RBR Summer Programs Give Students A Leg Up for September

Little Silver, NJ – It might be the dog days of summer, but learning continues within the Red Bank Regional High School (RBR) building during July and August. The school district operates numerous programs to give its students a leg up for September. These include Summer Slam, a freshman transition program, pre – AP (Advanced Placement) workshops for students in the AVID (Advancement via Individual Determination) program, enrichment programs for ELL (English Language Learners) and special education students and workshops for AP and International Baccalaureate students.  The aforementioned programs are funded by federal grant money. (The school is one of very few that also operates a traditional summer school and is also open to students outside of RBR on a tuition-basis.)

rbr_summer_programs_2
As part of RBR’s summer enrichment programming, students took a trip to the Liberty Science Center

            RBR also offers a five-week visual and performing arts camp for grades 5 through nine (on a tuition basis), which culminates in a popular musical performance. This year The Little Mermaid, Jr. will be presented on August 9.  Sport camps and team practice continually utilize the school building and campus during July and August.

rbr_summer_programs_1

RBR science teacher David Hussey instructs his Pre-IB science students on the basics of gardening during RBR’s summer programming. Pre-IB courses in science and writing were added to the programming this year to better support those students aspiring to these challenging, high-level courses.

            New to the programming this year is preparatory classes for students aspiring to the challenging International Baccalaureate (IB) courses.

            RBR Principal Risa Clay explains, “With open access to the Advanced Placement and IB programs we needed to make sure we have the proper support for kids. For several years, we have offered a pre-AP program in math and English over the summer, which has prepared some of our students for that high-level course work. Our IB teachers asked us to offer similar support for the IB program. We responded by adding pre-IB classes in writing and science.”

            While IB English teacher Katie Blackwell works with her students in the media center with on-line programs to improve their writing skills, science teacher David Hussey guides his students outside working the earth to create a fall vegetable garden.  When in the classroom, they measure their hydroponic plants, and test the nutrients in the hydroponic and outside soils. Simultaneous to their sowing seeds in the ground they are also germinating the skills to write research papers, a key element of the International Baccalaureate courses. An added benefit, this fall, the school’s culinary students will be able to harvest the fruit of their labors for special autumn dishes.

            Summer Slam represents RBR’s largest summer program with student representation from all three sending school towns of Red Bank, Shrewsbury and Little Silver as well as other towns that send students to RBR’s signature four-year academies.

            “The program grows with popularity each year,” states SOURCE Coordinator Suzanne Keller, adding, “For the first time we were over-subscribed with 110 students.”

            The SOURCE, RBR’s School-based Youth Services Program, operates Summer Slam to better prepare incoming freshman for high school. The students receive enrichment in language arts, math, history and science. They also took a class trip to Liberty Science Center.

            This year, a special day was added to the summer enrichment program, a departure from routine of the academic program so the students could make the connection of the body and spirit to the mind. RBR English teacher Erika Robinson was able to bring professionals from various fields to give a unique perspective on physical and mental well being.

rbr_summer_programs_4

Motivational speaker Hans Hageman

            Motivational speaker Hans Hageman, talked to the students on proper nutrition and exercise as a way of empowering their body and mind, while his wife, the owner/operator of a NYC fitness club, took the students through challenging organic movement exercises. The students were also introduced to the benefits of yoga by Mary Reilly Nichols, a renowned yoga instructor in Manhattan. RBR teacher Justin Biggs shared mindfulness techniques to help students function in the moment to relieve anxieties. Spiritualist Wendy Rapp also helped students become better acquainted with their spiritual nature. Rounding out the body and mind experiential day, brother and sister karate instructors Alexis and Doug Keller, from the Art Beins Karate School in Freehold, gave students some basic lessons in karate and self defense. 

rbr_summer_programs_3
This year a special day was added to the summer enrichment schedule, a departure from routine of the academic program so the students may make the connection of the body and spirit to mind.

            Erika Robinson comments, “These presentations are about personal improvement. At this age, the students have not yet learned to control their emotions. These presentations will help give them tools to do that. I hope they will become aware of what they don’t know– that they have the courage, strength, compassion, potential and ability to focus to become truly educated people in the world.”

