NJ State Police Alert: Alert: Statement Regarding Suspicious Letters

The Joint Terrorism Task Force and hazard materials units have responded to several locations that have received a suspicious letter and substance. There are no reported injuries at this time, and the locations are being secured. This situation is being thoroughly investigated and more information will be provided when it becomes available.

(nixel.com)

NJ State Police Alert: Alert: Statement Regarding Suspicious Letters

The Joint Terrorism Task Force and hazard materials units have responded to several locations that have received a suspicious letter and substance. There are no reported injuries at this time, and the locations are being secured. This situation is being thoroughly investigated and more information will be provided when it becomes available.

(nixel.com)

Middletown Boy Scouts Raising Funds for One of Their Own

bsa 140 joe steigerMIDDLETOWN, NJ – Troop 140 is holding a fundraiser for lifelong Middletown resident. Many of you may know Joey Steiger from the Fairview neighborhood.  He can often be seen riding his bike and helping out friends, neighbors and the community at large.  He is an Assistant Scoutmaster with Troop 140, Fairview School, where started as a young boy and continues to tirelessly help the Scouts of today.  Joey was hospitalized in the middle of December with major heart problems.  His mom, Nadine Fers, is doing everything possible for Joe.  

Continue reading Middletown Boy Scouts Raising Funds for One of Their Own

Middletown Boy Scouts Raising Funds for One of Their Own

bsa 140 joe steigerMIDDLETOWN, NJ – Troop 140 is holding a fundraiser for lifelong Middletown resident. Many of you may know Joey Steiger from the Fairview neighborhood.  He can often be seen riding his bike and helping out friends, neighbors and the community at large.  He is an Assistant Scoutmaster with Troop 140, Fairview School, where started as a young boy and continues to tirelessly help the Scouts of today.  Joey was hospitalized in the middle of December with major heart problems.  His mom, Nadine Fers, is doing everything possible for Joe.  

Continue reading Middletown Boy Scouts Raising Funds for One of Their Own

Internationally Renowned Puppeteer Uwe Spillman Set to Perform in Holmdel

Morristown & Holmdel, NJ – The non-profit German School of Morris County  www.glsmc.org and German School of Monmouth County  www.germanschoolmc.org will co-host the only New Jersey performances of international, award-winning puppeteer Uwe Spillmann, who will bring his original fairy tales from his native town of Eberholzen, Germany to New Jersey, during his national US tour. 

Performances are scheduled for Saturday, February 1 at 10:00 am and 11:00 am in Morristown at Morristown Beard School, 70 Whippany Road Morristown, and  at 4:00 pm at The German School of Monmouth County, 112 Middletown Road, Holmdel, NJ.  All performances, which are presented for English and German speakers, are free and open to the public.  Donations would be appreciated.

“Uwe’s visit in 2011 was a hit with all our students and we’re thrilled we can bring him to two locations in New Jersey this winter, says Principal Michaela Greco. “Our schools not only teach a language but bring cultural events for the community to enjoy.”

Traditional Characters Tell Modern Tales

Mr. Spillmann, known as “Der Kiepenkasper” writes original fairy tales and creates his own puppets including the traditional fun-loving Kasperle, funny pirate and bad witch that delight and enchant children. In Spillman’s theater, the children participate by waking up the puppets from their wicker basket (Kiepenkaste) to start the show. Mr. Spillman sounds the start of the story with his small wooden clarinet.  In the story of the Three Feathers, Kasper needs the children to help him “undo” the magic tricks he learned from a witch.  In his Trip to Pirate Island, he outwits a silly pirate who steals his gong. Spillman notes that in his experience all children, even those without any German knowledge, understand the plays and participate as the stories unfold.

According to childhood development experts puppets helps children express themselves, work out their fears and worries and deal with difficult situations through the carefree world of make-believe and role-playing skits.  Each performance ends with a meet and greet with Mr. Spillman and his friends.

Puppetry a Theater Tradition Since Medieval Times

Long before the characters from the Muppets, there were puppets that performed slapstick comedy.  Kasper – from ancient Persian – means “keeper of the treasure,” dates to the beginning of Christianity and is believed to have been named after Casper, one of the three Magi who visited the Christ Child.  The character also appeared in early mystery plays of the medieval Church.

