Review: Temptation – Confessions of a Marriage Counselor

david_prown_120Producer/writer/director Tyler Perry’s drama films definitely are not generally written to be box office smashes. Now Mr. Perry is also well known for his “Madea” themed movies (where he also plays the lead character) which are quite funny but also send a message. These movies do well in the box office and cross over to most audiences.

“Temptation” is one of those drama films that Perry’s touches are all over it, he is just not in it. I always look forward to these films as I know they are not perfectly polished; feature unique casting & show tough themes.

This 2 hour movie flew by and you could pretty much tell what was coming. However, Mr. Perry does an excellent job of drawing out/teasing to the subsequent action which creates a much more believable realism of the action/decision by the character(s).

I have to talk about the casting for a minute. If one was to read that some of the major roles were filled by the controversial Kim Kardashian: singer Brandy, and former Miss.America Vanessa Williams (now singer/actor), you won’t exactly rush out to see the film. But they play very interesting and somewhat flawed characters and it really works.

No doubt Mr. Perry’s films speak primarily to his African-American community. However, the message within these stories can be found in all cultures. I enjoy the movie going experience of Mr. Perry’s films for another reason. Often the audience has a healthy number of African-American Audience members, particularly women. In the AA community, the women are the rock of the family. They have seen all, dealt with all and there eyes are wide open. In this community as well, the movie going experience involves lots of talking back to the movie screen. Could be distracting, but actually adds to the movie experience. I really appreciate their comments and emotions during the course of the film…helps bring me deeper into the movie.

Review: Temptation – Confessions of a Marriage Counselor

david_prown_120Producer/writer/director Tyler Perry’s drama films definitely are not generally written to be box office smashes. Now Mr. Perry is also well known for his “Madea” themed movies (where he also plays the lead character) which are quite funny but also send a message. These movies do well in the box office and cross over to most audiences.

“Temptation” is one of those drama films that Perry’s touches are all over it, he is just not in it. I always look forward to these films as I know they are not perfectly polished; feature unique casting & show tough themes.

This 2 hour movie flew by and you could pretty much tell what was coming. However, Mr. Perry does an excellent job of drawing out/teasing to the subsequent action which creates a much more believable realism of the action/decision by the character(s).

I have to talk about the casting for a minute. If one was to read that some of the major roles were filled by the controversial Kim Kardashian: singer Brandy, and former Miss.America Vanessa Williams (now singer/actor), you won’t exactly rush out to see the film. But they play very interesting and somewhat flawed characters and it really works.

No doubt Mr. Perry’s films speak primarily to his African-American community. However, the message within these stories can be found in all cultures. I enjoy the movie going experience of Mr. Perry’s films for another reason. Often the audience has a healthy number of African-American Audience members, particularly women. In the AA community, the women are the rock of the family. They have seen all, dealt with all and there eyes are wide open. In this community as well, the movie going experience involves lots of talking back to the movie screen. Could be distracting, but actually adds to the movie experience. I really appreciate their comments and emotions during the course of the film…helps bring me deeper into the movie.

Candidate Profile: Matthew Morehead, Candidate for 13th Legislative District, NJ State Assembly

mikolay_headshot_2011_120Like many New Jersey natives, Matthew Morehead has always taken great pride in his community, viewing its unique people and places as a source of inspiration. A lifelong resident of Monmouth County, his family tree is largely intertwined with local history, stretching from pre-Revolutionary times all the way to the modern era. It was this sense of kinship with his surroundings that propelled Morehead to become politically active; now, with the November elections just around the corner, the Middletown resident hopes to open a new chapter in Bayshore history by being elected to the State Legislature.

As one of the Democratic Party candidates for Assembly in the Thirteenth Legislative District, Morehead hopes to provide constituents with accessible and open-minded representation in Trenton. A long-time activist in political causes, he first considered running for office in 2009. Though he ultimately didn’t do so, the prospective candidate never lost this desire to serve New Jersey’s residents; a dream became reality when the Monmouth County Democrats nominated Morehead, who served as campaign manager for the party’s legislative tickets in the Thirteenth District in 2007 and 2009, and attorney Allison Friedman, at their convention earlier this month.

