AH Lions Donate Zoll ResQCPR System to First Aid Squad

ah lions ahfasPHOTO: Members of the Atlantic Highlands Lions Club present a Zoll ResQCPR System to the Atlantic Highlands First Aid & Safety Squad. (L-R) Atlantic Highlands Lions Club Secretary, Norris Horsman, Past President, Lee Hofman, 1st Vice President, Tim Paddack, President, Penny Hofman-Morris and AHFAS Chief Bill Mount. Photo by Joe Mendoza.

ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS, NJ – The Atlantic Highlands Lions Club is giving back to the community in a crucial way by donating a Zoll ResQCPR System to the Atlantic Highlands First Aid & Safety Squad. Continue reading AH Lions Donate Zoll ResQCPR System to First Aid Squad

AH Lions Donate Zoll ResQCPR System to First Aid Squad

ah lions ahfasPHOTO: Members of the Atlantic Highlands Lions Club present a Zoll ResQCPR System to the Atlantic Highlands First Aid & Safety Squad. (L-R) Atlantic Highlands Lions Club Secretary, Norris Horsman, Past President, Lee Hofman, 1st Vice President, Tim Paddack, President, Penny Hofman-Morris and AHFAS Chief Bill Mount. Photo by Joe Mendoza.

ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS, NJ – The Atlantic Highlands Lions Club is giving back to the community in a crucial way by donating a Zoll ResQCPR System to the Atlantic Highlands First Aid & Safety Squad. Continue reading AH Lions Donate Zoll ResQCPR System to First Aid Squad

AH First Presbyterian Church Sermon: You’re Welcome

ah first presbyterian churchATLANTIC HIGHLANDS — The Rev. Paul F. Rack will preach Sunday on John’s reminder that we are a welcoming church and that we must be careful not to allow misguided individuals to accrue too much power.

Rack’s message is entitled “You’re Welcome,” based on 3 John, which is the disciple’s third and final letter and provides a tiny window into church life in the first century.

The service will be held in the air-conditioned Fellowship Hall in the rear of the 126-year-old First Presbyterian Church at Third and East Highland avenues.

“John lifts up the welcoming ministry of the community, especially regarding traveling mission workers,” according to the pastor. “At the same time he has critical words to say about a particular self-serving leader who does not welcome others.

“John reminds us that power in the church is based on the authority of Jesus, who distributes it among many servants.”

All area residents are also invited to join the congregation as it worships at the Gazebo in the municipal marina on Sunday, Sept. 25.

AH First Presbyterian Church Sermon: You’re Welcome

ah first presbyterian churchATLANTIC HIGHLANDS — The Rev. Paul F. Rack will preach Sunday on John’s reminder that we are a welcoming church and that we must be careful not to allow misguided individuals to accrue too much power.

Rack’s message is entitled “You’re Welcome,” based on 3 John, which is the disciple’s third and final letter and provides a tiny window into church life in the first century.

The service will be held in the air-conditioned Fellowship Hall in the rear of the 126-year-old First Presbyterian Church at Third and East Highland avenues.

“John lifts up the welcoming ministry of the community, especially regarding traveling mission workers,” according to the pastor. “At the same time he has critical words to say about a particular self-serving leader who does not welcome others.

“John reminds us that power in the church is based on the authority of Jesus, who distributes it among many servants.”

All area residents are also invited to join the congregation as it worships at the Gazebo in the municipal marina on Sunday, Sept. 25.

Father Delzell a Part of OLPH history

rev david delzellThere was a memorial mass for the Rev. David Delzell at Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church in Highlands last week, and it brought together families, teachers, and a couple of generations of students who all have their own special memory of the priest who served as pastor there longer than any other priest in the church’s 133 year history.

     Father Delzell died in Pennsylvania Aug. 7 at 93 years of age, and though it’s been 22 years since his pastorate ended, the folks at Tuesday evening’s mass enjoyed reminiscing over their many memories of his 26 years here and certainly let those in attendance who didn’t know the priest realize he was a force to be reckoned with, a memorable friend, and a devoted leader.

   The ‘60s through 80’s of the 20th century aren’t exactly history, but there are many who do not know the leadership qualities of Father Dave, as he was affectionately known, so for newcomers, even recent history is interesting.

   The welcoming mass when Father Dave first came to Highlands was proof he was a beloved priest; the church was filled with not only the Highlands folks wondering what their new pastor would be like, but busloads of parishioners from St. Cecelia’s in Iselin, who were sorry to see him go and wanted to wish him well in his new pastorate.

