Boy Scout Troop 22 Honors Eagle Scout Christopher Federico

troop22 chris federico eaglePHOTO: Eagle Scout Christopher Federico is congratulated by Troop 22 Scoutmaster Allen Resch.

ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS, NJ – Christopher Federico, 18, son of Eric and Fiona Layton of Middletown, NJ has achieved Boy Scouting’s highest rank: Eagle Scout. Less than 4 per­cent of all Boy Scouts attain this honor.

Chris is a member of Boy Scout Troop 22 in Atlantic Highlands, one of the first Boy Scout troops established in the United States who celebrated their 100 year anniversary in 2011. Troop 22 is sponsored by the United Methodist Church in Atlantic Highlands, under the leadership of Scoutmaster Allen Resch.

Continue reading Boy Scout Troop 22 Honors Eagle Scout Christopher Federico

Boy Scout Troop 22 Honors Eagle Scout Christopher Federico

troop22 chris federico eaglePHOTO: Eagle Scout Christopher Federico is congratulated by Troop 22 Scoutmaster Allen Resch.

ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS, NJ – Christopher Federico, 18, son of Eric and Fiona Layton of Middletown, NJ has achieved Boy Scouting’s highest rank: Eagle Scout. Less than 4 per­cent of all Boy Scouts attain this honor.

Chris is a member of Boy Scout Troop 22 in Atlantic Highlands, one of the first Boy Scout troops established in the United States who celebrated their 100 year anniversary in 2011. Troop 22 is sponsored by the United Methodist Church in Atlantic Highlands, under the leadership of Scoutmaster Allen Resch.

Continue reading Boy Scout Troop 22 Honors Eagle Scout Christopher Federico

Regional Rush Hour Delays Costing Motorists 74 Hours Annually

Congestion costs per commuter in 2014 – $1,739

Hamilton, NJ – AAA Mid-Atlantic is calling attention to a new report produced by INRIX and the Texas A&M Transportation Institute (TTI) showing that traffic congestion has returned to pre-recession levels in America. In the report, the New York –Newark region (comprised of NY, NJ, and CT) ranks 2nd in costs ($1,739) and 4th in delays (74 hours) per commuter annually.

Residents that fall into the Philadelphia region (comprised of PA, NJ, DE and MD) have a more favorable outlook with a loss of only 48 hours commuting and $1,112 in congestion cost.  Washington DC topped the list with a whopping 82 hours of delay per commuter and $1,834 in congestion cost. 

According to the 2015 Urban Mobility Scorecard, travel delays due to traffic congestion kept drivers across the country in their vehicles for almost 7 billion extra hours in 2014. This caused those same drivers to waste more than 3 billion gallons of fuel. These new numbers are the result of the continually improving economy and lower gas prices, which are encouraging people to drive at historic levels.

New York –Newark NY-NJ-CT Region, for 2014:

  • 1st in terms of total congestion costs: $14,712,000
  • 2nd in costs per peak automobile commuter: $1,739
  • 4th in annual delay per peak automobile commuter: 74 hours
  • 1st  in annual excess fuel consumed per peak auto commuter: 35 gallons

“Drivers in the New Jersey metro area will tell you that congestion is bad and commute times are getting worse,” said Tracy Noble, spokesperson for AAA Mid-Atlantic.  “This study underscores the dire need at both the Federal and state level to properly fund our aging transportation infrastructure.”

Americans have driven more than 3 trillion miles in the last year, according to recent data from the U.S. Department of Transportation. This is a new record, surpassing the 2007 peak just before the global financial crisis. Report authors say the U.S. needs more roadway and transit investment to meet the demands of population growth and economic expansion, but added capacity alone can’t solve congestion problems.

“AAA Mid-Atlantic recognizes that there is no silver bullet and no one-size fits all approach to solving this problem,” Noble added.

