St. George’s-by-the-River Canterbury Art Show to Feature Work by 90 Artists

pear box marybeth oberPHOTO: Pear Box by MaryBeth Ober

RUMSON, NJ – St. George’s-by-the-River Episcopal Church is celebrating its Fifth Anniversary of the Canterbury Arts Show … a Tapestry of the Arts, the premier local exhibition and sale of Juried and Non-Juried artwork.

The three-day event will take place Labor Day Weekend: Friday, September 2 from 10 am to 6 pm; Saturday, September 3 from 10 am to 6 pm; and Sunday, September 4 from 12 pm to 4 pm. There will be a preview and Meet the Artists reception on Thursday, September 1 from 7 pm to 9 pm.

The event will take place at St. George’s-by-the-River, 7 Lincoln Avenue, Rumson, New Jersey.

Hundreds of attendees and art patrons have enjoyed the Canterbury Art show. Each year, over 600 works by artists from all over New Jersey and beyond are displayed. For the 2016 show, the committee welcomes 38 new artists who will be exhibiting for the first time. Among them are Nanci France-Vaz, Ellen Gavin, Bonnie Martelli, Jerry Mesander, Grace Modla, Rebeccah Newman and MaryBeth Ober. All of the seven listed artists have dedicated themselves to the art show exhibit and sale by entering artwork pieces in multiple show segments. You’ll be thrilled to see their Juried works at the Canterbury Art Show!

Proceeds from the Art Show directly benefit St. George’s-by-the-River and its Outreach Grants to more than 30 local agencies serving the needy of Monmouth and Ocean Counties, including Lunch Break, Parker Family Health Clinic, Family Promise, HABcore, The Center in Asbury Park, and more.

Tickets to the Canterbury Art Show … a Tapestry of the Arts can be purchased in advance on the event web site www.canterburyartshow.com or at the door each day. Daytime show tickets are $10 each and are good for all days of the show. Tickets to the Thursday, September 1 Meet the Artists reception are $40 in advance and $50 at the door. The reception includes beverages and hors d’doeuvres.   The purchase of a reception ticket provides the purchaser with free entry to the show every day.

For more information on the 2016 Canterbury Art show go to www.canterburyartshow.com or email [email protected].

 

St. George’s-by-the-River Canterbury Art Show to Feature Work by 90 Artists

pear box marybeth oberPHOTO: Pear Box by MaryBeth Ober

RUMSON, NJ – St. George’s-by-the-River Episcopal Church is celebrating its Fifth Anniversary of the Canterbury Arts Show … a Tapestry of the Arts, the premier local exhibition and sale of Juried and Non-Juried artwork.

The three-day event will take place Labor Day Weekend: Friday, September 2 from 10 am to 6 pm; Saturday, September 3 from 10 am to 6 pm; and Sunday, September 4 from 12 pm to 4 pm. There will be a preview and Meet the Artists reception on Thursday, September 1 from 7 pm to 9 pm.

The event will take place at St. George’s-by-the-River, 7 Lincoln Avenue, Rumson, New Jersey.

Hundreds of attendees and art patrons have enjoyed the Canterbury Art show. Each year, over 600 works by artists from all over New Jersey and beyond are displayed. For the 2016 show, the committee welcomes 38 new artists who will be exhibiting for the first time. Among them are Nanci France-Vaz, Ellen Gavin, Bonnie Martelli, Jerry Mesander, Grace Modla, Rebeccah Newman and MaryBeth Ober. All of the seven listed artists have dedicated themselves to the art show exhibit and sale by entering artwork pieces in multiple show segments. You’ll be thrilled to see their Juried works at the Canterbury Art Show!

Proceeds from the Art Show directly benefit St. George’s-by-the-River and its Outreach Grants to more than 30 local agencies serving the needy of Monmouth and Ocean Counties, including Lunch Break, Parker Family Health Clinic, Family Promise, HABcore, The Center in Asbury Park, and more.