Kasperltheater emerged in the 1700s and soon became synonymous with puppet theaters throughout southern Germany and Austria that featured Kasper, his friends Gretel and Seppel, and a varied cast of characters that usually include grandma, king, princess, witch, devil, robber, policeman, wizard and crocodile.    A more child-like version of Kasper appeared in Munich in 1858 to tell stories of good and evil and to beat the evil devil, witch and crocodile.

Contact [email protected] for more information about the performances. 

About the German Language School of Morris County (GLSMC) & German School of Monmouth County – GSMC http://www.germanschoolmc.org

Internationally Renowned Puppeteer Uwe Spillman Set to Perform in Holmdel

Morristown & Holmdel, NJ – The non-profit German School of Morris County  www.glsmc.org and German School of Monmouth County  www.germanschoolmc.org will co-host the only New Jersey performances of international, award-winning puppeteer Uwe Spillmann, who will bring his original fairy tales from his native town of Eberholzen, Germany to New Jersey, during his national US tour. 

Performances are scheduled for Saturday, February 1 at 10:00 am and 11:00 am in Morristown at Morristown Beard School, 70 Whippany Road Morristown, and  at 4:00 pm at The German School of Monmouth County, 112 Middletown Road, Holmdel, NJ.  All performances, which are presented for English and German speakers, are free and open to the public.  Donations would be appreciated.

“Uwe’s visit in 2011 was a hit with all our students and we’re thrilled we can bring him to two locations in New Jersey this winter, says Principal Michaela Greco. “Our schools not only teach a language but bring cultural events for the community to enjoy.”

Traditional Characters Tell Modern Tales

Mr. Spillmann, known as “Der Kiepenkasper” writes original fairy tales and creates his own puppets including the traditional fun-loving Kasperle, funny pirate and bad witch that delight and enchant children. In Spillman’s theater, the children participate by waking up the puppets from their wicker basket (Kiepenkaste) to start the show. Mr. Spillman sounds the start of the story with his small wooden clarinet.  In the story of the Three Feathers, Kasper needs the children to help him “undo” the magic tricks he learned from a witch.  In his Trip to Pirate Island, he outwits a silly pirate who steals his gong. Spillman notes that in his experience all children, even those without any German knowledge, understand the plays and participate as the stories unfold.

According to childhood development experts puppets helps children express themselves, work out their fears and worries and deal with difficult situations through the carefree world of make-believe and role-playing skits.  Each performance ends with a meet and greet with Mr. Spillman and his friends.

Puppetry a Theater Tradition Since Medieval Times

Long before the characters from the Muppets, there were puppets that performed slapstick comedy.  Kasper – from ancient Persian – means “keeper of the treasure,” dates to the beginning of Christianity and is believed to have been named after Casper, one of the three Magi who visited the Christ Child.  The character also appeared in early mystery plays of the medieval Church.

Kasperltheater emerged in the 1700s and soon became synonymous with puppet theaters throughout southern Germany and Austria that featured Kasper, his friends Gretel and Seppel, and a varied cast of characters that usually include grandma, king, princess, witch, devil, robber, policeman, wizard and crocodile.    A more child-like version of Kasper appeared in Munich in 1858 to tell stories of good and evil and to beat the evil devil, witch and crocodile.

Contact [email protected] for more information about the performances. 

About the German Language School of Morris County (GLSMC) & German School of Monmouth County – GSMC http://www.germanschoolmc.org

Adults Learn to Call 9-1-1 Through ACES Program

Keansburg, NJ – Monmouth County Sheriff Shaun Golden wants to ensure that adults know how to utilize the Monmouth County 9-1-1 emergency system in the most effective manner. On Jan. 30, ACES 9-1-1, (Adults Calling Emergency Services) was presented at the Bayshore Senior Center in Keansburg. ACES, was created by public safety telecommunicators and is offered to groups and organizations throughout Monmouth County.

“In 2013, the total number of calls processed through the Monmouth County 9-1-1 Communications Centers was 534,946. Approximately 60,000 of those calls were non- emergency related, which can tie up lines for actual emergencies,” said Sheriff Shaun Golden. “It’s critical for people who live and work in Monmouth County to know that 9-1-1 should only be dialed in the event of an emergency.”

ACES 9-1-1 instructors focus on how 9-1-1 works and how using 9-1-1 properly can help ensure rapid response during emergencies. Adults are told what constitutes an emergency, how to interact with the public safety telecommunicator on the phone during the emergency, when other non-emergency phone numbers should be used and the role of the public safety telecommunicator.

“There are times when people question whether they should or should not call for help and what constitutes an emergency. ACES 9-1-1 clarifies those issues and much more,” said Sheriff Golden.