AAA encourages the following approaches to alleviate congestion, where appropriate:

  • maximizing the efficiency of or adding capacity to critical corridors,
  • smarter use of existing road networks (use of intelligent transportation systems, in-vehicle and in-road safety devices, improved commercial vehicle operations, advanced emergency assistance),
  • improving traffic management systems (synchronized traffic signals, computerized traffic control coordination, flextime, telecommuting, carpools), 
  • maintaining and improving alternatives to driving (public transportation, bicycling, walking),
  • changing commuting patterns (for example, flexible work hours).

 

Regional Rush Hour Delays Costing Motorists 74 Hours Annually

Congestion costs per commuter in 2014 – $1,739

Hamilton, NJ – AAA Mid-Atlantic is calling attention to a new report produced by INRIX and the Texas A&M Transportation Institute (TTI) showing that traffic congestion has returned to pre-recession levels in America. In the report, the New York –Newark region (comprised of NY, NJ, and CT) ranks 2nd in costs ($1,739) and 4th in delays (74 hours) per commuter annually.

Residents that fall into the Philadelphia region (comprised of PA, NJ, DE and MD) have a more favorable outlook with a loss of only 48 hours commuting and $1,112 in congestion cost.  Washington DC topped the list with a whopping 82 hours of delay per commuter and $1,834 in congestion cost. 

According to the 2015 Urban Mobility Scorecard, travel delays due to traffic congestion kept drivers across the country in their vehicles for almost 7 billion extra hours in 2014. This caused those same drivers to waste more than 3 billion gallons of fuel. These new numbers are the result of the continually improving economy and lower gas prices, which are encouraging people to drive at historic levels.

New York –Newark NY-NJ-CT Region, for 2014:

  • 1st in terms of total congestion costs: $14,712,000
  • 2nd in costs per peak automobile commuter: $1,739
  • 4th in annual delay per peak automobile commuter: 74 hours
  • 1st  in annual excess fuel consumed per peak auto commuter: 35 gallons

“Drivers in the New Jersey metro area will tell you that congestion is bad and commute times are getting worse,” said Tracy Noble, spokesperson for AAA Mid-Atlantic.  “This study underscores the dire need at both the Federal and state level to properly fund our aging transportation infrastructure.”

Americans have driven more than 3 trillion miles in the last year, according to recent data from the U.S. Department of Transportation. This is a new record, surpassing the 2007 peak just before the global financial crisis. Report authors say the U.S. needs more roadway and transit investment to meet the demands of population growth and economic expansion, but added capacity alone can’t solve congestion problems.

“AAA Mid-Atlantic recognizes that there is no silver bullet and no one-size fits all approach to solving this problem,” Noble added.

AAA encourages the following approaches to alleviate congestion, where appropriate:

  • maximizing the efficiency of or adding capacity to critical corridors,
  • smarter use of existing road networks (use of intelligent transportation systems, in-vehicle and in-road safety devices, improved commercial vehicle operations, advanced emergency assistance),
  • improving traffic management systems (synchronized traffic signals, computerized traffic control coordination, flextime, telecommuting, carpools), 
  • maintaining and improving alternatives to driving (public transportation, bicycling, walking),
  • changing commuting patterns (for example, flexible work hours).

 

Monmouth Beekeeper Named to NJ State Board of Agriculture

njdoa angelo trapani

PHOTO: Monmouth County beekeeper and mum producer Angelo Trapani being sworn in.
Kline, Trapani Sworn in to 4-year terms, Doyle Fills Vacant Seat

TRENTON – Cumberland County fruit and vegetable farmer Shirley Todd Kline, Monmouth County beekeeper and mum producer Angelo Trapani and Hunterdon County livestock and hay producer Erick K. Doyle are the newest members of the New Jersey State Board of Agriculture. 

The New Jersey State Board of Agriculture installed Kline and Trapani to four-year terms on July 22 during its reorganization meeting held in Hamilton Township.  Doyle was installed at the Board’s regular meeting in Trenton on August 26 to fill an unexpired term ending in 2017.

Kline, Trapani and Doyle were elected by the delegates at the February 2015 State Agricultural Convention for recommendation to the Governor for nomination and later confirmed by the State Senate. 

