Caregiver Retreat Set for Saturday, Nov. 14

Annual event supports and provides respite to those who care for older loved ones

EATONTOWN, NJ –Taking care of an elderly parent or loved one can be both an emotional and physical drain on caregivers and their families. That’s why it’s important for caregivers to care for themselves, even just for one day.

To help caregivers, the Monmouth County Office on Aging is sponsoring a free caregiver retreat from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 14 at the Sheraton Hotel on Route 35 North in Eatontown.

The program, designed for those who care for people over age 60, includes a continental breakfast, lunch and access to caregiver resources. Registration is required due to space limitations. Register by calling 732-431-7450.

“Many people do not consider themselves caregivers,” said Freeholder John P. Curley, liaison to the County’s Office on Aging. “Yet, when they think about all they do for a loved one and how much time they spend doing it, they realize that they are caregivers. They do it because that’s what families do for the people they love.”

“We teach caregivers how to care for themselves as they are caring for someone else,” said Colleen Smith, the County’s caregiver specialist. “That’s important because if you don’t have the energy or a good frame of mind to care for yourself, you’re not going to be able to take care of someone else.”

The keynote address will be given by Rosemarie Poverman, MSW, LMFT, LCSW, who will present “The Positive Power of Humor” which will stress taking responsibility for one’s thinking, adjusting our perceptions about the challenges of caregiving and learning to thrive, not just survive.

Also on the program are:

  • An explanation of Medicaid programs and processes (including home care services)
  • Stress Reduction Through Yoga
  • Mindfulness Meditation for Stress & Anxiety Relief

“Caregiving can be defined as around-the-clock care for someone at home, or someone who has already had to place a loved one in a facility and still visits them once a day or several times a week,” said Sue Moleon, director of the Division of Aging, Disability and Veterans Services. “Or, it could be someone caring for them long-distance and flying to see them every couple of months. It’s all caregiving and it’s all stressful.”

Attendees will have access to nearly two dozen local care providers and resources, including the County’s Office on Aging, Disabilities and Veterans Services, Alzheimer’s Association, Visiting Physicians Services and a host of elder care providers.  

Vendors that will be in attendance include:

  • Alzheimers Association
  • Ascend Hospice
  • Beacon Health & Social Services (PACE)
  • Brightstar Care
  • Cancer Support Community
  • Care 2 Caregivers
  • Caregivers of New Jersey
  • Elder Life Management
  • Family and Children’s Services, Long Branch
  • Gary Garland Legal Services
  • Halcyon Elder Care
  • Imperial HealthCare
  • MOCEANS
  • O.E.I./Captel
  • Onora Health Residential Facilities
  • RJ Healthcare
  • SCAN (Social Community Activities Network), Eatontown
  • Senior Mix Adult Day Care
  • Solana Assisted Living
  • St. Barnabas Health Care System
  • Visiting Physicians
  • We Care Adult Care
  • Monmouth County Division on Aging, Disabilities & Veterans Services

“This is a day for caregivers to indulge themselves,” Smith said. “Quite a few vendors will be providing complimentary therapies, plus there will be door prizes and gift baskets.”

The program will connect caregivers with an array of service providers who will be able to distribute information about a variety of services involving care for the aged and how to access those services. Among the services included are adult day care, respite care and home health agencies.

The program is being funded through the New Jersey Department of Human Services, Division on Aging Services.

The County’s Office on Aging offers information about the services, programs and resources available to residents 60 years of age and older. Programs funded through the Office on Aging include providing supportive services for caregivers, transportation, home care, physical fitness, education and recreation. The Office on Aging can be reached at 732-431-7450.

 

Caregiver Retreat Set for Saturday, Nov. 14

Annual event supports and provides respite to those who care for older loved ones

EATONTOWN, NJ –Taking care of an elderly parent or loved one can be both an emotional and physical drain on caregivers and their families. That’s why it’s important for caregivers to care for themselves, even just for one day.

To help caregivers, the Monmouth County Office on Aging is sponsoring a free caregiver retreat from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 14 at the Sheraton Hotel on Route 35 North in Eatontown.

The program, designed for those who care for people over age 60, includes a continental breakfast, lunch and access to caregiver resources. Registration is required due to space limitations. Register by calling 732-431-7450.