   And Father got right to work building and improving the parish. The school building was only about five years old when Father Dave came, but he immediately enmeshed himself in the lives of the youngsters, and did a lot of work himself to save the parish money…things like mowing the lawn, fixing plumbing,…he even was a caller at BINGO! He brought in the Franciscan Missionary Sisters of the Infant Jesus to teach, and three of them who were here in the 70s and 80s, Sisters Gloria Louise, Angela Pia and Jerrilynn were here for the mass last week and to share their own memories of teaching in Highlands.

That shrine of Our Lady of Perpetual Help along the back wall inside church was also Father Dave’s idea, and to the delight of all, he even installed air-conditioning in the school and in the basement of the church, where he has started a kindergarten.

   It was in the early 1980s that the pastor began planning for the parish’s centennial in 1983, and decided some major renovations were in order. In addition a good scrubbing, painting, and new carpeting, Father also moved the pews around, allowing for the wider space that is at the front of the nave now. Those beautifully etched glass doors going into church were also Father’s idea, and new lighting and sound completed renovations that are still in use today.  

   These were some of the material things Father Dave accomplished. But people who knew him loved his piety, loved his spectacular tenor voice…nobody could sing O Holy Night or Ave Maria like Father Dave…. People complained about his conservative ways, but they did come dressed up for mass because he insisted on it. People complained about his not liking women wearing slacks to mass, or not allowing shorts or bathing suits for mass….but all felt a little better for looking better.

   The folks there Tuesday night remember all the fine things about Father Dave…the teachers, from Joan Wicklund in the ‘70s to Barbara Hardeman in the ‘90s,the former students, like Mari Campanella Kovich, the families, like the Pentas, the Dziedziecs, the Davis’, the newly ordained priest from St. Agnes, Father Quinn and the nun, Sister Diana Higgins, who felt mentored by Father and were in the OLPH Youth Group in the ;80s..all have their own memories. Marie Veling, a long time teacher at the school, sent special wishes for the ceremony from her home in St. Augustine, Fla.   There is no doubt Father Delzell had an impact, a positive impact, on them all.

   Today, Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church and St. Agnes Church, are joined as one parish…Our Lady of Perpetual Help-St. Agnes, and there’s another strong, enthusiastic, vibrant priest pouring new life and faith into this new community. Father Fernando Lopez was named pastor a year ago and together with associate pastor, Father Carlo Calisin, has made more friends and filled the pews with more people through his own piety and love for the people.

     It’s true, Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church is very much a part of the history of Highlands. And Father Delzell is very much a leading player in that history. But with Father Fernando at the helm, Father Carlo assisting, and Msgr. Cajetan Salemi a weekend associate, the parish of Our Lady of Perpetual Help – St. Agnes is also very much a part of the future of the Bayshore.

 

Father Delzell a Part of OLPH history

rev david delzellThere was a memorial mass for the Rev. David Delzell at Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church in Highlands last week, and it brought together families, teachers, and a couple of generations of students who all have their own special memory of the priest who served as pastor there longer than any other priest in the church’s 133 year history.

     Father Delzell died in Pennsylvania Aug. 7 at 93 years of age, and though it’s been 22 years since his pastorate ended, the folks at Tuesday evening’s mass enjoyed reminiscing over their many memories of his 26 years here and certainly let those in attendance who didn’t know the priest realize he was a force to be reckoned with, a memorable friend, and a devoted leader.

   The ‘60s through 80’s of the 20th century aren’t exactly history, but there are many who do not know the leadership qualities of Father Dave, as he was affectionately known, so for newcomers, even recent history is interesting.

   The welcoming mass when Father Dave first came to Highlands was proof he was a beloved priest; the church was filled with not only the Highlands folks wondering what their new pastor would be like, but busloads of parishioners from St. Cecelia’s in Iselin, who were sorry to see him go and wanted to wish him well in his new pastorate.

   And Father got right to work building and improving the parish. The school building was only about five years old when Father Dave came, but he immediately enmeshed himself in the lives of the youngsters, and did a lot of work himself to save the parish money…things like mowing the lawn, fixing plumbing,…he even was a caller at BINGO! He brought in the Franciscan Missionary Sisters of the Infant Jesus to teach, and three of them who were here in the 70s and 80s, Sisters Gloria Louise, Angela Pia and Jerrilynn were here for the mass last week and to share their own memories of teaching in Highlands.