“Shirley Kline, Angelo Trapani and Erick Doyle are great additions to the State Board of Agriculture, demonstrating the diversity of New Jersey’s agriculture industry,” said New Jersey Secretary of Agriculture Douglas H. Fisher.  “They bring their vast knowledge and experience to the board, which sets policy for the industry throughout the entire state.”

Shirley Kline earned Bachelor of Science in plant pathology and Masters of Science degree in vegetable production from Cornell University.  She operates Happy Valley Berry Farm in Bridgeton growing mixed vegetables and fresh market raspberries, blackberries and strawberries.  She offers Community Supported Agriculture and sells wholesale to farm markets and food co-ops.  She is a food safety consultant and horticulturist.  Kline is the past-President of the Cumberland County Board of Agriculture, a New Jersey Farm Bureau director and a member of the Vegetable Growers Association of New Jersey and the Cumberland County Historical Society.

Angelo Trapani operates A. Trapani Farms and Trapper’s Honey in Clarksburg, producing honey and providing pollination services to other farmers.  He and his wife, Anna, also grow field mums.  Angelo studied engineering at Mercer County Community College and HVAC at Mercer County Technical School.  He is currently president of the Monmouth County Board of Agriculture, first-Vice President of the New Jersey Beekeepers Association and a New Jersey Farm Bureau alternate director.  He is a member of the New Jersey Vegetable Growers Association, Central jersey Beekeepers, Tri-County Co-op Market, NJ Farmers Director Marketing Association, American Honey Producers Association, American Beekeeping Federation and the New Jersey Agricultural Society.

Erick Doyle, who owns Readington River Buffalo Company in Readington, earned a Bachelor of Arts in mathematics from Colgate University.  He manages a heard of bison ranging from 90 to 150 head on 110 acres of pasture.  He oversees breeding, nutrition, vaccination and transportation.  He manages an on-site retail operation with the meat raised on the farm and locally sourced agricultural products.  He also produces 200 acres of hay per year to feed the herd and to supplement neighboring farmers.  Doyle also hosts Rutgers University students in an annual practicum to teach proper handling methods of large animals. He is currently second vice-president of the Hunterdon County Board of Agriculture, a 2009 graduate of the New Jersey Agricultural Leadership Development Program, a Sunday school instructor and an Eagle Scout.

During the reorganization meeting, Martin Bullock, a Cream Ridge hay, grain and Christmas tree farmer, was elected President of the board and Marilyn Russo, a Chesterfield fruit and vegetable farmer, was selected as vice-president.  In addition, Steve Wagner, who represented the nursery industry, resigned and Robert Swanekamp, a grower of plugs and bedding plants in Upper Freehold Township, was chosen to fill the open seat. 

The State Board of Agriculture comprises eight members who serve for four years, with two members being replaced each year. By law, at least four of its members must represent the top commodity groups in the state.  Members serve without salary.  For more information, visit www.nj.gov/agriculture/about/sba

Monmouth Beekeeper Named to NJ State Board of Agriculture

njdoa angelo trapani

PHOTO: Monmouth County beekeeper and mum producer Angelo Trapani being sworn in.
Kline, Trapani Sworn in to 4-year terms, Doyle Fills Vacant Seat

TRENTON – Cumberland County fruit and vegetable farmer Shirley Todd Kline, Monmouth County beekeeper and mum producer Angelo Trapani and Hunterdon County livestock and hay producer Erick K. Doyle are the newest members of the New Jersey State Board of Agriculture. 

The New Jersey State Board of Agriculture installed Kline and Trapani to four-year terms on July 22 during its reorganization meeting held in Hamilton Township.  Doyle was installed at the Board’s regular meeting in Trenton on August 26 to fill an unexpired term ending in 2017.

Kline, Trapani and Doyle were elected by the delegates at the February 2015 State Agricultural Convention for recommendation to the Governor for nomination and later confirmed by the State Senate. 

“Shirley Kline, Angelo Trapani and Erick Doyle are great additions to the State Board of Agriculture, demonstrating the diversity of New Jersey’s agriculture industry,” said New Jersey Secretary of Agriculture Douglas H. Fisher.  “They bring their vast knowledge and experience to the board, which sets policy for the industry throughout the entire state.”