“I’ve always felt the need to do public service for my community at any level of government,” said Morehead, whose experiences as the owner of Sudzy Puppy dog grooming were among the many factors that prompted him to consider a run for office. “I am a small business owner, so I understand the dynamics of what is happening in this state. It is terrible for small business owners to get a foothold, to grow, or to hire anybody…we have out-regulated the ability to really get new businesses.”

matthew_morehead

Matthew Morehead, Candidate for 13th Legislative District, NJ State Assembly 

This hostile business environment, coupled with the fact New Jersey’s property taxes are among the highest in the nation, has negatively impacted residents from all walks of life. Though Garden State taxpayers share this unfortunate burden, Morehead believes the youth have been dealt and exceptionally unjust hand. Fiscal irresponsibility squashed their ability to experience financial stability or economic independence long before they even stood a chance.

“I would expect support from young people because I have a strong history of supporting youth issues,” said Morehead.  “It is next to impossible to get a start in this state because you have a whole generation forced to flee [from New Jersey] because of the taxes and the policies we have here. Youth unemployment is higher than it is for others and we’ve priced most young people out of the market!”

Morehead believes the increasing polarization of American politics and the broadening of the line that separates Democrats and Republicans has had an adverse impact on government accountability, shutting out those who would otherwise become involved in state affairs. In addition to the inaccessibility of elected officials, changing political norms have blurred the line between conservatism and liberalism, leaving a growing demographic completely unrepresented by politicians, who continue to use the partisan model.

“People associate parties with whether you are liberal or conservative,” said Morehead. “But most people in my generation are socially liberal and fall more towards being financially conservative. They went from supporting Obama to supporting Ron Paul, which are polar opposites, and were able to do this based upon the fact that the younger generation already knows that it is being left out of the conversation. Right now, the government is basically saying we need to sell out our future so we can preserve what we have today, instead of biting bullet and making hard decisions.”

Morehead, who supports shared services and believes “we have reached the limit on what we can tax individuals in this state,” plans to discard such ideological isolation if elected to office.

“My door would always be open to anyone, no matter what their party or ideas,” he said, stressing that he appreciates that many individuals, particularly students, who have traditionally been inactive politically, have now started to show an interest in their government. “It’s nice to see that the younger generations are finally aware of what they have at stake because apathy is what got us into this problem.”

Candidate Profile: Matthew Morehead, Candidate for 13th Legislative District, NJ State Assembly

mikolay_headshot_2011_120Like many New Jersey natives, Matthew Morehead has always taken great pride in his community, viewing its unique people and places as a source of inspiration. A lifelong resident of Monmouth County, his family tree is largely intertwined with local history, stretching from pre-Revolutionary times all the way to the modern era. It was this sense of kinship with his surroundings that propelled Morehead to become politically active; now, with the November elections just around the corner, the Middletown resident hopes to open a new chapter in Bayshore history by being elected to the State Legislature.

As one of the Democratic Party candidates for Assembly in the Thirteenth Legislative District, Morehead hopes to provide constituents with accessible and open-minded representation in Trenton. A long-time activist in political causes, he first considered running for office in 2009. Though he ultimately didn’t do so, the prospective candidate never lost this desire to serve New Jersey’s residents; a dream became reality when the Monmouth County Democrats nominated Morehead, who served as campaign manager for the party’s legislative tickets in the Thirteenth District in 2007 and 2009, and attorney Allison Friedman, at their convention earlier this month.