RBR Summer Programs Give Students A Leg Up for September

Little Silver, NJ – It might be the dog days of summer, but learning continues within the Red Bank Regional High School (RBR) building during July and August. The school district operates numerous programs to give its students a leg up for September. These include Summer Slam, a freshman transition program, pre – AP (Advanced Placement) workshops for students in the AVID (Advancement via Individual Determination) program, enrichment programs for ELL (English Language Learners) and special education students and workshops for AP and International Baccalaureate students.  The aforementioned programs are funded by federal grant money. (The school is one of very few that also operates a traditional summer school and is also open to students outside of RBR on a tuition-basis.)

rbr_summer_programs_2
As part of RBR’s summer enrichment programming, students took a trip to the Liberty Science Center

            RBR also offers a five-week visual and performing arts camp for grades 5 through nine (on a tuition basis), which culminates in a popular musical performance. This year The Little Mermaid, Jr. will be presented on August 9.  Sport camps and team practice continually utilize the school building and campus during July and August.

rbr_summer_programs_1

RBR science teacher David Hussey instructs his Pre-IB science students on the basics of gardening during RBR’s summer programming. Pre-IB courses in science and writing were added to the programming this year to better support those students aspiring to these challenging, high-level courses.

            New to the programming this year is preparatory classes for students aspiring to the challenging International Baccalaureate (IB) courses.

            RBR Principal Risa Clay explains, “With open access to the Advanced Placement and IB programs we needed to make sure we have the proper support for kids. For several years, we have offered a pre-AP program in math and English over the summer, which has prepared some of our students for that high-level course work. Our IB teachers asked us to offer similar support for the IB program. We responded by adding pre-IB classes in writing and science.”

            While IB English teacher Katie Blackwell works with her students in the media center with on-line programs to improve their writing skills, science teacher David Hussey guides his students outside working the earth to create a fall vegetable garden.  When in the classroom, they measure their hydroponic plants, and test the nutrients in the hydroponic and outside soils. Simultaneous to their sowing seeds in the ground they are also germinating the skills to write research papers, a key element of the International Baccalaureate courses. An added benefit, this fall, the school’s culinary students will be able to harvest the fruit of their labors for special autumn dishes.

            Summer Slam represents RBR’s largest summer program with student representation from all three sending school towns of Red Bank, Shrewsbury and Little Silver as well as other towns that send students to RBR’s signature four-year academies.

            “The program grows with popularity each year,” states SOURCE Coordinator Suzanne Keller, adding, “For the first time we were over-subscribed with 110 students.”

            The SOURCE, RBR’s School-based Youth Services Program, operates Summer Slam to better prepare incoming freshman for high school. The students receive enrichment in language arts, math, history and science. They also took a class trip to Liberty Science Center.

            This year, a special day was added to the summer enrichment program, a departure from routine of the academic program so the students could make the connection of the body and spirit to the mind. RBR English teacher Erika Robinson was able to bring professionals from various fields to give a unique perspective on physical and mental well being.

rbr_summer_programs_4

Motivational speaker Hans Hageman

            Motivational speaker Hans Hageman, talked to the students on proper nutrition and exercise as a way of empowering their body and mind, while his wife, the owner/operator of a NYC fitness club, took the students through challenging organic movement exercises. The students were also introduced to the benefits of yoga by Mary Reilly Nichols, a renowned yoga instructor in Manhattan. RBR teacher Justin Biggs shared mindfulness techniques to help students function in the moment to relieve anxieties. Spiritualist Wendy Rapp also helped students become better acquainted with their spiritual nature. Rounding out the body and mind experiential day, brother and sister karate instructors Alexis and Doug Keller, from the Art Beins Karate School in Freehold, gave students some basic lessons in karate and self defense. 

rbr_summer_programs_3
This year a special day was added to the summer enrichment schedule, a departure from routine of the academic program so the students may make the connection of the body and spirit to mind.

            Erika Robinson comments, “These presentations are about personal improvement. At this age, the students have not yet learned to control their emotions. These presentations will help give them tools to do that. I hope they will become aware of what they don’t know– that they have the courage, strength, compassion, potential and ability to focus to become truly educated people in the world.”