Tickets to the Canterbury Art Show … a Tapestry of the Arts can be purchased in advance on the event web site www.canterburyartshow.com or at the door each day. Daytime show tickets are $10 each and are good for all days of the show. Tickets to the Thursday, September 1 Meet the Artists reception are $40 in advance and $50 at the door. The reception includes beverages and hors d’doeuvres.   The purchase of a reception ticket provides the purchaser with free entry to the show every day.

For more information on the 2016 Canterbury Art show go to www.canterburyartshow.com or email [email protected].

 

Travel: Cuba, Art and Music

cuba dance classThey’re a musical group, the Cuban people. They love to dance, are proud of the salsa, automatically start to move rhythmically whenever they hear music, and can dance at outdoor restaurants on cobblestoned streets with abandon and joy.

muriel j smith 120There are plenty of discotheques and nightclubs in and around Old Havana, and it seems that 90 pesos, about $10 American, is the going fee for entry. The one evening our group of six Americans and eight Cubans decided to go, the club had had a fire earlier in the evening, so the club part was closed. The restaurant, however, was open, but we opted to move on.

There is no doubt there are two different and distinct styles of living in Cuba. Continue reading Travel: Cuba, Art and Music

Travel: Cuba, Art and Music

cuba dance classThey’re a musical group, the Cuban people. They love to dance, are proud of the salsa, automatically start to move rhythmically whenever they hear music, and can dance at outdoor restaurants on cobblestoned streets with abandon and joy.

muriel j smith 120There are plenty of discotheques and nightclubs in and around Old Havana, and it seems that 90 pesos, about $10 American, is the going fee for entry. The one evening our group of six Americans and eight Cubans decided to go, the club had had a fire earlier in the evening, so the club part was closed. The restaurant, however, was open, but we opted to move on.

There is no doubt there are two different and distinct styles of living in Cuba. Continue reading Travel: Cuba, Art and Music

Review – The Infiltrator

david prown 120I’m sure I never saw a single preview for the new film “The Infiltrator” starring Bryan Cranston.  Now to me, showing my age, I’ll forever think of him as the Dad in the hit “Malcolm in the Middle.  However, clearly he has serious acting chops as he is getting meatier and meatier on TV (highlighting with “Breaking Bad”) and Screen (“Trumbo” – Best actor nomination).

So just stumbled in with low expectations and boy was I surprised. Cranston is a highly respected Federal Agent Robert Mazur in the mid 80’s in where drugs (mostly cocaine) and the laundering of the $ to wash the profits is exploding in the US.

What I didn’t know till the end (though I got plenty of hints during the film if my memory was better), that this was a true story.  Nice guy/father/husband is a pro at his job.  However, the caldron of drugs, money and violence that surrounded this era in our countries history was near unprecedented (at that time).

Mazur plays a fancy dancy money launderer trying to infiltrate the highest levels of the notorious Pablo Escobar’s drug ring.

What makes this film work is the escalating tension as Cranston/Mazur gets deeper and deeper into this dark and dangerous international world of drugs and $.  He struggles compromising his values and his family vs the having to keep redrawing the line in the sand as the rules of this drug world were deadly.

Again, playing a true federal agent chasing a true heinous drug lord (Escobar) and involving a true bank BCCI (huge story in the 80’s) really made this a terrific and impressive movie experience.

Check it out for sure.

Review – The Infiltrator

david prown 120I’m sure I never saw a single preview for the new film “The Infiltrator” starring Bryan Cranston.  Now to me, showing my age, I’ll forever think of him as the Dad in the hit “Malcolm in the Middle.  However, clearly he has serious acting chops as he is getting meatier and meatier on TV (highlighting with “Breaking Bad”) and Screen (“Trumbo” – Best actor nomination).

So just stumbled in with low expectations and boy was I surprised. Cranston is a highly respected Federal Agent Robert Mazur in the mid 80’s in where drugs (mostly cocaine) and the laundering of the $ to wash the profits is exploding in the US.

What I didn’t know till the end (though I got plenty of hints during the film if my memory was better), that this was a true story.  Nice guy/father/husband is a pro at his job.  However, the caldron of drugs, money and violence that surrounded this era in our countries history was near unprecedented (at that time).