“I’ve always felt the need to do public service for my community at any level of government,” said Morehead, whose experiences as the owner of Sudzy Puppy dog grooming were among the many factors that prompted him to consider a run for office. “I am a small business owner, so I understand the dynamics of what is happening in this state. It is terrible for small business owners to get a foothold, to grow, or to hire anybody…we have out-regulated the ability to really get new businesses.”

matthew_morehead

Matthew Morehead, Candidate for 13th Legislative District, NJ State Assembly 

This hostile business environment, coupled with the fact New Jersey’s property taxes are among the highest in the nation, has negatively impacted residents from all walks of life. Though Garden State taxpayers share this unfortunate burden, Morehead believes the youth have been dealt and exceptionally unjust hand. Fiscal irresponsibility squashed their ability to experience financial stability or economic independence long before they even stood a chance.

“I would expect support from young people because I have a strong history of supporting youth issues,” said Morehead.  “It is next to impossible to get a start in this state because you have a whole generation forced to flee [from New Jersey] because of the taxes and the policies we have here. Youth unemployment is higher than it is for others and we’ve priced most young people out of the market!”

Morehead believes the increasing polarization of American politics and the broadening of the line that separates Democrats and Republicans has had an adverse impact on government accountability, shutting out those who would otherwise become involved in state affairs. In addition to the inaccessibility of elected officials, changing political norms have blurred the line between conservatism and liberalism, leaving a growing demographic completely unrepresented by politicians, who continue to use the partisan model.

“People associate parties with whether you are liberal or conservative,” said Morehead. “But most people in my generation are socially liberal and fall more towards being financially conservative. They went from supporting Obama to supporting Ron Paul, which are polar opposites, and were able to do this based upon the fact that the younger generation already knows that it is being left out of the conversation. Right now, the government is basically saying we need to sell out our future so we can preserve what we have today, instead of biting bullet and making hard decisions.”

Morehead, who supports shared services and believes “we have reached the limit on what we can tax individuals in this state,” plans to discard such ideological isolation if elected to office.

“My door would always be open to anyone, no matter what their party or ideas,” he said, stressing that he appreciates that many individuals, particularly students, who have traditionally been inactive politically, have now started to show an interest in their government. “It’s nice to see that the younger generations are finally aware of what they have at stake because apathy is what got us into this problem.”

Freeholders Mark ‘American Red Cross Month’

FREEHOLD, NJ – To help raise awareness about the good work by the American Red Cross and the organization’s need for continued support, the Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders issued a proclamation recognizing March as American Red Cross Month.

The proclamation was presented during the March 28 freeholder meeting to Tim Settles, Regional Director of Disaster Services, and Chris Dempsey, Disaster Readiness & Response Specialist.

“Your team is out there helping people whenever there is a disaster, tragedy or major storm, and we thank you for your work and commitment,” Freeholder Director Thomas A. Arnone said. “Volunteerism is the foundation of this county and this great country, and nowhere is that more apparent than with the American Red Cross.”

The American Red Cross was created in 1881 by Clara Barton and officially chartered by Congress in 1900 to provide national and international relief during disasters, and to give relief to the military and serve as a means of communication between members of the Armed Forces and their families.

In 1943, President Franklin D. Roosevelt proclaimed the first Red Cross Month in support of Red Cross fundraising efforts to respond to needs brought on by World War II. Since that time, every president, including President Obama, has designated March as Red Cross Month.

The Jersey Coast Chapter was founded in 1917 along with several other chapters but during World War II, all Monmouth County chapters were united into one and headquartered in Shrewsbury.

The American Red Cross, Jersey Coast Chapter is a humanitarian organization with hundreds of volunteers who provide relief to victims of disasters and help people prevent, prepare for and respond to emergencies.

The Jersey Coast Chapter of the American Red Cross has enhanced the quality of life for our citizens through Armed Forces support, blood collections, and providing lifesaving courses in first aid, CPR, water safety, lifeguard training, babysitting, pet first aid and the Lifeline program.

Freeholders Mark ‘American Red Cross Month’

FREEHOLD, NJ – To help raise awareness about the good work by the American Red Cross and the organization’s need for continued support, the Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders issued a proclamation recognizing March as American Red Cross Month.