Investigate Before You Donate – “Top 10 Most Inquired-About Charities”

NEWARK, NJ – An array of organizations claiming to help American veterans, all with very similar and inspiring names – Disabled American Veterans; Disabled Veterans National Foundation; Disabled Veterans Services; Paralyzed Veterans of America; Veterans Support Foundation; and Wounded Warrior Project – dominate the list of New Jersey’s “Top 10 Most Inquired-About Charities” for the first half of 2012.

Though they have nearly identical names and mission statements, the groups are not equal when it comes to the way they spend donations made by consumers.

When Veterans Support Foundation, of Silver Spring, MD, spent money during its most recent reported fiscal year, the group dedicated just 25 cents of each dollar toward its stated mission to improve the lives of America’s Vietnam-era veterans.  The organization spent 44 cents of each dollar on fundraising, and 31 cents on management and general costs.

By contrast, Disabled American Veterans, of Cold Spring, KY, dedicated 69 cents of each dollar toward its stated mission to help veterans and their families obtain benefits and services.  The organization spent 26 cents of each dollar on fundraising, and 5 cents on management and general costs.

Spending by the other veterans groups fell in between those two extremes.

“When deciding where to donate their money, consumers should look beyond a charity’s positive-sounding name and mission statement,” Attorney General Jeffrey S. Chiesa said.  “In many cases, only a very small percentage of your money will actually go toward the causes that inspire you, and the rest will go toward fundraisers and salaries.  It is always important to Investigate Before You Donate.”

The biannual list of New Jersey’s Top 10 Most Inquired-About Charities is drawn from consumer calls to the Division of Consumer Affairs’ Charities Registration Hotline, 973-504-6215. Today’s list provides information on the 10 charities most often asked about by consumers who called the Hotline from January through June 2012. A large number of inquiries may mean a charity solicited donations or held a campaign drive during the months in question.

“From our free ‘New Jersey Charity Search’ smartphone app to our analysis of the charities that most often solicit New Jerseyans, we are giving consumers the resources they need to make smart decisions about donating to charity,” Eric T. Kanefsky, Acting Director of the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs, said.  “When donating, as when making any purchase, consumers should learn as much as possible about the value they’re getting for their dollar.”

The Division launched the free, “New Jersey Charity Search” smartphone app in May. (Press release: http://www.njconsumeraffairs.gov/press/5292012.htm).

The Better Business Bureau’s Standards for Charity Accountability state that a charity should dedicate at least 65 percent of its expenses toward program activities, and no more than 35 percent toward fundraising. Consumers can compare that guideline with the expenditure reports that State-registered charities must provide annually to the Division of Consumer Affairs.

Each of the Top 10 Most-Inquired-About Charities is listed below, beginning with those that dedicated the smallest percentage of their expenditures to charitable programs, according to their most recent fiscal year reports. Click on each charity’s name to see the full pie chart and additional information.

Veterans Support Foundation, of Silver Spring, MD

Total expenses for the fiscal year ending 9/30/11:  $2,657,858

Charitable program expenses:  24.6 percent

Fundraising expenses:  44.2 percent

Management and general expenses:  31.2 percent


Cancer Support Services, of Dearborn, MI

Total expenses for the fiscal year ending 12/31/10:  $10,996,256

Charitable program expenses:  43.5 percent

Fundraising expenses:  51.7 percent

Management and general expenses:  4.8 percent

 

Disabled Veterans Services, of Pompano Beach, FL

Total expenses for the fiscal year ending 12/31/10:  $4,552,968

Charitable program expenses:  47.5 percent

Fundraising expenses:  49.6 percent

Management and general expenses:  2.8 percent

 

Disabled Veterans National Foundation, of Washington, DC

Total expenses for the fiscal year ending 12/31/10:  $30,557,458

Charitable program expenses:  56.8 percent

Fundraising expenses:  35.3 percent

Management and general expenses:  7.9 percent

 

Paralyzed Veterans of America, of Washington, DC

Total expenses for the fiscal year ending 9/30/11:  $114,656,518

Charitable program expenses:  61.7 percent

Fundraising expenses:  31.4 percent

Management and general expenses:  6.9 percent

 

National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare, of Washington, DC

Total expenses for the fiscal year ending 3/31/11:  $26,500,070

Charitable program expenses:  63.8 percent

Fundraising expenses:  5.8 percent

Management and general expenses:  30.4 percent

 