Mazur plays a fancy dancy money launderer trying to infiltrate the highest levels of the notorious Pablo Escobar’s drug ring.

What makes this film work is the escalating tension as Cranston/Mazur gets deeper and deeper into this dark and dangerous international world of drugs and $.  He struggles compromising his values and his family vs the having to keep redrawing the line in the sand as the rules of this drug world were deadly.

Again, playing a true federal agent chasing a true heinous drug lord (Escobar) and involving a true bank BCCI (huge story in the 80’s) really made this a terrific and impressive movie experience.

Check it out for sure.

Midwest Woman Fighting Body and Mind

daniel vance 120She didn’t want her real name used in print. “Mary” reads this column in a small Midwest city, has a physical disability greatly affecting her mobility, and has a mental health diagnosis of severe and recurrent major depressive disorder. If not for her pets over the years, she said, she wouldn’t have coped nearly as well in life.

In a telephone interview, 65-year-old Mary said, “First, it’s extremely hard for me to walk. I was born with a congenital condition in which my joints were not fully formed. I’ve dislocated many joints over the years, but mostly my knees. No doctor ever mentioned this condition until 1999, when I broke my leg, and the doctor taking x-rays mentioned I had the congental condition.”

She said the worst part about growing up with it involved always doing “poorly” in most school physical activities, even hanging from playground monkey bars. On the other hand, her loose joints gave her an advantage at dancing and in yoga, where she excelled. She said her joints stretched in ways other children’s couldn’t.

“As for depression, it began with my father’s unexpected death, when I was 8 years old,” she said. “Absolutely nothing was the same after that event. While before I was an outgoing child, I became an extreme introvert. I’ve been unable to form many good relationships over the years because of always (fearing) someone will die or walk away from me. And they generally do.”

Feelings of loneliness and isolation have been her biggest problem areas. To emotionally get by, she has had pets to fill up her “loneliness” gap..

She said, “For example, I’ve had a cat, literally, all 65 years of my life. As for dogs, they are so important because they give you so much love. They enhance so many areas of your life, such as the joy they feel when they are off leash and they can run. I live vicariously through my dog. I have never really experienced much joy in my life and so I get a huge kick out of watching my dog enjoy herself.”

In offering advice to people with disabilities feeling isolated and lonely, she said, “The best thing you can do for yourself is get an animal. If you’re looking to get out of yourself, get a dog, because they are social creatures and will lead you to social interactions.”

Facebook: Disabilities by Daniel J. Vance. [Sponsored by Blue Valley Sod.]

Midwest Woman Fighting Body and Mind

daniel vance 120She didn’t want her real name used in print. “Mary” reads this column in a small Midwest city, has a physical disability greatly affecting her mobility, and has a mental health diagnosis of severe and recurrent major depressive disorder. If not for her pets over the years, she said, she wouldn’t have coped nearly as well in life.

In a telephone interview, 65-year-old Mary said, “First, it’s extremely hard for me to walk. I was born with a congenital condition in which my joints were not fully formed. I’ve dislocated many joints over the years, but mostly my knees. No doctor ever mentioned this condition until 1999, when I broke my leg, and the doctor taking x-rays mentioned I had the congental condition.”

She said the worst part about growing up with it involved always doing “poorly” in most school physical activities, even hanging from playground monkey bars. On the other hand, her loose joints gave her an advantage at dancing and in yoga, where she excelled. She said her joints stretched in ways other children’s couldn’t.

“As for depression, it began with my father’s unexpected death, when I was 8 years old,” she said. “Absolutely nothing was the same after that event. While before I was an outgoing child, I became an extreme introvert. I’ve been unable to form many good relationships over the years because of always (fearing) someone will die or walk away from me. And they generally do.”

Feelings of loneliness and isolation have been her biggest problem areas. To emotionally get by, she has had pets to fill up her “loneliness” gap..