The proclamation was presented during the March 28 freeholder meeting to Tim Settles, Regional Director of Disaster Services, and Chris Dempsey, Disaster Readiness & Response Specialist.

“Your team is out there helping people whenever there is a disaster, tragedy or major storm, and we thank you for your work and commitment,” Freeholder Director Thomas A. Arnone said. “Volunteerism is the foundation of this county and this great country, and nowhere is that more apparent than with the American Red Cross.”

The American Red Cross was created in 1881 by Clara Barton and officially chartered by Congress in 1900 to provide national and international relief during disasters, and to give relief to the military and serve as a means of communication between members of the Armed Forces and their families.

In 1943, President Franklin D. Roosevelt proclaimed the first Red Cross Month in support of Red Cross fundraising efforts to respond to needs brought on by World War II. Since that time, every president, including President Obama, has designated March as Red Cross Month.

The Jersey Coast Chapter was founded in 1917 along with several other chapters but during World War II, all Monmouth County chapters were united into one and headquartered in Shrewsbury.

The American Red Cross, Jersey Coast Chapter is a humanitarian organization with hundreds of volunteers who provide relief to victims of disasters and help people prevent, prepare for and respond to emergencies.

The Jersey Coast Chapter of the American Red Cross has enhanced the quality of life for our citizens through Armed Forces support, blood collections, and providing lifesaving courses in first aid, CPR, water safety, lifeguard training, babysitting, pet first aid and the Lifeline program.

Raising Awareness of Autism

Disorder affects social, learning and behavioral skills 

FREEHOLD, NJ – On March 28, the Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders presented a proclamation to commemorate Autism Awareness Month, which is observed in the month of April. The Board presented the proclamation to Autism New Jersey Board Chairman James Paone II of Freehold with the hope to raise public awareness of this developmental disorder.

Autism is a pervasive developmental disorder affecting social, learning and behavioral skills which include High Functioning Autism, Autism, Asperger’s Syndrome and Pervasive Developmental Disorder which manifests itself in the first three years of life. 

“Because of advocacy organizations such as Autism New Jersey, we can continue to help raise support and awareness of autism spectrum disorders,” said Freeholder Director Thomas A. Arnone. “The hard work and dedication of these organizations is vital for the individuals with autism and their families.”

Autism New Jersey is the largest statewide network of parents and professionals dedicated of improving the lives of individuals with autism spectrum disorders. Autism New Jersey works to enhance the resilience, abilities and quality of life of those affected.

Raising Awareness of Autism

Disorder affects social, learning and behavioral skills 

FREEHOLD, NJ – On March 28, the Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders presented a proclamation to commemorate Autism Awareness Month, which is observed in the month of April. The Board presented the proclamation to Autism New Jersey Board Chairman James Paone II of Freehold with the hope to raise public awareness of this developmental disorder.

Autism is a pervasive developmental disorder affecting social, learning and behavioral skills which include High Functioning Autism, Autism, Asperger’s Syndrome and Pervasive Developmental Disorder which manifests itself in the first three years of life. 

“Because of advocacy organizations such as Autism New Jersey, we can continue to help raise support and awareness of autism spectrum disorders,” said Freeholder Director Thomas A. Arnone. “The hard work and dedication of these organizations is vital for the individuals with autism and their families.”

Autism New Jersey is the largest statewide network of parents and professionals dedicated of improving the lives of individuals with autism spectrum disorders. Autism New Jersey works to enhance the resilience, abilities and quality of life of those affected.

Bacterial Meningitis Can Be Prevented

danvance_120The morning of February 24, 2004, was one Bob Werner would rather forget. It began when his 20-year-old, college student daughter wasn’t feeling well. “Becky had the chills and some fever,” said 55-year-old Werner of Mukwonago, Wisconsin. “I told her she probably had the flu, and to stay home, grab a blanket, and take ibuprofen.”