Wounded Warrior Project, of Jacksonville, FL

Total expenses for the fiscal year ending 9/30/10:  $34,843,801

Charitable program expenses:  64.1 percent

Fundraising expenses:  28.3 percent

Management and general expenses:  7.7 percent

 

Disabled American Veterans, of Cold Spring, KY

Total expenses for the fiscal year ending 12/31/10:  $125,556,794

Charitable program expenses:  69.2 percent

Fundraising expenses:  25.9 percent

Management and general expenses:  4.9 percent

 

United Service Organizations, of Arlington, VA

Total expenses for the fiscal year ending 12/31/11:  $115,763,245

Charitable program expenses:   70.6 percent

Fundraising expenses:  17.9 percent

Management and general expenses:  11.5 percent

 

Humane Society of the United States, of Washington, DC

Total expenses for the fiscal year ending 12/31/10:  $127,994,681

Charitable program expenses:  76.1 percent

Fundraising expenses:  20.2 percent

Management and general expenses:  3.7 percent

 

As part of its ongoing Investigate Before You Donate campaign, the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs encourages New Jersey consumers to learn about charities before making a donation. For example:

  • Find out whether the charity is registered in New Jersey, or is exempt from having to register. (Certain religious and educational organizations, and charities whose annual income includes less than $10,000 in public contributions and fundraising, are exempt from having to register with the State.)
  • Find out how much the charity spent during recent fiscal years on program costs, management costs, and fundraising.
  • Learn about the charity’s stated mission.
  • Consumers may obtain information about a charity in several ways.  They can ask the charity itself (reputable charities encourage you to do so), or visit the charity’s website.

Consumers can also obtain this information from the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs.    Visit the Division’s Charities Registration page at  www.NJConsumerAffairs.gov;  call the Division’s Charities Hotline at 973-504-6215 during regular business hours; or use the Division’s free “New Jersey Charity Search” smartphone app, available for download at http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/new-jersey-charity-search/id503535534?ls=1&mt=8.  

Consumers who believe they have been cheated or scammed by a business, or suspect any other form of consumer abuse, can file a complaint with the State Division of Consumer Affairs by visiting its website or by calling 1-800-242-5846 (toll free within New Jersey ) or 973-504-6200.

Follow the Division of Consumer Affairs on Facebook, and check our online calendar of upcoming Consumer Outreach events.

Investigate Before You Donate – “Top 10 Most Inquired-About Charities”

NEWARK, NJ – An array of organizations claiming to help American veterans, all with very similar and inspiring names – Disabled American Veterans; Disabled Veterans National Foundation; Disabled Veterans Services; Paralyzed Veterans of America; Veterans Support Foundation; and Wounded Warrior Project – dominate the list of New Jersey’s “Top 10 Most Inquired-About Charities” for the first half of 2012.

Though they have nearly identical names and mission statements, the groups are not equal when it comes to the way they spend donations made by consumers.

When Veterans Support Foundation, of Silver Spring, MD, spent money during its most recent reported fiscal year, the group dedicated just 25 cents of each dollar toward its stated mission to improve the lives of America’s Vietnam-era veterans.  The organization spent 44 cents of each dollar on fundraising, and 31 cents on management and general costs.

By contrast, Disabled American Veterans, of Cold Spring, KY, dedicated 69 cents of each dollar toward its stated mission to help veterans and their families obtain benefits and services.  The organization spent 26 cents of each dollar on fundraising, and 5 cents on management and general costs.

Spending by the other veterans groups fell in between those two extremes.

“When deciding where to donate their money, consumers should look beyond a charity’s positive-sounding name and mission statement,” Attorney General Jeffrey S. Chiesa said.  “In many cases, only a very small percentage of your money will actually go toward the causes that inspire you, and the rest will go toward fundraisers and salaries.  It is always important to Investigate Before You Donate.”

The biannual list of New Jersey’s Top 10 Most Inquired-About Charities is drawn from consumer calls to the Division of Consumer Affairs’ Charities Registration Hotline, 973-504-6215. Today’s list provides information on the 10 charities most often asked about by consumers who called the Hotline from January through June 2012. A large number of inquiries may mean a charity solicited donations or held a campaign drive during the months in question.

“From our free ‘New Jersey Charity Search’ smartphone app to our analysis of the charities that most often solicit New Jerseyans, we are giving consumers the resources they need to make smart decisions about donating to charity,” Eric T. Kanefsky, Acting Director of the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs, said.  “When donating, as when making any purchase, consumers should learn as much as possible about the value they’re getting for their dollar.”