“Many people do not consider themselves caregivers,” said Freeholder John P. Curley, liaison to the County’s Office on Aging. “Yet, when they think about all they do for a loved one and how much time they spend doing it, they realize that they are caregivers. They do it because that’s what families do for the people they love.”

“We teach caregivers how to care for themselves as they are caring for someone else,” said Colleen Smith, the County’s caregiver specialist. “That’s important because if you don’t have the energy or a good frame of mind to care for yourself, you’re not going to be able to take care of someone else.”

The keynote address will be given by Rosemarie Poverman, MSW, LMFT, LCSW, who will present “The Positive Power of Humor” which will stress taking responsibility for one’s thinking, adjusting our perceptions about the challenges of caregiving and learning to thrive, not just survive.

Also on the program are:

  • An explanation of Medicaid programs and processes (including home care services)
  • Stress Reduction Through Yoga
  • Mindfulness Meditation for Stress & Anxiety Relief

“Caregiving can be defined as around-the-clock care for someone at home, or someone who has already had to place a loved one in a facility and still visits them once a day or several times a week,” said Sue Moleon, director of the Division of Aging, Disability and Veterans Services. “Or, it could be someone caring for them long-distance and flying to see them every couple of months. It’s all caregiving and it’s all stressful.”

Attendees will have access to nearly two dozen local care providers and resources, including the County’s Office on Aging, Disabilities and Veterans Services, Alzheimer’s Association, Visiting Physicians Services and a host of elder care providers.  

Vendors that will be in attendance include:

  • Alzheimers Association
  • Ascend Hospice
  • Beacon Health & Social Services (PACE)
  • Brightstar Care
  • Cancer Support Community
  • Care 2 Caregivers
  • Caregivers of New Jersey
  • Elder Life Management
  • Family and Children’s Services, Long Branch
  • Gary Garland Legal Services
  • Halcyon Elder Care
  • Imperial HealthCare
  • MOCEANS
  • O.E.I./Captel
  • Onora Health Residential Facilities
  • RJ Healthcare
  • SCAN (Social Community Activities Network), Eatontown
  • Senior Mix Adult Day Care
  • Solana Assisted Living
  • St. Barnabas Health Care System
  • Visiting Physicians
  • We Care Adult Care
  • Monmouth County Division on Aging, Disabilities & Veterans Services

“This is a day for caregivers to indulge themselves,” Smith said. “Quite a few vendors will be providing complimentary therapies, plus there will be door prizes and gift baskets.”

The program will connect caregivers with an array of service providers who will be able to distribute information about a variety of services involving care for the aged and how to access those services. Among the services included are adult day care, respite care and home health agencies.

The program is being funded through the New Jersey Department of Human Services, Division on Aging Services.

The County’s Office on Aging offers information about the services, programs and resources available to residents 60 years of age and older. Programs funded through the Office on Aging include providing supportive services for caregivers, transportation, home care, physical fitness, education and recreation. The Office on Aging can be reached at 732-431-7450.

 

Democrats Campaign in Non-Partisan Election

What?

I can’t understand what the people of Highlands – particularly the Mayor and Council members – don’t understand about nonpartisan government?  There are to be no defined political party affiliations and each candidate is to run as an individual.  I suppose you can run as a “pair” but it is my understanding that there can be no reference to a party affiliation.  I remember at the meeting immediately following the passage of the nonpartisan referendum Mayor Nolan expressed the opinion that he thought it was a wonderful opportunity to give every one a chance to run without the encumbrance of party affiliation.  

Now at the eleventh hour he writes a letter as a Republican Mayor asking the people of Highlands to vote for the 2  incumbent Democratic Council members. Where is the nonpartisanship that he thought was so wonderful.  Of course their signs do not declare that they are Democrats but one of the “partners” was endorsed by the Monmouth County Democratic Party Chairman and the Highlands Democratic chair has certainly been campaigning for them.  As a matter of fact 4 of the candidates are registered democrats and 1 is undeclared but 3 have chosen to run independently as nonpartisans because it was the wish of the people of Highlands who voted for the nonpartisan referendum.

The literature received on behalf of the incumbent Democrats yesterday was sent from an erroneous address there is no 238 Bayshore Drive in Highlands, as a matter of fact there is no Bayshore Drive in Highlands.  The first 3 projects have to be done because of the storm and certainly should have been taken care of long before the weeks immediately preceding the election especially the Community Center.  The streetscape grant was not their original idea and was initiated by the BID in 2000-2003.