The Monmouth County 9-1-1 Communications Centers serve 44 of the county’s 53 municipalities and operates 24 hours a day 365 days a year.

ACES 9-1-1, is a partnership of the Monmouth County Sheriff’s Office, Monmouth County Office on Aging and the Monmouth County Department of Economic Development and Tourism.

Adults Learn to Call 9-1-1 Through ACES Program

Keansburg, NJ – Monmouth County Sheriff Shaun Golden wants to ensure that adults know how to utilize the Monmouth County 9-1-1 emergency system in the most effective manner. On Jan. 30, ACES 9-1-1, (Adults Calling Emergency Services) was presented at the Bayshore Senior Center in Keansburg. ACES, was created by public safety telecommunicators and is offered to groups and organizations throughout Monmouth County.

“In 2013, the total number of calls processed through the Monmouth County 9-1-1 Communications Centers was 534,946. Approximately 60,000 of those calls were non- emergency related, which can tie up lines for actual emergencies,” said Sheriff Shaun Golden. “It’s critical for people who live and work in Monmouth County to know that 9-1-1 should only be dialed in the event of an emergency.”

ACES 9-1-1 instructors focus on how 9-1-1 works and how using 9-1-1 properly can help ensure rapid response during emergencies. Adults are told what constitutes an emergency, how to interact with the public safety telecommunicator on the phone during the emergency, when other non-emergency phone numbers should be used and the role of the public safety telecommunicator.

“There are times when people question whether they should or should not call for help and what constitutes an emergency. ACES 9-1-1 clarifies those issues and much more,” said Sheriff Golden.

The Monmouth County 9-1-1 Communications Centers serve 44 of the county’s 53 municipalities and operates 24 hours a day 365 days a year.

ACES 9-1-1, is a partnership of the Monmouth County Sheriff’s Office, Monmouth County Office on Aging and the Monmouth County Department of Economic Development and Tourism.

Pallone Admonishes Christie’s Elimination of New Jersey’s Comprehensive Tobacco Control Program

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Today, Congressman Frank Pallone, Jr. (NJ-06) sent a letter to Governor Chris Christie (R-NJ) admonishing his administration’s elimination of New Jersey’s Comprehensive Tobacco Control Program. Programs like this serve as a statewide effort to establish smoke-free policies, help tobacco users quit smoking, and prevent potential users from becoming addicted.  The funding for the New Jersey’s Tobacco Control Program, first slashed completely in Fiscal Year 2013, remains at zero for Fiscal Year 2014.  

Today, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released their http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/stateandcommunity/best_practices/index.htm Best Practices for Comprehensive Tobacco Control Programs—2014 http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/stateandcommunity/best_practices/index.htm”>report. New Jersey currently ranks last among the 50 states and District of Columbia in meeting the funding levels for prevention and cessation programs recommended by the CDC.  The CDC recommends that New Jersey allocate $103.3 million, or about 10 percent of its tobacco revenues, toward these programs, in order to have a substantial effect on reducing smoking rates and tobacco-related death and disease in the state.

Congressman Pallone has repeatedly drawn attention to the risks that tobacco continues to pose to public health.  Most recently, he called on the Obama Administration to release stricter rules and regulations regarding the manufacture, distribution, and marketing of Electronic Cigarettes, also known as e-cigarettes.  He has expressed serious concern regarding marketing tactics being employed by some e-cigarette companies, which are similar to those previously used by tobacco companies to appeal to younger people, such as through candy flavoring, cartoon images, and event sponsorships.

Below is the full text of the letter:

January 30, 2014

Governor Chris Christie          
Office of the Governor

PO Box 001

Trenton, NJ  08625

Dear Governor Christie:

            It has come to my attention that New Jersey’s Comprehensive Tobacco Control Program has been eliminated, cutting all funding for tobacco control programs.  I find it unconscionable that New Jersey ranks last among the 50 states and District of Columbia in meeting the funding levels recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).  The state collects about $1 billion each year in tobacco-related revenues, yet it is the only state to dedicate nothing to tobacco prevention and cessation programs in fiscal year 2014. 

CDC recommends that New Jersey allocate $103.3 million, or about 10 percent of its tobacco revenues, toward prevention and cessation programs in order to have a substantial effect on reducing smoking rates and tobacco-related death and disease.  Though I recognize that resources are limited and state budgets across the country are tight, it is unacceptable to zero out the funding for tobacco control programs completely.