The Division launched the free, “New Jersey Charity Search” smartphone app in May. (Press release: http://www.njconsumeraffairs.gov/press/5292012.htm).

The Better Business Bureau’s Standards for Charity Accountability state that a charity should dedicate at least 65 percent of its expenses toward program activities, and no more than 35 percent toward fundraising. Consumers can compare that guideline with the expenditure reports that State-registered charities must provide annually to the Division of Consumer Affairs.

Each of the Top 10 Most-Inquired-About Charities is listed below, beginning with those that dedicated the smallest percentage of their expenditures to charitable programs, according to their most recent fiscal year reports. Click on each charity’s name to see the full pie chart and additional information.

Veterans Support Foundation, of Silver Spring, MD

Total expenses for the fiscal year ending 9/30/11:  $2,657,858

Charitable program expenses:  24.6 percent

Fundraising expenses:  44.2 percent

Management and general expenses:  31.2 percent


Cancer Support Services, of Dearborn, MI

Total expenses for the fiscal year ending 12/31/10:  $10,996,256

Charitable program expenses:  43.5 percent

Fundraising expenses:  51.7 percent

Management and general expenses:  4.8 percent

 

Disabled Veterans Services, of Pompano Beach, FL

Total expenses for the fiscal year ending 12/31/10:  $4,552,968

Charitable program expenses:  47.5 percent

Fundraising expenses:  49.6 percent

Management and general expenses:  2.8 percent

 

Disabled Veterans National Foundation, of Washington, DC

Total expenses for the fiscal year ending 12/31/10:  $30,557,458

Charitable program expenses:  56.8 percent

Fundraising expenses:  35.3 percent

Management and general expenses:  7.9 percent

 

Paralyzed Veterans of America, of Washington, DC

Total expenses for the fiscal year ending 9/30/11:  $114,656,518

Charitable program expenses:  61.7 percent

Fundraising expenses:  31.4 percent

Management and general expenses:  6.9 percent

 

National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare, of Washington, DC

Total expenses for the fiscal year ending 3/31/11:  $26,500,070

Charitable program expenses:  63.8 percent

Fundraising expenses:  5.8 percent

Management and general expenses:  30.4 percent

 

Wounded Warrior Project, of Jacksonville, FL

Total expenses for the fiscal year ending 9/30/10:  $34,843,801

Charitable program expenses:  64.1 percent

Fundraising expenses:  28.3 percent

Management and general expenses:  7.7 percent

 

Disabled American Veterans, of Cold Spring, KY

Total expenses for the fiscal year ending 12/31/10:  $125,556,794

Charitable program expenses:  69.2 percent

Fundraising expenses:  25.9 percent

Management and general expenses:  4.9 percent

 

United Service Organizations, of Arlington, VA

Total expenses for the fiscal year ending 12/31/11:  $115,763,245

Charitable program expenses:   70.6 percent

Fundraising expenses:  17.9 percent

Management and general expenses:  11.5 percent

 

Humane Society of the United States, of Washington, DC

Total expenses for the fiscal year ending 12/31/10:  $127,994,681

Charitable program expenses:  76.1 percent

Fundraising expenses:  20.2 percent

Management and general expenses:  3.7 percent

 

As part of its ongoing Investigate Before You Donate campaign, the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs encourages New Jersey consumers to learn about charities before making a donation. For example:

  • Find out whether the charity is registered in New Jersey, or is exempt from having to register. (Certain religious and educational organizations, and charities whose annual income includes less than $10,000 in public contributions and fundraising, are exempt from having to register with the State.)
  • Find out how much the charity spent during recent fiscal years on program costs, management costs, and fundraising.
  • Learn about the charity’s stated mission.
  • Consumers may obtain information about a charity in several ways.  They can ask the charity itself (reputable charities encourage you to do so), or visit the charity’s website.

Consumers can also obtain this information from the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs.    Visit the Division’s Charities Registration page at  www.NJConsumerAffairs.gov;  call the Division’s Charities Hotline at 973-504-6215 during regular business hours; or use the Division’s free “New Jersey Charity Search” smartphone app, available for download at http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/new-jersey-charity-search/id503535534?ls=1&mt=8.  

