county tourism’s Calendar of Events for the most comprehensive list of summer entertainment. Find it by clicking on the Tourism icon at www.visitmonmouth.com. The calendar is updated nearly every day, so it’s the best source for current information. You may call 800-523-2587 and ask to have a packet of information mailed to you, or stop by 1 E. Main St., Freehold, to browse the extensive literature between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. weekdays.

There’s no need to travel far for summer fun with the June schedule. It all starts Friday, June 1, with Red Bank’s Riverfest in Marine Park, featuring great food and live music all weekend.  Closer to the beach, the Ocean Grove Giant Flea market is June 2 on Ocean Pathway. The historic town’s famous Great Auditorium will also feature the B-Street Band on June 23 and ShaNaNa on June 30. 

The Jersey Shore Partnership is celebrating its start of the summer party on June 4 at Fort Hancock, Sandy Hook.  An exceptional evening is planned with specialty food, great music and a gorgeous view.

The following weekend, get your appetite ready for Belmar’s 26th Annual Seafood Festival June 8, 9 and 10.  Come out to Silver Lake Park to enjoy samplings of some of the finest seafood the state has to offer. Be sure to stop by the Monmouth County table and pick up county information and sign up to receive the county’s newsletter by email.

The Irish Festival, at Monmouth Park Racetrack in Oceanport on June 10, is always a fun event with live music, food and heritage. Maybe the luck of the Irish will even help you win a race! 

First Saturday Night in Asbury Park is June 2, where you can enjoy sidewalk sales and great dining.  The Red Bank Food & Wine Walk is in restaurants throughout town on June 10 and 24.

There is no shortage of events for car lovers.  June 9 is the Ocean Grove Vintage Car Show on Main Avenue and the Atlantic Highlands Classic Car Show on First Avenue.

On June 17, Long Branch presents its 18th annual Cruise to the Jersey Shore, where customs, hotrods, classics and collectibles all gather on the Oceanfront Promenade. If cars do not excite you, the Cruise is still a fun event to attend with live music, food and vendors.

Also in Long Branch is Thursdays by the Sea on June 14, 21 and 28 in Festival Plaza, as well as Blues on the Beach on June 10 in West End Park, where local acts get a chance to shine.

There is Art in the Park at Divine Park in Spring Lake on June 16; the Pro Am Skim Bash on the Sea Bright oceanfront on June 23 and 24; flea larkets in Allaire Village and Dorbrook Recreation Area on June 23 and concerts in the park in Belmar and Bradley beach every weekend throughout the summer.

The Wall Township Fair is at the Wall Municipal Complex, running from June 28 through July 1.  Enjoy traditional fair favorites such as food, rides, crafts and games, as well as some not-so-traditional ones such as a skydiving show, softball and Wiffle Ball tournaments and a helicopter landing.  The Asbury Park Jazz Festival comes to Bradley Park on June 30, attracting jazz enthusiasts near and far.

Looking to take a break from the summer heat? No problem. The list of indoor theater and concerts is extensive.  For example, visit the Center Playhouse in Freehold to see the heartwarming play, “Tuesdays With Morrie,” running from June 1 to 17.  The Two River Theatre in Red Bank has “My Wonderful Day” on June 2 and 3, and the Axelrod Performing Arts Center in Deal will present “42nd Street” on June 27 and 28. The famous Count Basie Theatre in Red Bank has a musical act for all ages and genres, including smash hit artists such as Steve Miller Band, Hot Tuna and Crosby Stills & Nash.

For a taste of history, stop by the Spring Lake Historic House tour on June 7, celebrate King George III’s Birthday on June 2 at Marlpit Hall or relive Maria Allaire’s wedding followed by a garden party on June 10 at Historic Allaire Village in Wall. 

This is just a sample of what summer 2012 in Monmouth County has to offer. To find out what else is happening this summer, simply click on the Calendar of Events at www.visitmonmouth.com.