Shirley Kline earned Bachelor of Science in plant pathology and Masters of Science degree in vegetable production from Cornell University.  She operates Happy Valley Berry Farm in Bridgeton growing mixed vegetables and fresh market raspberries, blackberries and strawberries.  She offers Community Supported Agriculture and sells wholesale to farm markets and food co-ops.  She is a food safety consultant and horticulturist.  Kline is the past-President of the Cumberland County Board of Agriculture, a New Jersey Farm Bureau director and a member of the Vegetable Growers Association of New Jersey and the Cumberland County Historical Society.

Angelo Trapani operates A. Trapani Farms and Trapper’s Honey in Clarksburg, producing honey and providing pollination services to other farmers.  He and his wife, Anna, also grow field mums.  Angelo studied engineering at Mercer County Community College and HVAC at Mercer County Technical School.  He is currently president of the Monmouth County Board of Agriculture, first-Vice President of the New Jersey Beekeepers Association and a New Jersey Farm Bureau alternate director.  He is a member of the New Jersey Vegetable Growers Association, Central jersey Beekeepers, Tri-County Co-op Market, NJ Farmers Director Marketing Association, American Honey Producers Association, American Beekeeping Federation and the New Jersey Agricultural Society.

Erick Doyle, who owns Readington River Buffalo Company in Readington, earned a Bachelor of Arts in mathematics from Colgate University.  He manages a heard of bison ranging from 90 to 150 head on 110 acres of pasture.  He oversees breeding, nutrition, vaccination and transportation.  He manages an on-site retail operation with the meat raised on the farm and locally sourced agricultural products.  He also produces 200 acres of hay per year to feed the herd and to supplement neighboring farmers.  Doyle also hosts Rutgers University students in an annual practicum to teach proper handling methods of large animals. He is currently second vice-president of the Hunterdon County Board of Agriculture, a 2009 graduate of the New Jersey Agricultural Leadership Development Program, a Sunday school instructor and an Eagle Scout.

During the reorganization meeting, Martin Bullock, a Cream Ridge hay, grain and Christmas tree farmer, was elected President of the board and Marilyn Russo, a Chesterfield fruit and vegetable farmer, was selected as vice-president.  In addition, Steve Wagner, who represented the nursery industry, resigned and Robert Swanekamp, a grower of plugs and bedding plants in Upper Freehold Township, was chosen to fill the open seat. 

The State Board of Agriculture comprises eight members who serve for four years, with two members being replaced each year. By law, at least four of its members must represent the top commodity groups in the state.  Members serve without salary.  For more information, visit www.nj.gov/agriculture/about/sba

Pallone Calls on FDA to Regulate E-Cigarettes

WASHINGTON, DC – Congressman Pallone, Jr. (NJ-06), Ranking Member of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, has called on the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to finalize a proposed Food and Drug Administration (FDA) rule governing the regulation of electronic cigarettes, also known as e-cigarettes, and other tobacco products.  Congressman Gene Green (TX-29), Ranking Member of the Subcommittee on Health, co-signed the letter. 

Through the 2009 Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act, FDA has oversight authority over cigarettes and smokeless tobacco.  However, a rule proposed by FDA would formally assert the agency’s authority to regulate e-cigarettes, cigars and pipe tobacco.  The proposed regulation would prohibit e-cigarette sales to minors, restrict vending machine sales, and require manufacturers to list ingredients and ensure that labeling is not false or misleading.  Pallone applauded these measures along with additional oversight provisions within the proposed rule.  However, he urged the agency to take further steps and regulate the use of flavorings and preventing companies from marketing e-cigarette products to children.

In the letter, Pallone wrote, “We are concerned that the longer we delay oversight of unregulated tobacco products—e-cigarettes and cigars, and pipe tobacco products—the more harm these products will cause to the health of our nation.  For far too long, the tobacco industry has exploited loopholes and continued to market its products to children…we ask for your leadership in ensuring that the final deeming regulation does not exempt any tobacco products.” 