Consumers who believe they have been cheated or scammed by a business, or suspect any other form of consumer abuse, can file a complaint with the State Division of Consumer Affairs by visiting its website or by calling 1-800-242-5846 (toll free within New Jersey ) or 973-504-6200.

Follow the Division of Consumer Affairs on Facebook, and check our online calendar of upcoming Consumer Outreach events.

Semper Fi!

anne_mikolay_2012_120At times, I prefer to bury my head in the sand and pretend the world is a happy place where we all love one another, respect life, and stop and smell the roses. The Aurora, Colorado tragedy certainly proves the reality of life; our world is unfair, cruel, and downright insane. When a bug-eyed, orange-coiffed James Holmes, the Aurora shooter, sits in a courtroom while his victims struggle to recover or are laid to rest, despair and hopelessness loom large.

But when you least expect it, you’ll find a light that restores your faith in mankind. Such is the case of little Cody Green and Sergeant Mark Dolfini of the United States Marine Corps.

Cody Green loved the Marines and drew strength from the Corps. to face his ten year battle with leukemia. In Cody’s final days (he passed in April, 2012), the United States Marines rewarded Cody’s courage by giving him Marine navigator wings and making him an honorary United States Marine. Sergeant Mark Dolfini wanted to do something more.

Dolfini contacted Cody’s parents; when he heard the young boy was in his final hours, the Sergeant went to the hospital and took it upon himself to stand guard outside Cody’s door for as long as it took for the child to leave our world and join the next. Dolfini stood guard for eight hours. At Cody’s funeral, he approached the casket and saluted the young honorary Marine. Dolfini also saluted Cody’s grieving mother.

“Marines don’t do this sort of thing for acclaim,” said Sergeant Dolfini. “That’s not how we’re wired. It’s not why we join. We didn’t join the Marine Corps. to be rich. We didn’t join it for fame. You don’t do it for that reason. If we all did just something like that once a day or just something small just think of what an incredible legacy that would leave for Cody.”

honorary_marine

Though this story is apparently making the rounds on facebook, it is not feel-good internet fiction. Snopes.com and several news agencies have confirmed the event. The United States Marine Corp., and specifically one sensitive soldier, showed the world evil cannot win. Sometimes, amidst sorrowful, dark days, good people reach into their hearts and prove respect for life – and hope – still thrive.

Kudos to the United States Marine Corps. Semper Fi!

Semper Fi!

anne_mikolay_2012_120At times, I prefer to bury my head in the sand and pretend the world is a happy place where we all love one another, respect life, and stop and smell the roses. The Aurora, Colorado tragedy certainly proves the reality of life; our world is unfair, cruel, and downright insane. When a bug-eyed, orange-coiffed James Holmes, the Aurora shooter, sits in a courtroom while his victims struggle to recover or are laid to rest, despair and hopelessness loom large.

But when you least expect it, you’ll find a light that restores your faith in mankind. Such is the case of little Cody Green and Sergeant Mark Dolfini of the United States Marine Corps.

Cody Green loved the Marines and drew strength from the Corps. to face his ten year battle with leukemia. In Cody’s final days (he passed in April, 2012), the United States Marines rewarded Cody’s courage by giving him Marine navigator wings and making him an honorary United States Marine. Sergeant Mark Dolfini wanted to do something more.

Dolfini contacted Cody’s parents; when he heard the young boy was in his final hours, the Sergeant went to the hospital and took it upon himself to stand guard outside Cody’s door for as long as it took for the child to leave our world and join the next. Dolfini stood guard for eight hours. At Cody’s funeral, he approached the casket and saluted the young honorary Marine. Dolfini also saluted Cody’s grieving mother.

“Marines don’t do this sort of thing for acclaim,” said Sergeant Dolfini. “That’s not how we’re wired. It’s not why we join. We didn’t join the Marine Corps. to be rich. We didn’t join it for fame. You don’t do it for that reason. If we all did just something like that once a day or just something small just think of what an incredible legacy that would leave for Cody.”

honorary_marine

Though this story is apparently making the rounds on facebook, it is not feel-good internet fiction. Snopes.com and several news agencies have confirmed the event. The United States Marine Corp., and specifically one sensitive soldier, showed the world evil cannot win. Sometimes, amidst sorrowful, dark days, good people reach into their hearts and prove respect for life – and hope – still thrive.