Project 6, the electrical work at veterans park.  One “old time” veteran has been asking to have the flags lighted at night, as is the law of the land, at veterans park for 10 or more years but they never could seem to accommodate him.  They lit the statues but never the flags. And of course the repairing of the electric has to be done anyway because of Superstorm Sandy.

Please recognize the farcicality of the recent letter and information distributed by the Mayor and the 2 incumbent council people and vote for Highlands.  My choice is Claudette D’Arrigo and Carolyn Broullon truly independent candidates who care.

Sincerely,

 

Carol Bucco

Highlands, NJ

 

Democrats Campaign in Non-Partisan Election

What?

I can’t understand what the people of Highlands – particularly the Mayor and Council members – don’t understand about nonpartisan government?  There are to be no defined political party affiliations and each candidate is to run as an individual.  I suppose you can run as a “pair” but it is my understanding that there can be no reference to a party affiliation.  I remember at the meeting immediately following the passage of the nonpartisan referendum Mayor Nolan expressed the opinion that he thought it was a wonderful opportunity to give every one a chance to run without the encumbrance of party affiliation.  

Now at the eleventh hour he writes a letter as a Republican Mayor asking the people of Highlands to vote for the 2  incumbent Democratic Council members. Where is the nonpartisanship that he thought was so wonderful.  Of course their signs do not declare that they are Democrats but one of the “partners” was endorsed by the Monmouth County Democratic Party Chairman and the Highlands Democratic chair has certainly been campaigning for them.  As a matter of fact 4 of the candidates are registered democrats and 1 is undeclared but 3 have chosen to run independently as nonpartisans because it was the wish of the people of Highlands who voted for the nonpartisan referendum.

The literature received on behalf of the incumbent Democrats yesterday was sent from an erroneous address there is no 238 Bayshore Drive in Highlands, as a matter of fact there is no Bayshore Drive in Highlands.  The first 3 projects have to be done because of the storm and certainly should have been taken care of long before the weeks immediately preceding the election especially the Community Center.  The streetscape grant was not their original idea and was initiated by the BID in 2000-2003.

Project 6, the electrical work at veterans park.  One “old time” veteran has been asking to have the flags lighted at night, as is the law of the land, at veterans park for 10 or more years but they never could seem to accommodate him.  They lit the statues but never the flags. And of course the repairing of the electric has to be done anyway because of Superstorm Sandy.

Please recognize the farcicality of the recent letter and information distributed by the Mayor and the 2 incumbent council people and vote for Highlands.  My choice is Claudette D’Arrigo and Carolyn Broullon truly independent candidates who care.

Sincerely,

 

Carol Bucco

Highlands, NJ

 

Next Available Middletown Flu Shot Clinics December 4, 11

flu shotMIDDLETOWN, NJ – The Middletown Township Health Department is conducting free Flu Clinics for township residents ages 6 months to adult. The next available clinics are December 4th and 11th from 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. 

Clinics will be held at the department’s administrative office, located at 180 Main Street, Port Monmouth. Registration is required.

Fill out our online form at www.middletownnj.org/flu or call 732-615-2095 for more information.

Next Available Middletown Flu Shot Clinics December 4, 11

flu shotMIDDLETOWN, NJ – The Middletown Township Health Department is conducting free Flu Clinics for township residents ages 6 months to adult. The next available clinics are December 4th and 11th from 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. 

Clinics will be held at the department’s administrative office, located at 180 Main Street, Port Monmouth. Registration is required.

Fill out our online form at www.middletownnj.org/flu or call 732-615-2095 for more information.

Guild of Creative Art Presents the Plein Air Painters of the Jersey Coast

gca clay pit park patricia mekoPHOTO:  “Clay Pit Park” Oil by Patricia Meko of Belford  

Opening reception and live music on Sunday, November 15 from 3 – 5 pm featuring an oil painting demonstration by Anthony Migliaccio at 3:30

SHREWSBURY, NJ – The Plein Air Painters of the Jersey Coast paint locally and throughout Monmouth County regularly as a group. The featured artists depict outdoor scenes in acrylic, oil, pastel and watercolor on location.