That shrine of Our Lady of Perpetual Help along the back wall inside church was also Father Dave’s idea, and to the delight of all, he even installed air-conditioning in the school and in the basement of the church, where he has started a kindergarten.

   It was in the early 1980s that the pastor began planning for the parish’s centennial in 1983, and decided some major renovations were in order. In addition a good scrubbing, painting, and new carpeting, Father also moved the pews around, allowing for the wider space that is at the front of the nave now. Those beautifully etched glass doors going into church were also Father’s idea, and new lighting and sound completed renovations that are still in use today.  

   These were some of the material things Father Dave accomplished. But people who knew him loved his piety, loved his spectacular tenor voice…nobody could sing O Holy Night or Ave Maria like Father Dave…. People complained about his conservative ways, but they did come dressed up for mass because he insisted on it. People complained about his not liking women wearing slacks to mass, or not allowing shorts or bathing suits for mass….but all felt a little better for looking better.

   The folks there Tuesday night remember all the fine things about Father Dave…the teachers, from Joan Wicklund in the ‘70s to Barbara Hardeman in the ‘90s,the former students, like Mari Campanella Kovich, the families, like the Pentas, the Dziedziecs, the Davis’, the newly ordained priest from St. Agnes, Father Quinn and the nun, Sister Diana Higgins, who felt mentored by Father and were in the OLPH Youth Group in the ;80s..all have their own memories. Marie Veling, a long time teacher at the school, sent special wishes for the ceremony from her home in St. Augustine, Fla.   There is no doubt Father Delzell had an impact, a positive impact, on them all.

   Today, Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church and St. Agnes Church, are joined as one parish…Our Lady of Perpetual Help-St. Agnes, and there’s another strong, enthusiastic, vibrant priest pouring new life and faith into this new community. Father Fernando Lopez was named pastor a year ago and together with associate pastor, Father Carlo Calisin, has made more friends and filled the pews with more people through his own piety and love for the people.

     It’s true, Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church is very much a part of the history of Highlands. And Father Delzell is very much a leading player in that history. But with Father Fernando at the helm, Father Carlo assisting, and Msgr. Cajetan Salemi a weekend associate, the parish of Our Lady of Perpetual Help – St. Agnes is also very much a part of the future of the Bayshore.

 

Red Bank Regional Welcomes Class of 2020

rbr back school 2016 student lockersPHOTO: Giana Borriello, Shrewsbury, becomes acquainted with her high school locker during freshmen orientation at RBR on August 24. As a member of the class of 2020 she will spend her first year of high school in the Freshman Academy which helps RBR’s newest students adjust to high school life.

Little Silver: On August 24, Red Bank Regional High School (RBR) welcomed its newest members, incoming freshmen — the Class of 2020. The students were greeted by upper classmen student-to-student peer leaders who directed them around their new high school, assisting them in opening their lockers and answering their questions. They also created a friendly atmosphere with ice-breaker activities. Continue reading Red Bank Regional Welcomes Class of 2020

Red Bank Regional Welcomes Class of 2020

rbr back school 2016 student lockersPHOTO: Giana Borriello, Shrewsbury, becomes acquainted with her high school locker during freshmen orientation at RBR on August 24. As a member of the class of 2020 she will spend her first year of high school in the Freshman Academy which helps RBR’s newest students adjust to high school life.

Little Silver: On August 24, Red Bank Regional High School (RBR) welcomed its newest members, incoming freshmen — the Class of 2020. The students were greeted by upper classmen student-to-student peer leaders who directed them around their new high school, assisting them in opening their lockers and answering their questions. They also created a friendly atmosphere with ice-breaker activities. Continue reading Red Bank Regional Welcomes Class of 2020

Plans Announced for Soldier On Community

FARMINGDALE, NJ – Freeholder Lillian Burry and John F. Downing, CEO of Soldier On, the private non-profit organization committed to ending veteran homelessness, unveiled further plans for the proposed $17 million ratable to be located on an approximate 10-acre property on Essex Road, Tinton Falls, at a gathering of local, county, state and federal officials at Eagle Oaks Country Club Tuesday afternoon.

    Burry has been championing the proposition for the past five years, challenging every obstacle and offering alternate proposals to give the proposal alive. The new community within Tinton Falls will not only provide housing for homeless veterans but offer 21st century technology in construction of units estimated to cost approximately $275,000 each.