Kudos to the United States Marine Corps. Semper Fi!

4th Annual Tour de Fair Haven Cycles into Town on August 12

Benefits the Fair Haven Centennial Celebration and Bike Safety Programs

Over $10,000 in Prize Money for Racers

FAIR HAVEN – Tour de Fair Haven, presented by The Foundation of Fair Haven, USA Cycling Federation (USCF) affiliate Cycles 54 and ForeFront, Inc., in partnership with the Borough of Fair Haven, is an exciting and competitive event for cycling enthusiasts. The date of the race is Sunday, Aug 12th, 2012.

tour_de_fair_haven_2011
Racers participating in the 2011 Tour de Fair Haven.  Photo credit: Amanda Lynn

Tour de Fair Haven is expected to draw 400+ cyclists. The event includes festive activities for kids of all ages and their families. Six races will follow the 3.1 enclosed course, which begins at the Fair Haven Fire Department on River Road in the center of town.

The first race begins at 7:00 a.m., a Kids Race at noon, followed by the Pro Men’s Race, the main event of the day. Get a free cowbell to cheer on the racers, while they last, donated by Coastal Decor.

New this year, prizes will be awarded for best house decorations along the race route and for best tailgate. Local residents are encouraged to throw a party on their lawn and tailgaters are welcome to congregate at the Youth Center on Third Street.

This year’s Tour de Fair Haven ranks among one of the East Coast’s best races in a downtown setting. Racers will compete for $10,000 in prize money, and the event is expected to draw some of the best cyclists in the region.

“What has become ‘New Jersey’s Shore Toughest Race’ for the riders has become one of the most entertaining sporting events for spectators,” says Fair Haven Councilwoman Susan Sorensen, who is also a member of the Foundation for Fair Haven.

“This event benefits the Fair Haven Centennial Celebration,” adds Sorensen, “which is hosting a year-long calendar of special events to mark the 100 year milestone of Fair Haven’s incorporation, and will also help fund bike safety programs for local residents.” Sponsors include Saker ShopRites, ForeFront, Inc and Circle BMW.

Registration deadline is August 9. For registration, directions and more information, visit www.tourdefairhaven.com

4th Annual Tour de Fair Haven Cycles into Town on August 12

Benefits the Fair Haven Centennial Celebration and Bike Safety Programs

Over $10,000 in Prize Money for Racers

FAIR HAVEN – Tour de Fair Haven, presented by The Foundation of Fair Haven, USA Cycling Federation (USCF) affiliate Cycles 54 and ForeFront, Inc., in partnership with the Borough of Fair Haven, is an exciting and competitive event for cycling enthusiasts. The date of the race is Sunday, Aug 12th, 2012.

tour_de_fair_haven_2011
Racers participating in the 2011 Tour de Fair Haven.  Photo credit: Amanda Lynn

Tour de Fair Haven is expected to draw 400+ cyclists. The event includes festive activities for kids of all ages and their families. Six races will follow the 3.1 enclosed course, which begins at the Fair Haven Fire Department on River Road in the center of town.

The first race begins at 7:00 a.m., a Kids Race at noon, followed by the Pro Men’s Race, the main event of the day. Get a free cowbell to cheer on the racers, while they last, donated by Coastal Decor.

New this year, prizes will be awarded for best house decorations along the race route and for best tailgate. Local residents are encouraged to throw a party on their lawn and tailgaters are welcome to congregate at the Youth Center on Third Street.

This year’s Tour de Fair Haven ranks among one of the East Coast’s best races in a downtown setting. Racers will compete for $10,000 in prize money, and the event is expected to draw some of the best cyclists in the region.

“What has become ‘New Jersey’s Shore Toughest Race’ for the riders has become one of the most entertaining sporting events for spectators,” says Fair Haven Councilwoman Susan Sorensen, who is also a member of the Foundation for Fair Haven.

“This event benefits the Fair Haven Centennial Celebration,” adds Sorensen, “which is hosting a year-long calendar of special events to mark the 100 year milestone of Fair Haven’s incorporation, and will also help fund bike safety programs for local residents.” Sponsors include Saker ShopRites, ForeFront, Inc and Circle BMW.