Becky stayed sick all day. At 1:00 a.m. the next morning, Bob’s wife found Becky moaning on the hallway floor and the same again at 3:00 a.m. Believing she had the flu, Bob decided he could delay taking her to the hospital until sunrise. When checking on her again at 5:00 a.m., Bob’s wife noticed Becky’s eyes had rolled into the back of her head.

At the hospital, her blood pressure was 65/37. Her kidneys shut down first, then her liver, and a doctor mentioned a blood infection. As it turned out, she had a form of bacterial meningitis and soon died. According to the National Institutes of Health, meningitis involves tissue inflammation surrounding the brain and spinal cord.

Werner said, “My wife and I just looked at each other through the tears and said, ‘What happened?’ Over time, we started the Becky Werner Meningitis Foundation because we thought if we hadn’t known about a vaccine that could have prevented meningitis, other families wouldn’t know. Becky had a strain of it that was fully preventable by vaccine. If having had the shot, she would be here today.”

Many physicians don’t mention the $100 shot because only 3,000 cases pop up annually, he said. Of the 3,000, about 300 die and another 700 acquire a permanent disability, such as sight and hearing loss or amputation.

How he wishes Becky were alive. His daughter had a big smile, was fun-loving, bubbly, athletic, had lots of friends, and was a “daddy’s girl,” he said. His daughter’s infection had been too far advanced for antibiotics to make any difference.

In part, the Becky Werner Meningitis Foundation invests donated funds into meningitis research at the Medical College of Wisconsin and financially helps affected families accumulating expenses, such as for service dogs. Said Werner, “The Centers for Disease Control recommends that children over age eleven get the shot. I tell parents to get informed and make a decision (about the shot). I don’t know who would decide not to do it. I lost a child that way.”

Contact: danieljvance.com [Sponsored by Palmer Bus Service and LittleGiantFudge.com.] 

Bacterial Meningitis Can Be Prevented

danvance_120The morning of February 24, 2004, was one Bob Werner would rather forget. It began when his 20-year-old, college student daughter wasn’t feeling well. “Becky had the chills and some fever,” said 55-year-old Werner of Mukwonago, Wisconsin. “I told her she probably had the flu, and to stay home, grab a blanket, and take ibuprofen.”

Becky stayed sick all day. At 1:00 a.m. the next morning, Bob’s wife found Becky moaning on the hallway floor and the same again at 3:00 a.m. Believing she had the flu, Bob decided he could delay taking her to the hospital until sunrise. When checking on her again at 5:00 a.m., Bob’s wife noticed Becky’s eyes had rolled into the back of her head.

At the hospital, her blood pressure was 65/37. Her kidneys shut down first, then her liver, and a doctor mentioned a blood infection. As it turned out, she had a form of bacterial meningitis and soon died. According to the National Institutes of Health, meningitis involves tissue inflammation surrounding the brain and spinal cord.

Werner said, “My wife and I just looked at each other through the tears and said, ‘What happened?’ Over time, we started the Becky Werner Meningitis Foundation because we thought if we hadn’t known about a vaccine that could have prevented meningitis, other families wouldn’t know. Becky had a strain of it that was fully preventable by vaccine. If having had the shot, she would be here today.”

Many physicians don’t mention the $100 shot because only 3,000 cases pop up annually, he said. Of the 3,000, about 300 die and another 700 acquire a permanent disability, such as sight and hearing loss or amputation.

How he wishes Becky were alive. His daughter had a big smile, was fun-loving, bubbly, athletic, had lots of friends, and was a “daddy’s girl,” he said. His daughter’s infection had been too far advanced for antibiotics to make any difference.

In part, the Becky Werner Meningitis Foundation invests donated funds into meningitis research at the Medical College of Wisconsin and financially helps affected families accumulating expenses, such as for service dogs. Said Werner, “The Centers for Disease Control recommends that children over age eleven get the shot. I tell parents to get informed and make a decision (about the shot). I don’t know who would decide not to do it. I lost a child that way.”

Contact: danieljvance.com [Sponsored by Palmer Bus Service and LittleGiantFudge.com.]