     First proposed for a portion of Fort Monmouth as a part of the Fort Monmouth Economic Revitalization Authority (FMERA) of which Burry is a member, the initial plans were scrapped when the non-profit organization’s bid for land on the former army installation was rejected by FMERA last year for being too low.

    Undaunted, and pursuing other potential sites, Burry met with Tinton Falls Mayor Gerry Turning, Councilman Gary Baldwin and other municipal leaders and the group found the acreage close to Seabrook Village which appeared to meet all the needs of the proposed community. Announcement of the selection of the site and the proposal was officially made at the Aug. 17 meeting of FMERA, and Tuesday’s announcement laid out more plans and proposals.

     Downing, who started the organization in 1994 to end veteran homelessness, gave a brief history of the Soldier On veterans programs, which include both permanent and transitional housing, as well as mental health, substance abuse, dental and medical services, legal assistance, employment, education and transportation services. Soldier On has a presence in five states, including Massachusetts where it originated, New York  New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Mississippi.

  In New Jersey, Soldier On provides services to veterans in eight counties, including Monmouth, with the state office in Hamilton in Mercer County.

     Downing said the Tinton Falls site for housing is ideal in every aspect, from location in an attractive community, access to recreational activities and support from other veterans to the availability of areas where the veterans can provide community services.

   Under the Solider On program, Gordon H. Mansfield Veterans limited equity cooperative housing communities are established. Each community is named for the former Deputy Secretary of Veterans Affairs  and highly decorated army veteran who completed two tours of duty in Vietnam before being named Deputy Secretary of Veterans Affairs from 2003 to 2009. Mansfield, a highly decorated veteran of Vietnam, also served as Assistant Secretary for Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity at the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Currently, Soldier On has veteran communities in

     Downing said the Tinton Falls Mansfield community would have no fewer than 50 units, no more than 100, in attached homes designed to blend in with the community and built using sustainable building and energy models that enable the residents to maintain lower energy costs and ensure low upkeep costs.

    Veterans in the housing purchase an equity stake in their homes, funding which is then held in trust and available to be returned to them should they move out. Remaining funding is financed through grants, foundations, and federal and state programs, with the veterans paying monthly fees for the affordable housing, as well as providing community service in the area. There will be 16 units in each building, buildings being two or three stories in height. Each unit will be an average of 450 square feet, with both efficiency and one bedroom units included. Most of the homeless veterans who will be served by this new housing are single, Downing said, and coupled with the single bedroom construction, the new housing also will not have any impact on local school systems. In the manner of condominium type housing throughout the country at all price levels, there will also be a number of ancillary buildings and conveniences, the CEO pointed out, including a laundry, a cafeteria, a shuttle stop for transportation which is also provided under the Soldier On program, and even a greenhouse, so veterans can grow their own plants and flowers. Plans also call for a ccolumbarium for those veterans who choose that resting place.

     Legislators from Congressman Chris Smith and State Senator Jennifer Beck to Freeholder Director Michael Arnone, all in attendance at yesterday’s meeting, were effusive in praise for Burry and her stalwart efforts over five years to make her dream of housing for homeless veterans a reality. She headed a group who traveled to Massachusetts last year to meeting with Downing, and convinced him to visit Monmouth County in search of a suitable location for housing for homeless veterans. Burry said she was inspired by the late Edith Nowels, a sister of Horace “Bud” Thorne of Middletown, a Medal of Honor recipient killed during the Battle of the Bulge.

  Smith, who was the prime sponsor of the Homeless Veterans Comprehensive Assistance Act of 2001, has worked with Downing in the past. Four years ago, he was a prime mover in New Jersey receiving a $1 million federal grant to Soldier On to assist low income veterans in central New Jersey, providing housing assistance and stability which enabled them to stay in their own homes and granting economic and employment related assistance to keep veterans from homelessness. Soldier On pointed out at Tuesday’s meeting that because of these efforts and Soldier On’s participation in numerous programs, the number of homeless vets in New Jersey has decreased. However, Downing pointed out, there is still a serious need to assist homeless veterans.
 

 

Plans Announced for Soldier On Community

FARMINGDALE, NJ – Freeholder Lillian Burry and John F. Downing, CEO of Soldier On, the private non-profit organization committed to ending veteran homelessness, unveiled further plans for the proposed $17 million ratable to be located on an approximate 10-acre property on Essex Road, Tinton Falls, at a gathering of local, county, state and federal officials at Eagle Oaks Country Club Tuesday afternoon.