Registration deadline is August 9. For registration, directions and more information, visit www.tourdefairhaven.com

‘Fire ‘N Ice’ Fundraiser August 6th Will Benefit the Middletown Lions Club

Middletown, NJ – On Monday evening August 6th, New England Hot Dog Company and Rita’s Italian Ice, Middletown, are partnering for the ‘Fire ‘N Ice’ Fundraiser to benefit the civic, service, and charitable programs and initiatives of the Middletown Lions Club. Fifteen percent of all sales between the hours of 5-8 p.m. will be donated to the club upon presentation of the event flyer. Participants must present the flyer, which can be downloaded and printed from the Middletown Lions Club website, http://mlions.org/Lionsfundraiser.pdf, in order for the organization to receive credit. The public is welcome.

New England Hot Dog Company features over two dozen varieties of hot dogs along with homemade sides like relish, baked beans, and chili and is located at 1286 Route 35 South in Squire Plaza. The phone number is (732) 856-9160. Rita’s Italian Ice, also located in Squire Plaza at 1300 Route 35 South, is known for an extensive variety of refreshing cool treats like ices and custards. The phone number is (732) 671-8322.

All funds generated will be dedicated to charitable and service initiatives. More information on the fundraiser or on obtaining the event flyer is available by contacting Lion Lori Anne Oliwa by email at [email protected] or by phone at (732) 757-7443.

The Middletown Lions Club was chartered in 1946 under Lions International and is part of the largest charitable service organization in the world. The 70-member club meets on the second and fourth Tuesdays of the month and is engaged in charitable, civic and service initiatives within the local community including free vision screenings for elementary school students in local school districts including Middletown Township, Hazlet, Red Bank, and Matawan-Aberdeen; a free eyeglass, eye exam, and hearing aid program for those who qualify financially; a free luncheon program on the third Thursday of each month at The Kitchen at St. Marks Food Pantry, Keansburg; and a Women’s Council which plans and hosts fundraisers to support women, children, and families with special needs. The club also volunteers time and donates funds to both local and global charitable organizations and initiatives. Membership is by invitation. More information is available by viewing the club website at www.mlions.org or by contacting Lion Lori Anne Oliwa. 

‘Fire ‘N Ice’ Fundraiser August 6th Will Benefit the Middletown Lions Club

Middletown, NJ – On Monday evening August 6th, New England Hot Dog Company and Rita’s Italian Ice, Middletown, are partnering for the ‘Fire ‘N Ice’ Fundraiser to benefit the civic, service, and charitable programs and initiatives of the Middletown Lions Club. Fifteen percent of all sales between the hours of 5-8 p.m. will be donated to the club upon presentation of the event flyer. Participants must present the flyer, which can be downloaded and printed from the Middletown Lions Club website, http://mlions.org/Lionsfundraiser.pdf, in order for the organization to receive credit. The public is welcome.

New England Hot Dog Company features over two dozen varieties of hot dogs along with homemade sides like relish, baked beans, and chili and is located at 1286 Route 35 South in Squire Plaza. The phone number is (732) 856-9160. Rita’s Italian Ice, also located in Squire Plaza at 1300 Route 35 South, is known for an extensive variety of refreshing cool treats like ices and custards. The phone number is (732) 671-8322.

All funds generated will be dedicated to charitable and service initiatives. More information on the fundraiser or on obtaining the event flyer is available by contacting Lion Lori Anne Oliwa by email at [email protected] or by phone at (732) 757-7443.

The Middletown Lions Club was chartered in 1946 under Lions International and is part of the largest charitable service organization in the world. The 70-member club meets on the second and fourth Tuesdays of the month and is engaged in charitable, civic and service initiatives within the local community including free vision screenings for elementary school students in local school districts including Middletown Township, Hazlet, Red Bank, and Matawan-Aberdeen; a free eyeglass, eye exam, and hearing aid program for those who qualify financially; a free luncheon program on the third Thursday of each month at The Kitchen at St. Marks Food Pantry, Keansburg; and a Women’s Council which plans and hosts fundraisers to support women, children, and families with special needs. The club also volunteers time and donates funds to both local and global charitable organizations and initiatives. Membership is by invitation. More information is available by viewing the club website at www.mlions.org or by contacting Lion Lori Anne Oliwa.