Congressman Pallone has repeatedly drawn attention to the risks that tobacco products and nicotine pose to public health.  Most recently, he called on the U.S. Department of Transportation to ban e-cigarettes on airplanes.  He has also urged chain pharmacies across the country to stop selling tobacco, including e-cigarettes, and has consistently expressed serious concerns regarding the marketing tactics used by e-cigarette companies to appeal to younger people, such as through candy flavoring, cartoon images, and event sponsorships.

New Jersey has led the way, becoming the first state in the nation to ban the use of e-cigarettes in indoor public places and their sale to those 19 and younger.  Since then, multiple New Jersey municipalities and counties have considered broader bans that have been necessary in the absence of clear federal regulation through the FDA.

 

 

Pallone Calls on FDA to Regulate E-Cigarettes

WASHINGTON, DC – Congressman Pallone, Jr. (NJ-06), Ranking Member of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, has called on the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to finalize a proposed Food and Drug Administration (FDA) rule governing the regulation of electronic cigarettes, also known as e-cigarettes, and other tobacco products.  Congressman Gene Green (TX-29), Ranking Member of the Subcommittee on Health, co-signed the letter. 

Through the 2009 Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act, FDA has oversight authority over cigarettes and smokeless tobacco.  However, a rule proposed by FDA would formally assert the agency’s authority to regulate e-cigarettes, cigars and pipe tobacco.  The proposed regulation would prohibit e-cigarette sales to minors, restrict vending machine sales, and require manufacturers to list ingredients and ensure that labeling is not false or misleading.  Pallone applauded these measures along with additional oversight provisions within the proposed rule.  However, he urged the agency to take further steps and regulate the use of flavorings and preventing companies from marketing e-cigarette products to children.

In the letter, Pallone wrote, “We are concerned that the longer we delay oversight of unregulated tobacco products—e-cigarettes and cigars, and pipe tobacco products—the more harm these products will cause to the health of our nation.  For far too long, the tobacco industry has exploited loopholes and continued to market its products to children…we ask for your leadership in ensuring that the final deeming regulation does not exempt any tobacco products.” 

Congressman Pallone has repeatedly drawn attention to the risks that tobacco products and nicotine pose to public health.  Most recently, he called on the U.S. Department of Transportation to ban e-cigarettes on airplanes.  He has also urged chain pharmacies across the country to stop selling tobacco, including e-cigarettes, and has consistently expressed serious concerns regarding the marketing tactics used by e-cigarette companies to appeal to younger people, such as through candy flavoring, cartoon images, and event sponsorships.

New Jersey has led the way, becoming the first state in the nation to ban the use of e-cigarettes in indoor public places and their sale to those 19 and younger.  Since then, multiple New Jersey municipalities and counties have considered broader bans that have been necessary in the absence of clear federal regulation through the FDA.

 

 

Escape Room Attraction Opens in Red Bank in October

trap door posterRED BANK, NJ – TRAP DOOR is a live action Escape Room attraction opening this fall within 60 White Street, Red Bank, NJ. The thrilling story allows free roaming throughout our 2 floors of space. Trap Door features immersive theatre, live streaming, and alternate reality gaming.

Step into the mental dungeons of Trap Door Escape Rooms and challenge yourself both physically and mentally in this real life gaming experience opening October 1st in Red Bank, NJ. Continue reading Escape Room Attraction Opens in Red Bank in October

Escape Room Attraction Opens in Red Bank in October

trap door posterRED BANK, NJ – TRAP DOOR is a live action Escape Room attraction opening this fall within 60 White Street, Red Bank, NJ. The thrilling story allows free roaming throughout our 2 floors of space. Trap Door features immersive theatre, live streaming, and alternate reality gaming.

Step into the mental dungeons of Trap Door Escape Rooms and challenge yourself both physically and mentally in this real life gaming experience opening October 1st in Red Bank, NJ. Continue reading Escape Room Attraction Opens in Red Bank in October