    Burry has been championing the proposition for the past five years, challenging every obstacle and offering alternate proposals to give the proposal alive. The new community within Tinton Falls will not only provide housing for homeless veterans but offer 21st century technology in construction of units estimated to cost approximately $275,000 each.

     First proposed for a portion of Fort Monmouth as a part of the Fort Monmouth Economic Revitalization Authority (FMERA) of which Burry is a member, the initial plans were scrapped when the non-profit organization’s bid for land on the former army installation was rejected by FMERA last year for being too low.

    Undaunted, and pursuing other potential sites, Burry met with Tinton Falls Mayor Gerry Turning, Councilman Gary Baldwin and other municipal leaders and the group found the acreage close to Seabrook Village which appeared to meet all the needs of the proposed community. Announcement of the selection of the site and the proposal was officially made at the Aug. 17 meeting of FMERA, and Tuesday’s announcement laid out more plans and proposals.

     Downing, who started the organization in 1994 to end veteran homelessness, gave a brief history of the Soldier On veterans programs, which include both permanent and transitional housing, as well as mental health, substance abuse, dental and medical services, legal assistance, employment, education and transportation services. Soldier On has a presence in five states, including Massachusetts where it originated, New York  New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Mississippi.

  In New Jersey, Soldier On provides services to veterans in eight counties, including Monmouth, with the state office in Hamilton in Mercer County.

     Downing said the Tinton Falls site for housing is ideal in every aspect, from location in an attractive community, access to recreational activities and support from other veterans to the availability of areas where the veterans can provide community services.

   Under the Solider On program, Gordon H. Mansfield Veterans limited equity cooperative housing communities are established. Each community is named for the former Deputy Secretary of Veterans Affairs  and highly decorated army veteran who completed two tours of duty in Vietnam before being named Deputy Secretary of Veterans Affairs from 2003 to 2009. Mansfield, a highly decorated veteran of Vietnam, also served as Assistant Secretary for Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity at the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Currently, Soldier On has veteran communities in

     Downing said the Tinton Falls Mansfield community would have no fewer than 50 units, no more than 100, in attached homes designed to blend in with the community and built using sustainable building and energy models that enable the residents to maintain lower energy costs and ensure low upkeep costs.

    Veterans in the housing purchase an equity stake in their homes, funding which is then held in trust and available to be returned to them should they move out. Remaining funding is financed through grants, foundations, and federal and state programs, with the veterans paying monthly fees for the affordable housing, as well as providing community service in the area. There will be 16 units in each building, buildings being two or three stories in height. Each unit will be an average of 450 square feet, with both efficiency and one bedroom units included. Most of the homeless veterans who will be served by this new housing are single, Downing said, and coupled with the single bedroom construction, the new housing also will not have any impact on local school systems. In the manner of condominium type housing throughout the country at all price levels, there will also be a number of ancillary buildings and conveniences, the CEO pointed out, including a laundry, a cafeteria, a shuttle stop for transportation which is also provided under the Soldier On program, and even a greenhouse, so veterans can grow their own plants and flowers. Plans also call for a ccolumbarium for those veterans who choose that resting place.

     Legislators from Congressman Chris Smith and State Senator Jennifer Beck to Freeholder Director Michael Arnone, all in attendance at yesterday’s meeting, were effusive in praise for Burry and her stalwart efforts over five years to make her dream of housing for homeless veterans a reality. She headed a group who traveled to Massachusetts last year to meeting with Downing, and convinced him to visit Monmouth County in search of a suitable location for housing for homeless veterans. Burry said she was inspired by the late Edith Nowels, a sister of Horace “Bud” Thorne of Middletown, a Medal of Honor recipient killed during the Battle of the Bulge.

  Smith, who was the prime sponsor of the Homeless Veterans Comprehensive Assistance Act of 2001, has worked with Downing in the past. Four years ago, he was a prime mover in New Jersey receiving a $1 million federal grant to Soldier On to assist low income veterans in central New Jersey, providing housing assistance and stability which enabled them to stay in their own homes and granting economic and employment related assistance to keep veterans from homelessness. Soldier On pointed out at Tuesday’s meeting that because of these efforts and Soldier On’s participation in numerous programs, the number of homeless vets in New Jersey has decreased. However, Downing pointed out, there is still a serious need to assist homeless veterans.