She said, “For example, I’ve had a cat, literally, all 65 years of my life. As for dogs, they are so important because they give you so much love. They enhance so many areas of your life, such as the joy they feel when they are off leash and they can run. I live vicariously through my dog. I have never really experienced much joy in my life and so I get a huge kick out of watching my dog enjoy herself.”

In offering advice to people with disabilities feeling isolated and lonely, she said, “The best thing you can do for yourself is get an animal. If you’re looking to get out of yourself, get a dog, because they are social creatures and will lead you to social interactions.”

Facebook: Disabilities by Daniel J. Vance. [Sponsored by Blue Valley Sod.]

Klepner Offers Chair Yoga at the Library

SHREWSBURY – Sarah Klepner, LVCYT, is her own best advertisement that Yoga improves energy and is good for both mind and body. The Long Branch resident is presenting the Chair Yoga program scheduled for Friday, Aug. 5 at the Eastern Branch of the Monmouth County Library. The 11 a.m. program which is part of the First Friday for Seniors Series at the Route 35 facility, is a series of stretches from a seated position, making them available to a broad range of people of all ages.

     Practiced without the need for getting down on a mat, Chair Yoga, which has been practicing for more than 5,000 years, is designed to improve breathing, invigorate energy, lubricate joints and relieve muscle pain.

   Klepner, the instructor for the program at the library, is energy in motion as she presents the class as just one of her many diverse talents. Coming to New Jersey from Chicago, where she wrote for a local newspaper, earned a degree in philosophy, and took on local issues, Klepner earned her teaching certificate in Yoga earlier this year and is in demand in a number of different locations and facilities, including sites in Middletown, Belmar, Red Bank and Long Branch. The instructor is also a substitute teacher in the Red Bank Regional school system and a waitress at a local restaurant.

   “There are numerous benefits to yoga,” she explains in her resonant and precise voice. “Among other things, it has been known to improve concentration and help in relaxation techniques. Klepner noted acupressure and Quigong, an ancient Chinese procedure, can also be an integral part of yoga, as both assist in relaxation and restoring energy. They cultivate a mind-body practice that improves both mental and physical health by focusing on posture, movement and breathing technique.

   No reservations are needed for the program, which, as with all programs at the Monmouth County library, is offered at no cost to participants.

   Further information is available by visiting the library’s website at Monmouthcountylib.org.

 

Klepner Offers Chair Yoga at the Library

SHREWSBURY – Sarah Klepner, LVCYT, is her own best advertisement that Yoga improves energy and is good for both mind and body. The Long Branch resident is presenting the Chair Yoga program scheduled for Friday, Aug. 5 at the Eastern Branch of the Monmouth County Library. The 11 a.m. program which is part of the First Friday for Seniors Series at the Route 35 facility, is a series of stretches from a seated position, making them available to a broad range of people of all ages.

     Practiced without the need for getting down on a mat, Chair Yoga, which has been practicing for more than 5,000 years, is designed to improve breathing, invigorate energy, lubricate joints and relieve muscle pain.

   Klepner, the instructor for the program at the library, is energy in motion as she presents the class as just one of her many diverse talents. Coming to New Jersey from Chicago, where she wrote for a local newspaper, earned a degree in philosophy, and took on local issues, Klepner earned her teaching certificate in Yoga earlier this year and is in demand in a number of different locations and facilities, including sites in Middletown, Belmar, Red Bank and Long Branch. The instructor is also a substitute teacher in the Red Bank Regional school system and a waitress at a local restaurant.

   “There are numerous benefits to yoga,” she explains in her resonant and precise voice. “Among other things, it has been known to improve concentration and help in relaxation techniques. Klepner noted acupressure and Quigong, an ancient Chinese procedure, can also be an integral part of yoga, as both assist in relaxation and restoring energy. They cultivate a mind-body practice that improves both mental and physical health by focusing on posture, movement and breathing technique.

   No reservations are needed for the program, which, as with all programs at the Monmouth County library, is offered at no cost to participants.

   Further information is available by visiting the library’s website at Monmouthcountylib.org.