The economic toll of tobacco use in health expenditures and lost productivity will end up costing New Jerseyans more than front-end investment in prevention.  The most recent CDC estimate of medical costs in the state due to smoking is over $4 billion annually, and about a third of those costs are sustained by Medicaid.  In addition, CDC has estimated that smoking contributes to over $2 billion in lost productivity costs. 

Comprehensive tobacco control programs do work in reducing youth initiation of smoking and tobacco-related death, disease, health care costs, and lost productivity.  More than 6,000 children become new daily smokers every year in New Jersey, and over 10,000 adult residents die each year due to smoking.  States such as New York and California that have made larger, sustained investments in tobacco control have seen a faster decline in smoking prevalence both in youth and adults as funding for these programs increased. 

I urge you not to sacrifice state tobacco prevention programs in an attempt to balance the state budget.  Tobacco-related revenues collected by the state should be substantially used for the public health, especially in preventing tobacco use in children and adolescents. 

Pallone Admonishes Christie’s Elimination of New Jersey’s Comprehensive Tobacco Control Program

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Today, Congressman Frank Pallone, Jr. (NJ-06) sent a letter to Governor Chris Christie (R-NJ) admonishing his administration’s elimination of New Jersey’s Comprehensive Tobacco Control Program. Programs like this serve as a statewide effort to establish smoke-free policies, help tobacco users quit smoking, and prevent potential users from becoming addicted.  The funding for the New Jersey’s Tobacco Control Program, first slashed completely in Fiscal Year 2013, remains at zero for Fiscal Year 2014.  

Today, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released their http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/stateandcommunity/best_practices/index.htm Best Practices for Comprehensive Tobacco Control Programs—2014 http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/stateandcommunity/best_practices/index.htm”>report. New Jersey currently ranks last among the 50 states and District of Columbia in meeting the funding levels for prevention and cessation programs recommended by the CDC.  The CDC recommends that New Jersey allocate $103.3 million, or about 10 percent of its tobacco revenues, toward these programs, in order to have a substantial effect on reducing smoking rates and tobacco-related death and disease in the state.

Congressman Pallone has repeatedly drawn attention to the risks that tobacco continues to pose to public health.  Most recently, he called on the Obama Administration to release stricter rules and regulations regarding the manufacture, distribution, and marketing of Electronic Cigarettes, also known as e-cigarettes.  He has expressed serious concern regarding marketing tactics being employed by some e-cigarette companies, which are similar to those previously used by tobacco companies to appeal to younger people, such as through candy flavoring, cartoon images, and event sponsorships.

Below is the full text of the letter:

January 30, 2014

Governor Chris Christie          
Office of the Governor

PO Box 001

Trenton, NJ  08625

Dear Governor Christie:

            It has come to my attention that New Jersey’s Comprehensive Tobacco Control Program has been eliminated, cutting all funding for tobacco control programs.  I find it unconscionable that New Jersey ranks last among the 50 states and District of Columbia in meeting the funding levels recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).  The state collects about $1 billion each year in tobacco-related revenues, yet it is the only state to dedicate nothing to tobacco prevention and cessation programs in fiscal year 2014. 

CDC recommends that New Jersey allocate $103.3 million, or about 10 percent of its tobacco revenues, toward prevention and cessation programs in order to have a substantial effect on reducing smoking rates and tobacco-related death and disease.  Though I recognize that resources are limited and state budgets across the country are tight, it is unacceptable to zero out the funding for tobacco control programs completely.

The economic toll of tobacco use in health expenditures and lost productivity will end up costing New Jerseyans more than front-end investment in prevention.  The most recent CDC estimate of medical costs in the state due to smoking is over $4 billion annually, and about a third of those costs are sustained by Medicaid.  In addition, CDC has estimated that smoking contributes to over $2 billion in lost productivity costs. 

Comprehensive tobacco control programs do work in reducing youth initiation of smoking and tobacco-related death, disease, health care costs, and lost productivity.  More than 6,000 children become new daily smokers every year in New Jersey, and over 10,000 adult residents die each year due to smoking.  States such as New York and California that have made larger, sustained investments in tobacco control have seen a faster decline in smoking prevalence both in youth and adults as funding for these programs increased. 

I urge you not to sacrifice state tobacco prevention programs in an attempt to balance the state budget.  Tobacco-related revenues collected by the state should be substantially used for the public health, especially in preventing tobacco use in children and adolescents.