Continue reading Guild of Creative Art Presents the Plein Air Painters of the Jersey Coast

Guild of Creative Art Presents the Plein Air Painters of the Jersey Coast

gca clay pit park patricia mekoPHOTO:  “Clay Pit Park” Oil by Patricia Meko of Belford  

Opening reception and live music on Sunday, November 15 from 3 – 5 pm featuring an oil painting demonstration by Anthony Migliaccio at 3:30

SHREWSBURY, NJ – The Plein Air Painters of the Jersey Coast paint locally and throughout Monmouth County regularly as a group. The featured artists depict outdoor scenes in acrylic, oil, pastel and watercolor on location.

Continue reading Guild of Creative Art Presents the Plein Air Painters of the Jersey Coast

It Should be a November to Remember for Drivers

The Week

The average price at the pump has continued to fall, bringing the national average to $2.18 per gallon, the lowest price since February. Motorists are enjoying lower prices at the pump, with today’s average reflecting a discount of four cents per gallon week-over-week and 11 cents per gallon month-over-month. Pump prices remain significantly lower than this same date last year and the national average is down 83 cents per gallon.

CURRENT AND PAST GAS PRICE AVERAGES

Regular Unleaded Gasoline (*indicates record high)

 
10/30/15
Week Ago
Year Ago
National
$2.18 $2.22
$3.01
New Jersey
$1.93
$1.95
$2.84
Trenton
$1.96
$1.97
$2.90
Cape May County
$1.91
$1.94
$2.80
Burlington
$1.94
$1.96
$2.83
Middlesex, Somerset, Hunterdon Counties
$1.94
$1.96
$2.83
Monmouth, Ocean Counties
$1.93
$1.95
$2.82
Crude Oil

$46.44 per barrel

$44.60 per barrel
$81.12 per barrel

The Weekend

“Falling crude oil prices and ample domestic supplies have kept pump prices moving lower over the past several weeks,” said Tracy Noble, spokesperson for AAA Mid-Atlantic.  “These same factors are also likely to keep gas prices steady through the rest of the year.”

West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil saw a two-month low in trading Tuesday ($42.58) and closed out Friday’s formal trading session on the NYMEX at $46.44.  The national average could fall below the $2 per gallon benchmark before the end of the year for the first time since 2009, barring any unanticipated disruptions in supply or unexpected jumps in the price of crude oil.

The Week Ahead

Demand for gasoline continues to dip and as does the threat of disturbances in the Gulf of Mexico as hurricane season comes to a close on November 30. Larger U.S. oil inventories and a stronger U.S. dollar will likely continue to drive the price of gas lower for the remainder of the year.

 

It Should be a November to Remember for Drivers

The Week

The average price at the pump has continued to fall, bringing the national average to $2.18 per gallon, the lowest price since February. Motorists are enjoying lower prices at the pump, with today’s average reflecting a discount of four cents per gallon week-over-week and 11 cents per gallon month-over-month. Pump prices remain significantly lower than this same date last year and the national average is down 83 cents per gallon.

CURRENT AND PAST GAS PRICE AVERAGES

Regular Unleaded Gasoline (*indicates record high)

 
10/30/15
Week Ago
Year Ago
National
$2.18 $2.22
$3.01
New Jersey
$1.93
$1.95
$2.84
Trenton
$1.96
$1.97
$2.90
Cape May County
$1.91
$1.94
$2.80
Burlington
$1.94
$1.96
$2.83
Middlesex, Somerset, Hunterdon Counties
$1.94
$1.96
$2.83
Monmouth, Ocean Counties
$1.93
$1.95
$2.82
Crude Oil

$46.44 per barrel

$44.60 per barrel
$81.12 per barrel

The Weekend

“Falling crude oil prices and ample domestic supplies have kept pump prices moving lower over the past several weeks,” said Tracy Noble, spokesperson for AAA Mid-Atlantic.  “These same factors are also likely to keep gas prices steady through the rest of the year.”

West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil saw a two-month low in trading Tuesday ($42.58) and closed out Friday’s formal trading session on the NYMEX at $46.44.  The national average could fall below the $2 per gallon benchmark before the end of the year for the first time since 2009, barring any unanticipated disruptions in supply or unexpected jumps in the price of crude oil.

The Week Ahead

Demand for gasoline continues to dip and as does the threat of disturbances in the Gulf of Mexico as hurricane season comes to a close on November 30. Larger U.S. oil inventories and a stronger U.S. dollar will likely continue to drive the price of gas lower for the remainder of the year.